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Should an old guy take up the violin?


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Should an old guy take up violin??

The answer is No. Older people should have had all their fun when they were young. At 55, you should be eating at Cafeterias and talking about Depends undergarments, not enjoying life, learning a fab instrument, and making friends online. Heck, you are old enough to be a much older brother of mine. (Well, thats a stretch, but possible).

When I taught my girlfriend's Mom (80, and sadly very very sick, she will die really soon) ( Phantom needs a hanky, this is so sad) how to use a computer, how to send email,etc, I realized that age doesnt mean Jack today. I even showed her Daddy a few tricks, and he is 84 and blind.

55 is old? You should get a bada ss sports car and start playing some fiddle.

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I agree with Andy: get a good teacher. I mostly started playing (at 39) as a fluke. I'd love to say I had a burning desire all my life to play, but that just wasn't the case. At any rate, after I got my first violin, I started looking for a teacher and found my musical guardian angel. She's taken me from not even reading music to playing in our community string orchestra. The violin has also led me into the local music club and other music organizations along with finding a new group of friends. This was almost eight years ago and I can't imagine my life without my violin. I owe a huge debt to my teacher for bringing out the latent musician in me. So go forth and find your own musical guardian angel.

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quote:

Originally posted by bonsai:

Let me join the chorus of encouragement! The musical 'love-of-my-life' has been the piano since age 4. I tried picking up the violin at 27 (10 years ago) in support of my daughter's Suzuki lessons, to no avail; it just didn't 'grab me'. Then last year, it just hit me like a ton of bricks; I had to learn the fiddle. Eight months later (averaging 2-3 hours a day practice), I derive so much joy from my fiddle, it's hard to describe it! Looking back, I have to say, I don't think I was ready to start at 27.

One more quick point, my teacher is a 3 time national junior Cape Breton fiddle champ (at the ripe old age of 17) yet despite astonishing technical savvy, he doesn't play with the emotional depth that will eventually come with more life experiences behind him. You have that already.

-bonsai

"When the student is ready the teacher appears." Buddhist saying.

It is very true, I found my teacher when I was ready. It felt like coming home when I began the violin. I guess I had to go through what I did before I was ready myself.

Regards,

Don Crandall

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We're behind you all the way! So many health articles talk about keeping young by staying in the zone and being in the now. Your violin will do this to you. When you have special moments of beauty with your violin it will be truly other-worldly, like running on the Moon or something. Nothing like it.

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Dear D

I am another "somewhat" late starter – I turned 30 in January, and started lessons a week later.

I haven’t been very musical since high school, when I played clarinet and piano, but found that I didn’t have a particular “love” of either instrument. I liked to play, but didn’t LOVE to play. After graduation, when work took over most of my time, I gave them both up completely, and didn’t really think about playing for many years. I barely even listened to any classical music during the last decade – somehow I just never took the time to treat myself to anything other than the top-40 stuff on my car radio (mind-numbing at best – probably why I listened to it!)

It seems really strange how this all came about. My husband took me for a weekend in Salzburg, Austria (we live in the UK, so this was easy for a few days) in November, and we went to a Mozart dinner concert. I sat watching the string quartet from a few feet away, and two very clear thoughts came to my head. 1) You know, I always wanted to learn how to play a violin; and 2) Well, why the **** don’t I TRY to learn then? It was just so clear – it’s like “why didn’t I think about this years ago?” What was I waiting for?

In the next month, I pondered it, and rolled it over in my mind to see whether or not I was serious or it was just a whim… but by December I was very sure. I found a teacher, and bought an instrument – not too basic, but one I hoped I wouldn’t grow out of after 6 months. I picked it up on my birthday, and I haven’t been so excited about a birthday present since I was a little girl.

My parents and friends have been bemused by the whole idea – I think the general concensus was that I was a little crazy for my attempts, but I didn’t care. Even though the first few weeks were **** on my husband and immediate neighbours, I have had a great time since, and while I’m not great, I’m getting a real feel for what I want to get out of my playing. I love to practice, and hope to get good enough to join an amateur orchestra and do some ensemble work.

You are NEVER too old – and if it’s something you will love to do, please try it. If you don’t love it, try something else, but if you DO, it’s priceless.

smile.gif

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I agree with the other posts. I started violin at age 46 (last year) and love it. Of course I would love to hear only beautiful, marvelous music from my instrument when I play, but I'm willing to work and be patient. If I live to be 77, I will have played 30 years!

If you love the violin, then just do it! Although I still play the guitar, my heart truly is with the violin.

Good luck!

Jill

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I just started playing violin (well, let's call a spade a spade...FIDDLE) five months ago at the ripe old age of 33. I agree with the member who said it felt like coming home.

I have been trying to learn guitar for about 10 years now, and tried piano when I was a kid. Both times, I hated hated hated to practice. I quit piano in high school. As for guitar, I just kept buying more and more expensive ones, thinking that would help. I mean, everyone loves to play guitar, right? Guitar players are a dime a dozen, so it must be MY PROBLEM that I hate to practice! I'm lazy! I'm deficient! ACtually, I just hadn't found the right instrument.

In November a friend at work mentioned that her parents had brought her a bunch of stuff from her old bedroom, which they'd finally converted. One of the things she was "stuck with" was her college violin. On a whim, I asked to borrow it, never having an inkling previously that I might want to learn this instrument.

Now I am hooked. I can't wait to get home and practice. Sometimes I bring it to work so I can find an empty room and practice during the day. I started by teaching myself with leesons available free online (I pledged not to spend money until I was sure) and after three enjoyable months of that, I applied for a scholarship for private lessons at the Old Town School of folk music. My teacher tells me I am progressing amazingly quickly and will be ready for third level group classes soon. I also attend a weekly old-time jam with some older friends of my husband's who have been playing for many years. They are very encouraging and helped me get started and also choose a Red Screamer of my own which recently came in the mail. I know I'm a fiddler for life now and I'm so grateful I took a chance and followed my instincts.

I think prodigy is over-rated and late-blooming is under-valued. If we didn't start things later in life we'd miss the great pleasures--and brain-health--that come with continuing to learn. That's what keeps us young!

Go for it!

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Today I read about a lady of 98, here in the UK, who has just started violin lessons - thus realising her lifelong ambition of playing the violin.

I admire her immensely. It's never too late until you're 6 feet under, so go for it. If you really want to play the violin, who cares how old you are? You'll regret it if you don't. smile.gif

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The secret is to start, but keep at it! Do not give up. Find the time to practice regularly; do those scales and etudes. If it sounds like crap, keep doing it. As someone has already said, if you live another 30 years and practice an hour a day, you will make good music.

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  • 2 weeks later...

quote:

Originally posted by zillaspice:

I just started playing violin (well, let's call a spade a spade...FIDDLE) five months ago at the ripe old age of 33. I agree with the member who said it felt like coming home.

I have been trying to learn guitar for about 10 years now, and tried piano when I was a kid. Both times, I hated hated hated to practice. I quit piano in high school. As for guitar, I just kept buying more and more expensive ones, thinking that would help. I mean, everyone loves to play guitar, right? Guitar players are a dime a dozen, so it must be MY PROBLEM that I hate to practice! I'm lazy! I'm deficient! ACtually, I just hadn't found the right instrument.

In November a friend at work mentioned that her parents had brought her a bunch of stuff from her old bedroom, which they'd finally converted. One of the things she was "stuck with" was her college violin. On a whim, I asked to borrow it, never having an inkling previously that I might want to learn this instrument.

Now I am hooked. I can't wait to get home and practice. Sometimes I bring it to work so I can find an empty room and practice during the day. I started by teaching myself with leesons available free online (I pledged not to spend money until I was sure) and after three enjoyable months of that, I applied for a scholarship for private lessons at the Old Town School of folk music. My teacher tells me I am progressing amazingly quickly and will be ready for third level group classes soon. I also attend a weekly old-time jam with some older friends of my husband's who have been playing for many years. They are very encouraging and helped me get started and also choose a Red Screamer of my own which recently came in the mail. I know I'm a fiddler for life now and I'm so grateful I took a chance and followed my instincts.

I think prodigy is over-rated and late-blooming is under-valued. If we didn't start things later in life we'd miss the great pleasures--and brain-health--that come with continuing to learn. That's what keeps us young!

Go for it!

What a wonderful story, I also am a guitar convert. I played classical guitar for over twenty years and never really warmed up to it.

When I finally got up the nerve to play the violin it was an epiphiany.

Regards,

Don Crandall

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I agree with all that has been posted on this subject. PICK UP THAT FIDDLE AND YOU WILL NEVER BE ABLE TO PUT IT DOWN FOR LONG.

I notice that I have the best time now that I am learning the violin -- it is so much fun to go to the symphony and watch the violin section - even though I get jealous when someone has started playing as early as 8 years of age. (well, if they are 28, they have been playing for 20 years, so they should sound GREAT!)

QUIT TALKING ABOUT IT AND JUST DO IT!!!! YOU WILL LOVE IT!!!!!!!

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You know, it is really great to see such a strong vote of support for late bloomers (myself included)! Get someone you feel good about that knows how to play well. Contact your local university or search out a teacher through the school system. Read as many technical books as you can find on bow holds, left hand etc., and USE this with what you are shown by experienced players. Experiment. You can do it.

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