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How many of you Professionals did Suzuki?


Tononi
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Im interested to know if the professionals on this board learned through Suzuki? In retrospect do you feel that this method was the best. I do not do Suzuki I have a Russian teacher are there points of Sukuki training that I should get more information on?

Thanks, Tony

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I've been playing violin for 20 years and I'm STILL playing Suzuki Book 1 every day.

Lately, I've been doing Suzuki 2.

Though I have Auer violin mechanics and a healthy dose of Galamian concepts in me, I'm still basically a Suzuki student when it comes down to playing by ear and by memory.

I use Suzuki to train my newbies.

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I have never used Suzuki though I have read his literature and looked at his method. There are many traditional methods that still hold validity today and which I think are solid foundation requirements. What I have found important about Suzuki was not so much his method as his philosophy.

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I did not start with Suzuki, but i believe i would have benifited if my teacher had been a little more open minded to other methods of teaching.

as far as memory goes...uhm..oh yea...mine sucks!

I used to think that memorizing etudes was much more difficult then "real music". In college, i got into fiddlin and discovered that i could not memorize fiddle tunes for the life of me. So i sat down and pondered... Fiddle tunes and etudes (to me) seem similar IN THAT there are many repetitive phrases or parts of phrases, and it is easy to let your mind turn off and let your fingers keep you going. But don't. If you can pick out one note here and there that keeps one passage different from the one before, then you have a better chance of keeping the whole tune strait in your head.

That's all i came up with, and that is probably why my memory is still not great -But the good news is...it has gotten better.

If you can sing a tune (or etude) from memory, you can probably play it.

Good Luck,

Amy

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Yes I think singing is very good. In addition focusing on primary notes in the phrase is good but sometimes I will begin the phrase and then end up confusing it with another. I suppose concerning the memorization issue perhaps my teacher has a valid point, each person probably learns to memorize music uniquely.

nemesis remarked... "What I have found important about Suzuki was not so much his method as his philosophy."

could you please elaborate on this if you see this post.

Thanks,

Tony

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I am not a professional, however I did have a comment about the Suzuki and the Russian school bit. I was pretty much a Suzuki student until recently, in that my left and right hand acted in the ways of a Suzuki student, and I also used the Suzuki material (supplemented with other stuff). Over the last year or so I have been trying to implement concepts of the "Russian" style of playing by reading over the fingerboard. I recently switched to a Russian teacher, I have learned more from him in a month than I could have from anyone else in a year. I only wish I could have started earlier.

Jonathan

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my experience with suzuki was that i had the privledge of learning lots of songs, other than that i had very porr techinque until i got a real teacher and started working with sevcik, flesch scales,concertos, mazas, etc..

oh ya the thing about memorization, i dont know if i have a good memory or just practice a lot, but usually after playing through it several times i have it well memorized...if you have a hard time maybe try making up a story or images in your mind that goes along with the music...that also helps with musical expression

[This message has been edited by Crushen (edited 04-05-2001).]

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I did Suzuki books 1-6. I regret not using the excercises in the books (especially tonalization!), and I probably didn't learn vibrato and note-reading when Suzuki said to do so. I believe that any musical talent I may have is due to the Suzuki method I started at age 3. Since it took me so long to learn how to practice, I play like a very unpolished 16-year violinist at best.

The concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra and the assistant principal 2nd violinist of the Atlanta Symphony learned Suzuki from their mothers. Koji Toyoda (Berlin Radio Orch) and Toshiya Eto (teaches at Toho school?) studied with Suzuki himself. I think Kyoko Takezawa was Suzuki-trained.

-Aman

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My introduction to strings after years as a wind player, was through Suzuki. It has helped my ear tremendously to use recordings as an aid to learning new pieces along with sightreading. I am a registered Suzuki teacher now, so obviously I like the method. But you can be a Suzuki student and still have the same technical repertoire as any other student. Suzuki isn't a particular school of technique; it's a way of learning.

- Brian

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I would be interested to know more about Suzuki "memory techniques.” Can one of you guys direct me to some literature on the subject. I have a Theory teacher and do quite a bit of ear training and Solfedge. My teacher insists on the memorization of my concerts, however he just informs me that I must find my own way of doing this.. Actually this is not altogether true... He stresses that I practice very slowly and attentively small sections of the piece... then eventually I will tie it all together. My theory teacher also explains to me about the basic structure of the piece melody variations, and repeats etc.

I generally practice a piece so much that I play the entire thing by memory however I tend to get lost... my fingers do all the work and my brain seems to do nothing.

One last thing... I find memorizing etudes much more difficult than concerts.

Good advice is much appreciated,

Thanks,

Tony

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quote:

Originally posted by Tononi:

does anyone out there ever visualize the score while playing my heart?

I sometimes do. Usually, I memorize things in my fingers, but when I can't think of what comes next I think of what the score looks like. My memorization technique is mostly "practice until you know it so well you just don't need the music." I play the piece with my eyes closed, opening them when I can't remember a phrase.

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Tononi... the reason you are able to memorize concerti more easily than etuden is because you listen to concerti (recordings). This is one of Suzuki's fundamental ideas. For those of you who've seen "The Music Man" it's similar to the "think method." When you have the piece memorized in your head without the fingerings, memorizing it technically will be simple (just slow practice)... This helps musicality. I'm semi-professional, but only a high school student, but I can say now, I found the Suzuki method to be incredibly helpful. I went all the way through book 10 on violin. If you can't find a Suzuki teacher and a "group lesson" the next best thing is to play as much chamber music as possible. Also, listen to recordings. This should be as much of a supplement of Suzuki as you need. All of Suzuki's books are excellent. Read any/all of them...

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Whenever I play, I know pretty much where on which page I am. My memory used to be finger patterns and technique (just notes!). That was the way I played the violin, so my performance was painfully lacking in expression and real music.

Now I have the tune going through my head as well, so I can keep track of where I am that way as well. (Finger patterns aren't as important in memory, but I rely partly on them whenever I follow set fingerings.) It helps to have heard the piece before, like with Wieniawski 2, Vieuxtemps 5, Zigeunerweisen, and Bruch 1. Good thing I heard those pieces back when I didn't have such a clear concept of style: I don't think I mimic recordings, but I've got some idea of what the orchestra does while I play (always a good thing). But with Viotti 22, Conus, and the Vitali Chaconne, I was more on my own. Same with solo Bach: for some reason I haven't listened to my Heieftz, Milstein, and Szigeti much.

Suzuki is one reason I memorize relatively painlessly. The other is because my "practice" used to be aimless run-throughs: I got the big picture but not the details.

-Aman

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