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About etude....


yiugn
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quote:

Originally posted by yiugn:

What etude is most effective to intermediate level student? I am practicing Carl Flesh scales, but I don't know how I should practice bowing........

I would recommend Sevcik op.2. You will find great etudes with plenty of bow variations in there.

Another option, since you mentioned intermediate level: Kayser. I think it`s the best among pre-Kreutzer books, if you want to develop bow technique.

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quote:

Originally posted by yiugn:

What etude is most effective to intermediate level student? I am practicing Carl Flesh scales, but I don't know how I should practice bowing........

The best bowing studies out there are found in the Casorti etudes book...it's ALL about bowing.

roman

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I'll be a little different and recommend two books by Mary Cohen

- Technique Takes Off

- Technique Flies High

These two books contain bowing and other etudes that are very lyrical while at the same time focused on the development of technique. Both arms are used and there are a variety of bowing studies. What I like about them is that they are essentially unaccompanied etudes in the nature of preludes but geared to improvement of technique while giving the benefit of also being employed as small show pieces.

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Kreutzer is a great etude book. 1, 2/3, 6/7, 8, 13, 14, and 28-31 are very good for bowing in particular. Most editions have bowing variations for 2, 3, and 8. Try #13 slurring 4 or 8 notes per bow. #9 is good for the wrist if you finger the whole thing so you have to cross strings for each note. (The first measure would be 2030 instead of 2434 or 1323.) 8 and 10 are good for spiccato or long slurs since they contain so much string crossing.

Casorti, Sevcik Op. 2 (if I remember the right one), and Hubay's 6 bowing etudes are good, but I think the same concepts can be covered doing Kreutzer w/ bowing variations. Casorti is a nice change, as are Dont Op. 37, Fiorillo, and Mazas.

Long tones are a great bowing excercise: try to sustain an open string for as long as you can in one bow, keeping the tone absolutely even. 30 seconds per bow is a good goal; Josef Gingold could sustain a very soft tone for something like 5 minutes.

Martele is also very good for your bow arm. It's covered in Kreutzer etudes 6 and 7.

You can do bowings with scales, too. 3 notes down and 1 up, 1 note down and 3 up, 3 notes up and 1 down, and 1 note up and 3 down are very helpful to bowing if you try to make the 1 note as loud (or soft) as the longer 3-note slur and without accenting it. Instead of slurring 3 notes, you can also do 2, 5, or even 7.

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