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If you know how to speak/write Irish/Gaelic, please help me!!!


Journey
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I am trying to translate these phrases into Irish/Gaelic, but I don't know how. If you know how, could you please help me?

Phrases:------------------------

In My Heart

Where I Belong

Rescued

Hold Me

A Touched Heart

Memories

--------------------

Thank-you very much. This will really help me out.

Journ

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Ta gaeilge beagan agam. smile.gif"><P>it

sa mo chor

ta me san ait a ba cheam dom

shabhail

coinnigh me

na croi bhain leis

na taithi

there should be 'accents' over the first e and third a in the second line, the two a's in line 3, the e in line 4, the fist a and firs i in line 5 and the first a and last i in line 6

if anyone else feels better about their gaelic, please speak up! smile.gif

best of luck!

oh, a note on pronunciation(if you care), the mh is pronounced like a w, the ch is pronounced like you're clearing your throat, the sh is pronounced like an h. those are the big one's anyway smile.gif

[This message has been edited by MacCeol (edited 04-06-2001).]

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quote:

Originally posted by caleb:

Journey: you got my curiousity up. what's it for? do you have to say it or just write it? saying it sounds tough!

Caleb: I know, I know..it is kind-of strange for me to ask such a question, isn't it? smile.gif

Well, I just recently composed a tune that sounds very much like an Irish air. Those phrases that I wrote down are thoughts for titles, but I don't want the title to be in English, but rather the language of the Irish. I picked those titles specifically because each of those titles mean something special to me---they kind of tell a story about something that I have experienced. I always name my tunes so that they tell a story---to me at least, and to everyone that was involved in that story.

So, that is what it is all about. As far as whether I have to write them or say them....well....kind-of a little of both. I have to be able to pronounce them when I play that tune for people, and I have to write them when I put the name on the music. laugh.gif

MacCeol:

Thank-you so much!! This will help out incredibly! Is there any way that you can help me pronouce them? Like, do all of the letters sound like the English letters? Also, what does an accented e, a, or i sound like? This is incredible!

I want to learn how to speak Gaelic, someday.... crazy.gif Where did you learn how to speak the language?

Thanks again so much,

Journ

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well, for starters, ta gaeilge beagan agam means "i have a little gaelic." if i were a fluent speaker, i would have said "ta gaeilge agam," but i don't have all of it and i don't remember all of what i did once have : )

i took my course through harvard's summer program but there are various ways to learn, and one of the most highly recommended would be the "teach yourself" series. one thing to watch for, gaelic means scottish gaelic(generally), and a course in irish will be called just that(or more likely, modern irish)

as for pronunciation, it's sorta complicated. i'll try and 'phoneticize' a couple of these, but it will not likely be much help. if you think you'd prefer one title over another, that might be easier. so, here we go:

sa mho chor

=

"sa whoa chor" (where ch is the 'clearing your throat' sound you might associate with german)

shábháil

=

"ha wyl" (although you really want to get that ái in the end)

coinnigh mé

=

"conni(gh) may" (let the gh be slightly pronounced but do not end with a "g" sound, and think french on that é)

if you'd like to hear some gaelic spoken(although i admit you probably won't understand much >i)

[This message has been edited by MacCeol (edited 04-06-2001).]

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Okay, I have it narrowed down to three choices that I like the best: "Where I Belong"/"In My Heart"/"A Touched Heart".

(Although, I will keep the list of the other phrases that you gave me for future reference.)

Thank-you!!

Journ

P.S. Randall: what do those words mean?

If you can't tell, I am so into all of this Irish stuff. It's a deep-held passion of mine. I don't know....it's just in my blood. laugh.gif

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Journey, if you do a search on the internet for gaelic, you will find a lot of "teaching" websites that will give you a good foundation, especially with the pronunciations and spellings. You can also choose between Scottish, Irish, and Manx, which can be quite different. I have plenty bookmarked, so if you wish, I'll write down the addresses and give them to you.

Later

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I'm sorta hoping mairead will chime in any moment now, cause with a name like that, i'm guessing she'll be able to help

Tapadh leat, a Mhaic. Gu dearbh, tha agam cuideachd an criomag na gàidhlige --ged chan eil an gràmar. smile.gif

But I really think Journ only said 'gaelic' because she knows that Irish falls into that language group and that most folk don't realise that today the name is conventionally meant to mean the scots version of the language. I shouldn't think for a moment that the Gaidhlig (as opposed to the Gaelige) would actually suit.

Journ, was it only a trick of the camera angle, or is your family of English/Saxon origin? You're surely Irish in your spirit, but are you at all Celtic in your family background?

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quote:

Originally posted by Mairead:

Journ, was it only a trick of the camera angle, or is your family of English/Saxon origin? You're surely Irish in your spirit, but are you at all Celtic in your family background?

Mairead,

Yes, there is Irish in my background. (Is that what you are asking?) What exactly is 'English/Saxon'. And, what in my features made you ask that question? I'm curious. It is pretty neat that you can guess something like that from just looking at me.

Journ

[This message has been edited by Journey (edited 04-07-2001).]

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I didn't really mean anything very exciting. It's only that you're blond and fair, and appear in the picture to have what I think of as a 'Saxon face', so I idly wondered if your love of Irish music comes all from your heart.

The Scots --perhaps the Irish too-- call the English 'Sassenach', which means 'Saxon'. As you doubtless know, the Saxons were the major group who came over from Scandinavia and the North-Sea coast to turf the Celts --Romano-Celts by then, really-- out of their land and into what's now Wales and Scotland. The Saxons, like their modern Scandinavian counterparts, were largely blond and fair.

[This message has been edited by Mairead (edited 04-07-2001).]

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I still think that that is neat, Mairead.

My grandfather was definitely Irish. Everybody always said that you could tell he was an Irishman by looking at him. I don't know exactly how much Irish he was, though.

The other day, I found an Irish site that let you search your Irish heritage. I input my last name and found that it was certainly an Irish name. So, that was pretty neat.

Lately, I have been entirely interested in my Irish heritage and Ireland. So, I have been doing a lot of searching on the subject. I guess you could say that Ireland is one of my 'hobbies'.

Journ

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MacCeol,

Having been married for 16 years, my wife assures me that anyone smart is female. Not being able to tell by the posts, I just assumed you were a "Nic" not a "Mac". Unfortunatly I'm not that up on my gaelic. It doesn't come that handy in So. Calif. Yes, "Ciamar a tha sibh?" is scots gaelic. It would be used for both plural and formal singular. "Ciamar a tha thu?", would be used for familiar singular. I'm not sure of the differences from Irish, Scots, Cape Breton and Welsh gaelic.

-Tapadh leat, Randy

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Gu dearbh, tha agam cuideachd an criomag na gàidhlige --ged chan eil an gràmar. smile.gif

i thought this was humorous, that's all!

randall-my memory may not serve me well, but gaelic does not follow the "plural/formal" kind of thing, it's just plural(tho as i said, i might not be remembering this properly)

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just a note on the the languages of the isles:

irish and scottish gaelic are somewhat alike, enough so that a fluent speaker of one can generally understand a fluent speaker of the other

manx, welsh etc. are rather different from scottish gaelic and irish, but they do share some phonetic qualities. i don't know about comprehension of the other languages tho as i have yet to hear much of either of them. cornish is another one that's in the same family, but again, i'm not sure in terms of cross-linguistic comprehension and phonetic resemblence. if i ever find my notes from class, i'll be sure to post the basics smile.gif

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MacCeol,

Welsh is a celtic language that is totally unrelated to Irish, Scots Gaelic. Manx and Cornish are of the same branch as Scots and Irish Gaelic. Welsh and Breton (Northern France) are of the same branch but as I said are as different as German and Italian from Irish and Scots Gaelic. I grew up in Ireland and studied Irish in school and up to first year College level.

I came upon the Raidio na Gaeltachta website and was so glad to be able to get Irish Gaelic radio into my room here in Miami. The wonders of technology.

Journey, listen to the real audio on this website and at least get familiar with the sounds. It can be intimidating at first because it is totally different to english. Ta suil agam go bhain tu taitneamh as an dteanga. Go dte sibh slan.

Peadar.

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we were briefly introduced to the various introductions in different dialects, and if i recall correctly Ciamar a tha sibh? would be scottish gaelic, tho isn't that plural? seems like our prof said ciamar a tha thu? would be for singular, but i don't remember well now. and as for Nic, is that not like Ní? that would be properly for a daughter, and as it stands, i am a son so for now, i'll stick with mac smile.gif

randall, if you're more up on your gaelic studies than i am(which would, unfortunately, not be much of a feat smile.gif ), could you give the scottish gaelic translation of those sayings? i'm just soo out of practice (and even then i was not too experienced)that i'm really scrapping.

[This message has been edited by MacCeol (edited 04-07-2001).]

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Okay, Journey, here we go...

1.There is a Celtic site that gives you celtic information galore. Go to the "self education menu", and there are alot of topics there, even about Irish history and Mythology. There is also a language portion that you can go through.

The site is: www.clannada.org/

2.There is a great pronunciation site that takes you through all of the vowels and combinations used in the language. I believe it has audio file examples as well, which show you exactly how to pronounce the letters. Its interesting, I must say!

The site is: www.klammeraffe.org/~brandy/gaelic/Kurs/aussprache.index.html.en

3.This is an Irish site that has lessons for you, and in the "general" link that you'll find on the first page, you'll find greetings, and even curses! Its an enjoyable site.

The site is: www.maths.tcd.ie/gaeilge/gaelic.html

4.This is an advanced site with readings and tests, and you hve to know what you're doing here. Check it out for some fun though.

The site is: nexus.brocku.ca/rogawa/gaelic

5.There is a big Manx site if you're interested in that language.

The site is: www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~kelly/menu.html#LESS

6.This is a general language info site for the gaelic languages. You'll have to sift through the links to find the good ones, but you'll be able to find some good dictionaries (always helpful) and generally important information in your language quest.

The site is: www.ceantor.org/

7.This site has lessons, very beginner. A good one to start with just to get your feet wet.

The site is: www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/ionnsachadh/bac/

I don't know if you can really learn to speak the language fluently with these sites (and the many others that are out there, so keep searching!) However, it will give you a good foundation for learning and an understanding of what you're getting into.

Good luck.

Oh, I guess we do think alike. I'm just happy to be able to help you in your quest. Just thank me when you win a grammy.

Any news on the dancing?

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quote:

Originally posted by High Strung:

Any news on the dancing?

Thank you sooooo much, High Strung!!! laugh.gif This will be great. I am going to look over those sites today (it might take me a little while, though). That is awesome!!

Oh, and about the dancing....unfortunately, my parents think that it would be a waste of time for me to learn dancing through videos. They don't understand how I want to dance. With school right now, I don't have a whole lot of time to learn to dance, either, to tell you the truth. But, I will have time this summer. And, I have a friend that is a very wonderful step-dancer. He lives a ways from me, but I wil get to see him in July. So, maybe I can get him to teach me the basics. (Hopefully)

How's your dancing going? Are you getting pretty good? Someday, if we ever meet, I want to see you dance.

Thanks again,

Journey smile.gif

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