Sign in to follow this  
Viola Girl

Recording devices

Recommended Posts

I am in search of a portable recording device that I could bring to lessons and utilize in my practice sessions that has a very good and CLEAR sound quality, but is not too complicated or too expensive. I looked at MP3 players and well...they look very complicated and very expensive! frown.gif

Do any of you have any suggestions??

Thanks,

VG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there!

I have heard of people sneaking mini disk recorders into concerts to make bootleg recordings...

I think the sound is good but Im not really sure how good.

I found one here but im quite sure there are cheaper ones elsewhere, but MAYBE this suggestion could be pointing you in the right direction?

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/sid=02...l/base_id/56072

Anyone out there have a postivie experience with portable mini disk recorders?

Any leads to a possible cheaper source?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I should pipe in on this one. I received a MZR-700 portable minidisc recorder for Christmas. It was purchased at Best Buy. I then ordered an ECM-MS907 stereo mike from sonystyle.com http://www.sonystyle.com/electronics/prd.jsp?pid=245

Last Wednesday I went to a jam session and recorded it. The sound quality is top notch. It sounded CD quality to me. You can record a maximum of 74 minutes a disc and I think that minidiscs are about a couple bucks apiece.

Minidisc player is about $250

Microphone: $100

Hope this helps,

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like minidisk recording because you can mark spots on the disk and then return to them very fast. Also, you can erase sections you don't want to keep.

Only problem is that I think MD is on the way out as a recording medium. The stores are dropping their MD recorders in favor of CD burners and MP-3 machines. So I wouldn't put a big investment into MD gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you record on a portable CD player or MP3 player through a microphone? If one exists please post the link. I think that this is what Viola Girl was looking for.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the md player/recorders are on their way out, I will be disappointed. I love mine. It is so easy to record and carry around. Instead of my CD player which is bigger, I like the md because it fits in a pocket or purse easily. You can also carry more discs in less room. I guess I should go out and buy more blank discs while I still can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve-

The two items you're describing don't exist in commercial forms. Minidiscs and DAT recorders are the only CD quality portable recorders widely used now. I highly recommend Minidisc recorders. Mine cost $150 from the Sony factory store, and its recording quality is just unbelievably good.

--Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies, you all! I was thinking about a minidisc recorder, however I guess I was confused with the MP3 players -- I thought they were one in the same, and they looked incredibly complicated. But now that know that they are two different devices, I will check out those web addresses for a minidisc specifically...

Thanks again!

VG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you hook your Sony minidisc recorder/player to your audio system? I need to preserve some very old cassettes and I'd like to do it on minidisc, but I'm having some trouble figuring out how to make the recording. My CD burner is part of the computer, not the audio system, so I don't see a way to record them on CD.

Thanks for any info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just felt a need to clear something up. I do a LOT of field recording, have done some engineering for band releases, and am pretty familiar with all the recording gear out there. Mini-Disk is NOT CD quality; it sounds good for what it is, but MD works by using a compression scheme to get all the music onto the disk. MDrs claim that it is "lossless compression", but it isn't. The MD compression scheme drops certain frequencies; if you know what to listen for, you can definitely hear it. DAT is the only current lossless digital recording medium, unless you invest in a hard disk recorder or laptop based recording system. As someone who deals with MDers on a frequent basis at concerts by bands that allow recording, like Widepsread Panic or Phil Lesh, I hate Mini-disk because it tends to be a pain to get MD into the recording chain. Also, DAT has the advantage of continuous 3 hour recording times available, whereas with MD you have to switch the **** disk every 74 minutes, and it usually ends up happening in the middle of a great song or jam.

Having ranted, I will say that if you are just recording sessions so you can learns tunes, MD is a good way to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think for the intended purpose, the MD format is just fine. It's leagues better than tape, it's portable (one of Viola Girl's criteria), and I doubt seriously that for her purposes, the data compression will be an issue.

For a real difference, she'll need a good microphone to go with the MD unit, that's all.

I'm surprised you recommend DAT, as DAT is well on the way out also. HD is taking over the portable multitrack/mixdown realm (to say nothing of laptops with protools). Even so, I know of no HDs that are simple and basic; they're all multitrack/mixdown machines. Those that are proliferating from Roland, Boss, Korg, Akai, etc. come with features and attendant complexity/cost. (I'm guessing she only wants to record and do no mixdown.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, thanks for all the information! I am really looking for the most SIMPLE device as possible -- I am not "technologically-hip" in any way. I even considered the good ol' tape recorder, however I feared the sound quality would be horrible.

I just want to record lessons/practice sessions so that I may hear myself in a more unbiased light, and be able to fix elements in my playing more quickly and efficiently.

Thanks,

VG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last summer I was looking for a small recorder to record my lessons and occasionally myself. I settled on the Sony

TCS-60DV Cassette-Corder with ACE30HG adaptor (the only adaptor authorized by Sony for use with the TCS60DV). I tried a different adaptor (the people that sold me the recorder supplied it), but it caused a hum, so if you get this INSIST on this adaptor. I'm sure it's not DAT quality, and may not even be the quality you're looking for, but I'm pleased with it. My criteria were that it would catch my teacher's voice clearly so that I could remember what she said -- the music quality was less important to me. For "listening to myself" as a self-teaching aid, I've found even my 25-year old el cheapo Panasonic SlimLine cassette recorder to be helpful. The Sony is, of course, worlds better (and should be at the price). The Sony is also nice and small, but it has the advantage of using normal cassette tapes, so I can listen to them in my car stereo. ...Just my two cents' worth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also listen to my minidisc recorder/player in my car with one of those car cassette adaptors. It looks like a cassette. You put it in the cassette player and plug the other end into the minidisc player. It plays back through your car stereo speakers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also recieved a minidisc player with a mic for Xmas. So far I love the ease and quality of the recordings--I taped my entire lesson--mine has different recording speeds-up to 5 hours.

A question for those of you who ar more familiar with these devices--I have been unable to get it to work with my computer--it came with a digital pc link which I believe I have working , but the player keeps saying no "signal". Any suggestions?

Thanks Eileen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by EDG:

I also recieved a minidisc player with a mic for Xmas. So far I love the ease and quality of the recordings--I taped my entire lesson--mine has different recording speeds-up to 5 hours.

A question for those of you who ar more familiar with these devices--I have been unable to get it to work with my computer--it came with a digital pc link which I believe I have working , but the player keeps saying no "signal". Any suggestions?

Thanks Eileen

After you connect the digital pc link box to the computer via usb it should ask you to insert the windows cd. This will load the required drivers. Next, connect the optical cable between the pc link and the optical input of the minidisc. Try it on mp3's first. It will say no signal until you start play on your jukebox player. There shouldn't be any sound out of your speakers if it is setup right.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting and timely post--I just recorded (old cassette recorder) myself to send out west to my mom. When I played it back it sounded as if I had mega vibrato. Regretfully, I have not yet even mastered a mini vibrato, so I'm assuming it is the quality of the recording equipment and just logged on to post that question. OR do I secretly have vibrato, but am the only one who cannot hear it? shocked.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mystery vibrato? It's the equipment. I have some pretty decent recording equipment for playing other instruments. But my violin playing is nowhere near "that" level, so for violin, and to critique my practice, I just use a no-name, cheapy cassette recorder with built-in mic. That little recorder puts a vibrato on everything -- piano, guitar, bass, you name it. (I checked out a suspicion one day...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about getting the Sony Walkman model D3, which records on standard (old-fashioned) cassette tape. It's not manufactured any more, but you can get them refurbished w/ a Sony warranty. It's supposed to have been the best thing going in its day. It has manual recording level adjustment (which a musician friend of mine tells me a recorder really ought to have).

So do you think am I being hopelessly old-fashioned going with a standard cassette recorder, or does this format still make sense these days?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.