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What is a drone???


ecology
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A Drone is the name of a "buzz bomb" the kind of pilotless guided bomb that the Germans sent over Great Britain during WWII. It gets it's name from the sound that it made - a long (undecipherable melodically) tone (think of the term as it is used to describe someone who is incessantly talking on and on about nothing) that is a dreary dull monotonous monotone. Bagpipe are able to produce a splendid example of a long monotone of this type.

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In fiddle music, a drone is offen an open string played at the same time with melody notes that are played on an adjacent string. I.E. an easy double stop. Sometimes the fourth finger is used instead i.e. a on the d sting with melody notes on the a string.

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quote:

Originally posted by DIRK:

In fiddle music, a drone is offen an open string played at the same time with melody notes that are played on an adjacent string. I.E. an easy double stop. Sometimes the fourth finger is used instead i.e. a on the d sting with melody notes on the a string.

Aaaaah...thank you, Dirk!

And...

...thanks to everyone else for your myriad of explanations! Especially the bagpipe explanation, that really sums it up!

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I'm almost embarrassed to mention this because I cannot site the exact place in all of Bach but there is a wonderful gavotte which uses a drone of one note in the trio. It is one which begins in minor and goes to the parallel major and the drone is the tonic in the major key. As I said, it's embarrassing to not remember....anyway, a drone can be several things-all those mentioned and more.

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a tuning that fiddlers often use in the keys of A and D is to tune up the G string to an A this adds an automatic drone harmonic resonance to the violin and enhances the depth remarkably.Of course the string can be bowed whenever possile with the melody notes to add an "easy" double stop, guaranteed to harmonize.

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quote:

Originally posted by fiddlefaddle:

a tuning that fiddlers often use in the keys of A and D is to tune up the G string to an A ...

Oh, hey!

That is a cool idea. I think I will try that!

I am currently working a duet for flute and violin for lesson, its called Romance and I forget the composer, but-

I mainly am learning to play Ashokan Farewell on my own. I am exploring alot of fiddling right now. I must say, fiddling is really helping me improvise and really "hear" alot more.

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quote:

Originally posted by Ken Nielsen:

- a long (undecipherable melodically) tone (think of the term as it is used to describe someone who is incessantly talking on and on about nothing) that is a dreary dull monotonous monotone.

Ken, you don't really sound appreciative of this sound at all!

What types of music do you like to play, and do you play violin or viola??


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There's a "drone" in the 3rd movement of Mozart's 3rd Violin Concerto in G maj. (open D against notes on the A string).

The Appalachian (mountain) dulcimer is traditionally played with two open drone strings; only the top string (or strings if it is a 4-string dulcimer) is traditionally used for the melody. The interval between the drones depends upon which mode one is using for tuning.

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Ann, you're not thinking of the E Major Partita first half of Minuet 2, are you? There's also quite a bit of holding of notes (you might call it droning) in the Gavotte in Rondo of the same Partita, but these are usually above the melody - does that count? smile.gif

Also, check out the g minor Sonata Fugue measures 38-40 and 69-73

In the d minor Chaconne, measures 229-240

I second iupviolin's suggestion to listen to the 20th Paganini caprice if you don't know it. I love that piece smile.gif

Jesse

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quote:

Originally posted by ecology:

Hey!

What exactly is a drone and when and how is it used?

Thanks

Sabrina

A drone is a male bee.

I believe gathering nectar is its main function. Also it is not prone to complaining when asked to remove the trash as are human males.

LOL

wink.gif

Don Crandall

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If you sit quitely in front of a bee hive you will hear an excellent organic example of a drone sound; many little buzzings with a deeper resonant, sympathetic sound. BTW, the drones provide spearm for the Queen. All the worker bees are female and they gather the nectar and pollen.

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ecology, you are right. I thought about that post after I had posted it and it was not exactly an uplifting example. I appologize and offer a better example along with the bagpipe would also be the Sitar (Ravi Shankar recordings for reference.) I originally was thinking of all of the offhand references to the word "drone" of which there are many. I play violin and will be attending the annual Scottish Highland Games in our community where we have a blast playing traditional Scottish tunes with near 50 violinists together - I guarantee you that there will be plenty of "droaning" that goes on as it really adds to the effect of Scottish music to imitate the sound of the bagpipes with the violins.

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(Still embarrassed) I think the piece I'm referring to is either an orchestral piece or a transcription of an organ piece, organ being especially sympathetic to the concept of the drone because you can plant your toe and proceed with some other body part, but that begs the question 'Is a pedal point always a drone?' I think yes, but a drone I think is not always a pedal point. In the case of Bach, who cares?

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Ann - Gavotte and Musette from the English Suite #5 (or #3 -- it's listed one way in the violin part and the other way in the cello part -- International strikes again!)? (at least that is the one that springs to my mind). I play Hussonmorel's version of it for violin and cello. Gliere also wrote a Gavotte and Musette for violin & cello.

[This message has been edited by D_A (edited 04-25-2001).]

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