Sign in to follow this  
Stephen  Fine

What instrument is everyone playing?

Recommended Posts

I just bought a new Gliga cello- it's fantastic. The tone is dark and mellow, and the craftsmanship is superb.

The only problem I had with it is the setup- cheap pegs, bad strings, etc. The guy who sold it (he commissions them personally from Gliga) told me it's hard to get accessories in Romania, so Gliga is forced to use this cheap stuff.

Kinda like driving a Corvette with plastic hubcaps- once you get the cheap accessories changed, though, the tone is unbeatable at this price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm playing periodically on a borrowed 1800 Joannes Gagliano.

Right now, it's sounding/feeling better than my Hartrain because my Hartrain needs its neck reset.

This Gagliano has this warm clear sound that allows me to get a Carole King-like murmur. It has this interesting way of singing without forcing that no modern violin I've played is capable of.

The master restorer I work with (who is also the owner of this violin) spent hours and hours repairing this instrument and tweaking the sound so that we could hear its voice clearly. It currently plays much better than anything I've tried, including the Strads and Guarneris I've played.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HKV, it looks as though it will be yours after all. I'm rootin' for ya!

I play an old instrument without a label or any provenance. However, it has exquisite purfling that scrolls about the corners into trefoil patterns and does loop similarly around the back. In the center of the back set in the center of a scrolling medallion is the word "CANORA." Across the top and the bottom of the back, in Latin, are words which roughly translate to "In the woods I lived in silence, in death I sing."

My luthier thinks that it might be English made in an Italian pattern. It has a fine, but crackled finish in a very deep red-brown color. It is almost featherweight, but projects a strong, even tone from the g string all the way up. I played it with Olivs for a couple of years, but Florida weather finally got the best of me, so I traded the g-d-a for Dominants but kept the Oliv e.

[This message has been edited by Brad Stevens (edited 03-16-2000).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I play Gliga violin made in 1996. I have read many posts saying that their Gliga instruments (whether, violin, viola, cello...) had bad setups and so on. However, everyone who has bought an Gliga instrument are made in 1998, 99.

Actually, my violin came with a very good setup. It was one of the things I liked about it. A nice bridge, very nice pegs. Even my teacher asked if I got the pegs seperate when purchasing the violin. I told him no, and he seemed impressed. The pegs tune with great ease. The violin came with Dominants, however I use the Pirastro Olive strings.

I really LOVE my violin a lot! the sound is very mellow, and has a nice volume. The G string is very nice, as well as the D. On many of the violins I tried, if the G sounded good, the E wasn't very strong, however, I find my E string quite powerful. A classmate (who plays a cheap student copy of a strad), even asked "Why does your E string sound so loud?! I hardly have to pull the bow, and the E string comes out so loud!" I have heard many stories (good and bad) on Gligas, however they were all made in 1998 or 99.

I was wondering if someone else has a Gliga made in 1996 or earlier. I would like to hear any comments about them, if anyone owns one. It seems that the later models lacked a lot of the characteristics that my violin has. Is it that now, they are becoming more popular, they don't have the capabilities to make a nice setup (due to the high demand of their instruments)? By the way, my violin was made by Gliga Vasile himself.

Any replies are welcomed smile.gif

Diana cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I play on a fiddle that was my great-great grandfathers. The label was stolen when my dad sent it to Kansas City for repairs when he played in high school. One expert dated it in the mid to late 1800's. It has alot of soul.

I have another fiddle made or repaired by " Frank Sterbach "

violin maker and repairer

1955 Phil. Pa.

Has anyone ever heard of Frank Sterbach? It is a nice sounding fiddle but I love my grandfathers to much to play it that much. I also play a Martin D-28.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin D-28, huh? Wonderful guitar! Is it new or is it from the 50s-60s?

I play a Gibson Custom Shop Tal Farlow jazz archtop through a Polytone Mini-Brute amp. I also have a Fender Ampcan that sounds better than any little battery-powered amp should. I also have a terrific sounding Series 10 copy of an Epiphone Les Paul that I use outdoors and in questionable playing situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I play a 1999 Ivan Dunov, Bulgarian Violin, which I purchased before I started back to lessons (after many many years of not touching the violin) so far so good I love it. I can't remember what violin I had when I was growing up, all I know is that it wouldn't keep in tune. I did bring the old violin to a shop by me and he fixed a seam that needed to be glued, put a new bridge on and changed the strings to dominant, I paid about $100.00 to clean it up. It did turn out to be an ok violin but I decided to sent it up to my brother to fiddle around with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HKV,

it is a 74 model D-28 in mint condition, I should feel bad, but when we have a jam session I'm reluctant to let just anyone play it for fear of getting it dinged up. It has wonderfull sound, it has soul as well.

Every time I visit with my fiddle mentor he wants to buy it.

Thanks for asking

lineman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frown.gif I read of all these beautiful old instruments and feel ashamed of my 15 jear old violin. I got it when I became old enough for a 4/4 . It´s made by Uphoff, a german Violin-builder in Mannheim. It´s cheap. But thats the reason, why I can take it with me everywhere I go smile.gif, so I can play on it whenever I like to. Sometimes when I sit on my car in the evening on the top of a hill or when I walk around in one of the old castles that are all around here (Germany! I don´t live in Dooney as one might think, but "the fiddler of dooney" is a lovely poem laugh.gif). The only thing worth to mention about my violin is that it´s signed by Nigel Kennedy and other persons that are not famous for beeing great violin-players. If I had a expensive old violine I would not allow anyone to write on it, so I have fun tongue.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this will make me too popular, but I play a Zeta Educator electric violin through a Zoom 505 guitar-effects processor, sometimes with a Morley Pro wah-wah pedal. My main amp is a 1965 Ampeg Gemini 6 (tube), a great big box with a pitiful 30 watts of power.

If I don't like the tone, I just change it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just acquire this new baby last month:

No label inside.. frown.gif , about 200 yrs old.

On the top of the back (closed to the neck) was envraved

"Mittenwald"

" A K "

Once piece back.

My previous lover was a Strad copy made in Germany, about 50 years old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a $1500 Stainer copy, from the 1800's. It's got a carved lion's head with inlaid pearl eyes for the scroll. There is also this very beautiful roping around both sides of the violin, which is inlaid bits of light and dark wood. Forms a design like a rope all around the edges of the front and back. It is extremely high-arching and easier for me to play, like HKV, because I have small hands. I didn't know much about violin tone when I bought it and did so solely on looks. And now, even after learning to tell some things about a violins tone, I am very happy with that aspect of it also. Although I think I'm going to splurge the $$ and try Obligatos that are so popular. I can't wait to hear it with better strings.

I also have a Yamaha silent electric violin that I love to take camping. I can live in a fantasy world when I play it and in my head, I'm in Carnegie Hall. (It'll never happen otherwise!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a French violin by Vincent Lanne, 1998 (really new!) Anyone heard of him? Wonder how it got into my hands in the first place. Very clear, fine tone, rings instead of blurting out. but unfortunately the G string is slightly slow and sounds a bit rough ("buzzy")compared to the other strings which are great. From my perspective it could use a bit more strength in fff notes - but apparently it projects well enough to be distictively heard when I'm in orchestra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Violin: ‘School of Neuner u. Hornsteiner’ (with Matthias Hornsteiner label), 1865. Coarse belly wood, back mottled like a tortoiseshell cat; varnish not as dark as a Hornsteiner of this period ought to be (I must admit to having meddled here, because it looked as if somebody had painted it with an old hairbrush dipped in creosote).

Viola: Bechstein-Moor 1930. – No, I have not typed ‘viola’ by mistake for ‘piano’; it really was made in Bechstein's Berlin piano factory to the design of Emanuel Moor (1865-1931), Hungarian composer and inventor of the Moor duplex piano. It has an unusual table - perfectly straight from top to bottom but very steeply arched across its width and with a V-shaped central valley or groove down its full length - and two extra internal bars. Nobody seems to know anything about it; Moor, who was a respected composer in his day (admired by Casals among others) is apparently so completely forgotten that even a specialised database of Hungarian composers does not include him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A no-name one. When I wanted it, I insisted that they get the neck modernized, as It was an ancient neck. Then it sounded very piercing and quite loud. Brilliant and a bit sweet.

Now it sounds a bit quieteer and sweeter. The volume is still OK, but it lacks even a touch of robustness and mellowness, so somthing like Bachs concerto in E doesn't come out the best. That concerto e.g. needs sweetness, but needs to be contained also-more desperately than most of Mozart or (perhaps) Beethovens music.

But within what it has, I can get many shades easily. It is very responsive throught the fingerboard.

An old proffesional violinist in England liked it alot

(before it was repaired) and he was origionally meaned to be repairing it but it went wrong. Anyway he said I would never want another violin. I paid-with the repair

(which was done well by a Hill"s workman)

450 pounds sterling = about $750.

Maybe it was a mistake for me to put quieter (i.e. thicker) strings on the G and D, as they seemed to be louder, so I wanted to ballance it. Maybe someone can tell me if this was my mistake?

The violin is slightly thin/small built and the wood seems to be wonderfull. I am told it is from Mittenwald. The grain is fine and straight in the front piece, which I think would be suitable for very valuable instruments also.

If I pick it up by the scroll, unnaturally, it goes out of tune. I hope that's not very serious. And the tuning is very unstable and difficult to do.

I wish I could get other expert opinions, than what I have so far.

S.Taylor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Viola: 1965 Theo Glaesel, Marneukirchen Germany. Quite and enigma - should be s student quality instrument, but I could no find a better modern instrument- in fact only ever played one that I prefered - a Gaspar, and it didn't sound better, but was much easier to play. Bow - a 1981 Frank V. Henderson that I commissioned.

Violin: An old no name with a sweet, dark, small tone is my second instrument. My primary is a 1981 Walt Senkow (Dallas), psuedo-Guarneri del Jesu copy. Responsive, projects well, and extremely even in sound all the way up and down the register.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.