Jump to content

Mystery violinist guesses


lwl
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 123
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

But have you ever seen him live Longhair?

Reserve all judgements until you have.

And fire? Listen to that last note...stirs my soul. If no 18 isn't Vengerov, I'm going to look pretty stupid, but then tell me who it is and I might just start thinking of changing my allegiance.

Jane

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lydia!!

I was able to download. Hooray. It took time so - I only listened to #11 and #12 so far. My guess:

#11 - It's somebody young, and pretty contemporary. I'll say Chang or one of her colleagues from that school

#12 - I can tell you who it isn't: It is NOT HEIFETZ. The violinist plays with style from the era, but I'm not familiar enough with a huge variety of recordings - so I'll be interested to hear the answer for this one.

I'll try downloading others later. -J-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look Huang, as well as Jane, I also think #18 is Vengerov. In my opinion Maxim Vengerov is truly passionate, and doesn't have the mannerism of Kreisler, who although being one of the great players in history, at times was in the border of taste.

-sm

quote:

Originally posted by LongHair:

Vengerov? Passionate? Together in the same sentence?

Yes, I've heard him attempt Mendelssohn and I've Heard Kreisler play Mendelssohn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the topic of Vengerov, Kreisler, and Mendelssohn:

I think there are many different types of fire and passion. The young Heifetz, for instance, had plenty of fire -- but it was a totally different type of fire from the affection/passion that you hear in the playing of Kreisler, Elman, and others of that ilk.

Another good example: Oistrakh and Kogan. Both players with a great deal of fire -- but of utterly different types.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ten days are up on clips #9 - #12! I would have thought #9 and #10 would be dead-giveaways, but apparently not... Here are the answers:

#9 is a young Jascha Heifetz. I'm surprised by how few people got this one, given the blazing tempo (an almost insane tempo for Mozart), the virtuosity, and the characteristic Heifetz sound, which you can hear quite clearly in the slow sections.

#10 is Fritz Kreisler. I think this one was a bit tougher, but I didn't expect it to be difficult as it evidently was. Mozart's not exactly typically Kreisler in idiom, but the leisurely tempo is a beginning hint, and the slow sections contain very characteristic Kreisler gestures. His distinctive tone, too, is apparent throughout.

#11 is Sarah Chang. I find it ironic that this clip was recognized by the most number of people, given she is certainly a classic modern violinist. The cleanliness of her technique and sound on record is distinctive, here.

#12 is Alfred Campoli. It's likely that many of you have not heard his recordings before, which is probably what made this difficult. If you've heard Campoli before, though, then listen to the way he ends phrases here: the dramatic slowdown at the end of passages, the charm of the phrasings, in gestures that are characteristically Campoli. For those unfamiliar with him, he was known primarily as a player of light music post-War, though before that he had been a serious concert artist. He spent much of his life in England. The Strad did an article on him a few months ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Campoli! :-) That was fun

I haven't a clue on #14 & 15 - that could be because I don't listen to this piece much.

Okay, Hora Staccato: Not Heifetz on # 16

Someone recent...staccato separated, not one bow.

I'll Guess Dinicu for #15! Gypsy style, wow.

Then 17 & 18 I can't say for sure. Sorry Lydia, I listened twice, and really tried. I listened repeatedly, and all I can say is that I don't know. It's very difficult because there's a reverb or echo effect in the recordings, so it becomes hard to listen for the notes, to distinguish their quality. I know if echo studio sound was already on the recording, that sometimes this assists in clouding many factors. However, in consideration for a fairer test if reverb was added later through computer assistance in an effort to account for identifying the time period of the recording, associated clarity becomes muddled in the process. Anyway, overall I can say it wasn't whom I thought it was earlier when I listened, certain factors were missing regardless :-).

Again, this is a really a good site Lydia, and I have enjoyed it alot.

[This message has been edited by JKF (edited 03-18-2001).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Ole Bull:

OK, I can accept that #12 might not be Kreisler after all -- though I hear so much of his personality in it. And the trills...

So who is it then?

Someone who liked to dazzle, but a heartfelt performer nonetheless. Vasa Prihoda? When I find out, I want the album!

See lwl's post above for the answer to #12.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Ole Bull:

OK, I can accept that #12 might not be Kreisler after all -- though I hear so much of his personality in it. And the trills...

So who is it then?

Someone who liked to dazzle, but a heartfelt performer nonetheless. Vasa Prihoda? When I find out, I want the album!

Sorry-I guess I got my numbers in a twist - I meany #9. So, Heifetz, eh? I had ruled him out because I think of his performances as being a little colder... was this early Heifetz? What year.

Well, it shows how wrong I can be.

I think in general it's true that old-school violinists are more charismatic, explore a greater range of expressive devices etc., but hard to pick for most of us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm...

Now listened to the others a bit more and I am almost completely stumped but willing to hazard a guess based on (a)the apparent age of the recording (:) my limited knowledge of the list of violinists and © gut feeling of who I think should be in here and hasn't appeared so far wink.gif .

no 13 - as in my earlier post, this feels like Vadim Repin's vibrato (I'm seeing him tomorrow playing Brahms' double with Misha Maisky, maybe I'll ask him if he wants to have a go at this!)

no 14 - an older recording, absolute wild guess time now, could this be Julian Sitkovetsky, something about the rubato leads me to think it might be?

no 15 - Very old - I will go with previous posts that reckon this could be Dinicu himself, neat if it was, but no idea as I have never heard him play

no 16 - More modern and a nice gypsy feel to this. I like it, and for that reason and the fact he hasn't appeared yet and I can't believe he isn't here somewhere I'll say Perlman.

no 17 - Older recording. Something about this says Menuhin to me but I can't put my finger on what it is. It did the first time I heard it so I will stick with my first gut reaction.

no 18 - Like a breath of fresh air having listened to all the rest. I've said it before, this one has to be Maxim Vengerov. If it isn't tell me who it is and I am going to get tickets to his / her next concert, and buy all his/ her CDs . This is absolutely wonderful, and I love it.

I believe it is Vengerov because of the sforzando at the end of each passage, and especially that last note. This is typical of his style and I think it makes everyone else sounds like a wet fish ( although I know it may not be everybody's taste). This has spirit!!!

Here ends the voting of the Chesterfield jury!

Jane

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry for posting again here but I just want to thank Lydia for this. It has been so much fun, and who cares if you are right or wrong!!

It has given me the opportunity to listen to some people I have never heard before (Campoli, Hassid etc) compare styles etc with the aid of Lydia's wonderful notes when she posts the answers, and hear some virtuoso pieces I hadn't heard before.

Also to listen and think "do I like this", and "which one do I like more and why" before knowing who it is. Great stuff!

I have spent too much time doing this tonight, but I have enjoyed both listening to the ones we don't have answers to yet, and listening to the ones we do have answers to and listening for their distinctive playing features. What an education.

Thank you so much.

Jane

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lydia already gave away #9 when she gave me the hint that it's not Kreisler (Before I was thinking about either one of them: Kreisler, Heifetz, Milstein - but it doesn't sound even remotely like Milstein, though he did occasionally take dazzling tempo), but I was surprised that #10 is! I actually don't like #10 too much, and I guess this is the first time I hear something of Kreisler that I am not immediately impressed with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, now working my way through the ones that we haven't been given answers to yet. I've now found how to get them on my hard drive so I can listen over again while I do some work, rather than only while I'm on the internet smile.gif .

Wild guess on no 13 - This sounds like Vadim Repin's "butterfly" vibrato to me.

(Please bear in mind that not all the violinists on the list have I had the privilege of hearing (yet)

Jane

Link to comment
Share on other sites

#19 and #20 are 2 of these 3 people, I think: Issac Stern, Perlman or Kremer. I don't hear anything too characteristic of Perlman or Kremer with the recording quality (though I know P and K have very different vibrato, but that'd also depend on the what period of their career we're talking about), so I'll guess at least one is Issac Stern, and I'll say it's #19 for now. I might change my mind when I listen more.

#21 The warmth sounds like Menhuin. I am confident that I'm at least on the right track.

#22 Sounds unfamiliar - Nigel Kennedy? Those clean slow slides might be a clue for those who know what it means.

#23 Heifetzian intensity! Who else can play like that? (Menuhin can sometimes reach that level)

#24 No clue. Has a tiny bit of early Milstein quality, but sounds like a modern person.

[This message has been edited by stewarts (edited 03-20-2001).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lydia,

Did something happen to your page? I can only bring up a blank screen (was going to listen to the next batch). Anyway, have some problems to fix on my computer - space demands seem to have dumped some Real audio player components. -J-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're getting a blank page when you try to hit the page in the first place, right, not when you actually try to download a clip?

You must be using an ancient browser. I've added a bit of HTML to cope with ancient browsers; please try again. (Have you updated your browser in the last five years?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lwl - This is so great! You are so kind to set this up for us!

OK - Here I am going out on a limb -

#23 is NOT Heifetz or Perlman - I think it is someone more recent, maybe Gil Shaham or Midori? There is nice nuance, but things don't seem tossed off in that Heifetz-effortless way, and the tempo seems too slow for Heifetz.

#24 - might be Heifetz - but it doesn't have some of the characteristic Heifetz idiosyncronicities, like his grittiness and variety of tone, but the tempo, vibrato and freedom are somewhat Heifetzian. Might be Heifetz. I don't think this one is Perlman either.

lwl - Thank you again for this, and for your posts in general which are (uncommonly it seems) mature, well thought out and informed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...