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Journey

When your heart is not in it. . .can you fake it?

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I have often thought that you could not fake your heart being in it, but I do believe that maybe you can fake it a LITTLE bit. Here is why: my teacher had asked me to play a certain piece for my recital. I do not particularly like this piece. But, while practicing, she told me that I needed to put my heart into it. After a few weeks, she was convinced that my heart was in it. I, out of all people know that most certainly it was not, but to her, it sounded like I was putting my heart into it. So, I would consider this a certain degree of 'fake heart'. There is no way that somebody could fake putting in their heart for real, but I do think that there is a certain degree of technique/ability that one can put into the piece that will deceive SOME people's ears into making them hear that it is truly from your heart. What are your thoughts on this?

Just to let you know, my heart goes fully into the regular tunes that I play, but if there is a piece that I do not like, just like anyone else on here, my heart really does not go in it. Give me a tune I love, and I'll give you the music from my heart.

Journ

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good points!!

I still think you can tell when a player has their heart in it but there is an element of faking. I guess there has to be in the professional world because as an amateur I have days when I don't want to play a piece which I would normally love and surely the professional psyche experiences the same feelings but on a day when they have no choice but to play it. Do we interpret what WE feel or what the performer feels...or a bit of both? This could get v. philosophical!! crazy.gif

Stephen

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Try putting your heart into the every single one of the sounds that come out of your instrument, regardless of their sequence or rhythm. This usually works for me, even when I start out feeling like a total hack.

Admittedly, co-workers who play in tune can expedite the process a lot. The May 7 issue of Newsweek has a cover story that could help us think rationally about this mystery.

[This message has been edited by Marie Brown (edited 05-05-2001).]

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Mommy told me that back in the 1920s, the flapper motto was "If you can't be with the one you love, love the one you're with!"

TV and movies makes it clear that this has been increasingly the modern mantra for our society.--SO, why not for music too?

Andy

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Good point Mr. Victor. I saw a concert of the Elgar violin concerto with Midori as the soloist. She swayed about as if she was demon posessed and about to throw up at the same time. Perhaps her heart was in it, but I think that is an example of putting some extra heart in it, as we can prove by example of the old artists that excessive bodily movement isn't essential to having one's heart in the music.

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One of the best quotes I've heard this year by Nadja Salerno Sonneburg at a Mastersclass-

"There is too much music to play music which does not capture your heart-if you don't like it don't play it, people don't want to hear another uninspired concerto. Play the music you love, there is plenty out there." This is paraphrased, but the point was well taken. My son's teacher asks him, "What do you want to play.?" Knowing he will work harder if his "heart" is in it. He currently is working on the Sibelius Violin Concerto because he loves that piece and his "heart" is in it.

[This message has been edited by Bert (edited 05-05-2001).]

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Bert: I wish I could only play music my heart's in. But my teacher insists there's music I have to learn. I try to make the Bach a minor sound exciting even if I'm thinking "this is exciting, one less time to play this boring and easy piece."

Besides, my heart's in music that's beyond my ability to play. (I think that without sufficent technique you can't get the musical message across even if you know what you're saying...wait, wrong thread. wink.gif)

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Here's what I do when I see a violinist play with orchestra. The 1st movement of the concerto I focus on the violinist's HANDS (to see how good their technique is). The second movement I shut my eyes and listen (2nd movements are great for hearing how much Heart the soloist is playing with). The 3rd movement is a combination of watching Hands and listening with my eyes closed. I'm not impressed with the Walking-all-over stage "antics" that some do to try to impress the audience (Sarah Chang).

Faking musicality? I don't think so, but you can fool a stupid audience into thinking so.

Well, that's my two cents.

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I think when it comes to solo music, you shouldn't perform a piece of music that you do not enjoy. That doesn't mean you shouldn't learn such pieces to get them under your belt, but when it comes to selecting music for a recital or other performance, what's the point of picking a piece that requires you to fake the energy? I for one would not want to waste an opportunity to perform for an audience by playing music that is uninspiring to me.

I think all of us end up playing music we can't stand from time to time in orchestral situations. That's when it's perfectly acceptable and even admirable to fake some enthusiasm. As an orchestra teacher, I've discovered that students love to complain. The music is too easy, too hard, too fast, too slow, to long, too short, too many flats, boring viola part crazy.gif... you name it, I've heard it! What I tell them: if it's too hard, practice. If it's too easy, then play it right. If you don't like it, pretend that you do wink.gif!

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I guess you can fake a little smile.gif ... I think even Itzhak Perlman does that (I don't like "some" of his recordings... but I LOVE MOST OF THEM!) I think it's really impossible to feel everything everytime. Too bad there's no cure or solution to that problem frown.gif

originally quoted by Journey:

There is no way that somebody could fake putting in their heart for real, but I do think that there is a certain degree of technique/ability that one can put into the piece that will deceive SOME people's ears into making them hear that it is truly from your heart

Maybe it could also depend on the music-appreciation-level of the listener (how much exposure to classical music they get and how much they understand music). I think the more exposed you are to good classical music, it's much much harder to deceive the listener....

...BUT STILL, if you do not feel your message that much, then I think it won't have TOO MUCH impact on the heart of the listener. Probably the ears can be deceived but not the heart smile.gif

Regina

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There is no challenge or growth in loving your lover. How you come to terms with and deal with your in-laws is another matter. Familiarity breeds affection as well as contempt.

From a practical side a professional will learn to play any piece to the best of his or her ability. Everyone must eat a peck of dirt before they die.

On the other hand every piece of music I have ever played or been part of has taught me something, even when I was too arrogant or stupid to realize it. I try to find the "lesson" in pieces I am not fond of and focus on that. Sometimes I have even shocked myself and grown to like the proverbial "spinach."

You may not like it now but ten years from now you may adore it.

Never say never.

Happy Fiddlin'

DC

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quote:

Originally posted by Andrew Victor:

Mommy told me that back in the 1920s, the flapper motto was "If you can't be with the one you love, love the one you're with!"

Andy

Here I thought this phrase was coined in the 60's, ala the Crosby, Stills and Nash tune.

Just shows that in human relationships there isn't much new under the sun.

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quote:

Originally posted by DoggieLove:

I guess you can fake a little
smile.gif
... I think even Itzhak Perlman does that

Why do you think that?

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I don't think you can or should try to fake too much.

It demands so much emotional energy to play something really properly, as well as to know intuitively how it should really be played, that when you lose the feeling, you can only play from emotional memory, in which case, most of it is forgotten inadvertantly.

[This message has been edited by staylor (edited 05-08-2001).]

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I never know what people will feel when I play.

Sometimes, I get really excited with the music I`m doing, but the audience doesn`t feel that way.

Sometimes, I`m just bored and waiting it to get finished(maybe "faking" a little, but mostly bored), and someone comes to me to say it was really moving(???).

I think it`s difficult to predict things like that.

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If your heart had to be in every piece of music you play, every time you played it, most of the time you would either be musically listless or physically exhausted. I think you spend a lot of time developing your technique, your musicality, and your sound so that you DON'T have to be at an emotional bursting point to bring out the emotional power in a piece.

My .02.

Trent

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