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Unsung heroes


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A few years ago, I realized who we all should be admiring, and maybe more so then those who record and are famous. The teachers. Sometimes they still play in symphonies, but oftentimes not, but are wonderful players. Sometimes, even better than those who ARE famous.

Example 1: my junior high school orchestra director basically had no teacher in high school, but she managed to get a full-ride scholarship to DePaul, as a performance major. She also got a full-ride from Northern, but DePaul offered to give her a viola to play on while she was in college. However, she developed horrible tendonitis(sorry if I misspelled), and had to settle for double majoring in performance and music ed, because she wouldn't be able to practice as hard. She is often payed to play principal in orchestras in the area still.

Example 2: My private teacher my senior year in high school also double majored in performance and music ed, and was working on getting her masters degree in ed while I was studying with her, and she taught some of the students of one of the principals of the CSO, and always ended up with principal chair in the orchestra. She was also a wonderful teacher.

Example 3: I knew my teacher in college was a wonderful teacher, but had never heard him play. In February, I went to his recital and was in awe of his ability. He played the 6th Bach cello suite better then a recording I had purchased. I'd like to know if anyone else agrees with me, or even disagrees with me. I welcome any responses.

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No one got famous teaching. Even the truly great teachers are only famous within musical circles. Even then, some great ones are overlooked because they don't play political games or go looking around for students who will make them look good.

Once there was a boy who excelled in school. Then when he was around 12 years old, his mother died of cancer. His performance in school went down the tube. One of his teachers never gave up on his bad behavior and poor grades. At the end of the year when students were giving teachers presents, the boy gave the teacher a nearly empty bottle of perfume with a cheap rhinestone bracelet around it. Both belonged to the boy's mother. The teacher wore the bracelet and put on some of the perfume in spite of snickers from the other students. The boy later thanked her, because it reminded him of his mother. High school and college went by. After finishing medical school, the young man sent the teacher a note: "we did it!" Then the teacher was invited to his wedding. She went, and after the ceremony the groom thanked her. She was the only "family" from the groom's side since his father had already passed away.

-Aman

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No actually, University of Illinois @ Urbana-Champaign. Sorry, I can't give you any reccomendations for that area, only a few around Illinois. Good luck in finding a teacher! And Vieuxtemps, I appreciated your story, thank you.

[This message has been edited by U of I violist (edited 05-08-2001).]

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quote:

Originally posted by Jon Griffith:

U of I, I agree. I imagine this means you go to University of Idaho? I am moving to Moscow in Fall, do you have any recommendations for violin teachers?

Jon, I am from Idaho -- I did not go to U of I, however let me ask around for you in regards to a teacher. I am not sure who is uo there now.

The violin instructor at BSU graduated from Eastman and NEC, and is my former teacher. Also, there are many great violinists in the valley.

VG

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My teacher went overtime on my lessons every week while I was preparing for auditions/concerts. One week, she taught me as soon as she got back from outpatient surgery that morning. Another week, she canceled every student but me, because she was very ill with laryngitis (what a lesson!). Everything about my playing has benefitted from her instruction. She is my hero, but not just for what she does for me.

She has the best grasp of technique and expression I have seen; even though she is only an orchestra member smile.gif(assistant concertmaster) I have a feeling that she can evaluate the "great" soloists that play with the orchestra pretty keenly. If she had the time to prepare a recital of solo works, she could be right up there with anyone currently performing; I know she has the technical ability AND the interpretive skills.

She hasn't told me this, by the way smile.gif, but the more I learn, the more I realize how great she is. Do I lament her lack of fame? I think what she is doing now in her private teaching is greater for the world of music as

than the work of almost any hot-shot university professor.

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quote:

Originally posted by vieuxtemps:

No one got famous teaching. Even the truly great teachers are only famous within musical circles. Even then, some great ones are overlooked because they don't play political games or go looking around for students who will make them look good.

Once there was a boy who excelled in school. Then when he was around 12 years old, his mother died of cancer. His performance in school went down the tube. One of his teachers never gave up on his bad behavior and poor grades. At the end of the year when students were giving teachers presents, the boy gave the teacher a nearly empty bottle of perfume with a cheap rhinestone bracelet around it. Both belonged to the boy's mother. The teacher wore the bracelet and put on some of the perfume in spite of snickers from the other students. The boy later thanked her, because it reminded him of his mother. High school and college went by. After finishing medical school, the young man sent the teacher a note: "we did it!" Then the teacher was invited to his wedding. She went, and after the ceremony the groom thanked her. She was the only "family" from the groom's side since his father had already passed away.

-Aman

I think you touched something in me with this story. There have been many wonderful teachers in my life. I would say I am a product of all of them. When one invests love, guidance, and encouragement into another, the rewards are often very wonderful indeed. I think it is from this realization that some become teachers. I have always felt that those who dedicate their life to teaching sense this wonderful obligation and desire to return it.

A life spent in such a persuit is one spent well.

DC

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