Jump to content

music paper?


oldsubguy
 Share

Recommended Posts

MelBay makes music paper. I have a pad downstairs. All it has on it is sets of 5 lines, nothing else. It's wonderful. You can get it in standard 8 1/2 X 11 size, or 8 1/2 X 14, and probably other sizes. I always get mine at the closest sheet music store, Pender's Music. If you can't find any at a local store, Pender's has a website, and I'm sure you could order some.

Aaron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by falstaff:


This is a nice little program for just jotting down some tunes. I use Finale 2002 and it is the best thing since sliced bread. If you get into some intense orchestration and composition I highly recommend that you purchase the latest version of Finale. It's easy to use and will do just about anything you need to do with notation.

Don Crandall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried this finale notepad a bit, like 20 minutes, and couldn't find how to utilize strictly the keyboard (computer keyboard) for über-fast note entry. Unless I can find how to (if at all possible), I will stick with Noteworthy - it just can't be beat in speed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think you can enter the notes themselves from the computer keyboard. But you can use the keyboard shortcuts for changing the note lengths, sharps and flats, etc. Make sure the Simple Entry palettes are turned on. There are numbers next to the pictures of the eighth, quarter, etc. notes (i.e., a quarter note is 5). Use those numbers on the keyboard to switch note lengths. Use the s key to sharp a note, the f to flat, the n to add a natural sign, etc. I write with my right hand on the mouse to drop in the notes and my left hand on the keyboard to change the time values, etc. I agree that it's a little clunky but you get what you pay for and it goes quickly once you are used to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a tech coordinator and part of my job is to help the other teachers integrate tech into their classes...but we don't force them in any way. Finale Notepad led to my "tech success story" of the year because I discovered it when I needed it for my after-school string ensemble and then I got the 8th grade music teacher to use it with his classes for their compositions. Now he is completely addicted to it. We are getting a new arts wing which will include a digital keyboard lab with Finale 2002 (or whatever it is by then), and now he'll be quite good at it.

I am telling this tale partly because he is not a teacher who shuns technology, but he's not one that is a big techno whiz, either. So if he can use Finale Notepad and then 2002 with only a little help from me, anyone else competent enough to get on this board and post a message can, too!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by oldsubguy:

Anyone know how/where to get blank music paper that one could write their own notes on? Have several song that are 6 pages long which i could condense by just putting melody on less pages.

I found an old fashioned and rather charming way to do this:

Barnes and Noble (store only) sells reproductions of antique pens. They carry dip pen kit for writing music. The nib has five ink holder points on it. The kit comes with ink and paper for $16.95 but I think that the manuscript nib is sold alone for something like $11.95. The ink that comes in the kit is crappy so I purchased some Waterman ink. The colors of ink available are wonderful. I chose Havanna Red (a reddish-brown) and a Purple.

It's very easy to make the staff lines and really looks beatiful especially with different papers.

Have fun smile.gif

M/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son's school music theory lab has a room full of synthesizers, each with its own computer and flat screen monitor connected to the Internet. I was truly impressed. They use Finale 2002. My son asked me to get him a copy so I bought one on eBay, a sealed full academic version of Finale 2002. It is fully registerable (new word?) and only cost me $220. Although the ad said you had to have academic credentials to buy it, I was never asked for them.

[This message has been edited by rainyann (edited 01-14-2002).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Eclectic Lady:

I found an old fashioned and rather charming way to do this:

Barnes and Noble (store only) sells reproductions of antique pens. They carry dip pen kit for writing music. The nib has five ink holder points on it. The kit comes with ink and paper for $16.95 but I think that the manuscript nib is sold alone for something like $11.95. The ink that comes in the kit is crappy so I purchased some Waterman ink. The colors of ink available are wonderful. I chose Havanna Red (a reddish-brown) and a Purple.

It's very easy to make the staff lines and really looks beatiful especially with different papers.

Have fun
smile.gif

M/

My god, don't do this. I wish that I had had Finale when I was in school studying composition. The hours I labored over manuscript and parts was a horrid waste of time. This is akin to using a typerwriter after having used a powerful word processor.

The software they have now Finale, Sibelius, and the like allows you to manipulate notation so rapidly that it frees you to be much more creative than suffering through manual notation.

If Mozart had had Finale he would have written 3 times as many masterpieces than he did.

Hand written score is quaint and can be beautiful, but it is a relic from another age. One should be able to notate clearly manually, but for production and manipulation it is grossly inefficient.

Respectfully,

Don Crandall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Mozart had had Finale he would have written 3 times as many masterpieces than he did.

Hand written score is quaint and can be beautiful, but it is a relic from another age. One should be able to notate clearly manually, but for production and manipulation it is grossly inefficient.

Respectfully,

Don Crandall

[/b]

Great point! I'm only writing out yet another arrangement of "Twinkle" smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Eclectic Lady:

If Mozart had had Finale he would have written 3 times as many masterpieces than he did.

Hand written score is quaint and can be beautiful, but it is a relic from another age. One should be able to notate clearly manually, but for production and manipulation it is grossly inefficient.

Respectfully,

Don Crandall

Great point! I'm only writing out yet another arrangement of "Twinkle" smile.gif[/b]

Well bully for you!

Incidentally have you heard the variations Mozart did on that catchy little tune?

I think they are brilliant.

Hand writing out (in pencil) can be a great learning exercise when studying a composition. Ink always frightened the heck out of me though as there is no nice way to really erase an error.

smile.gif

Don Crandall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...