Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Good CD's to have


funny_mom
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here's a list someone recently gave me from, I think, from a Martha Stewart team. (I was going to post this on a separate thread just to see what you all thought of the list, but FunnyMom's question seems as good a spot as any.)

Gil Shaham's "The Four Seasons" on Deutsche Grammophon;

Perlman's and Stern's "Bach: Double Concerto" on Sony Classical*;

Perlman's "Greatest Hits" on Deutsche Grammophon;

Hilary Hahn's Barber and Meyer concertos on Sony Classical;

Milstein's Bach sonatas and partitas on Deutsche Grammophon;

Joshua Bell's "The Kreisler Album"*;

Mutter's (at 15 years of age) Mozart concertos (3 and 5) on Deutsche Grammophon;

Perlman's "Great Romantic Concertos" (3-CD set) on EMI;

Heifetz's Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky violin concertos on RCA.

The only ones I own are the two starred ones (*) and both are fine, particularly Bell on Kreisler--very, very fine.

Just thought you all might like to see what the Martha Stewart specialists think is the best of the best to recommend to the mainstream as a starting place. I was very happy, of course, to see Milstein there, even though I don't have that particular recording and will certainly look for it.

Best regards,

Theresa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Theresa,

Thank you very much. I have the Joshua Bell Kreisler Album and we like it very much. I was wondering about the Gil Shaham Four Seasons. It has very good reviews at Amazon. By the way, do you mean this list was from the Martha Stewart Magazine? Did they say on what basis they chose this list? Thanks again. I will be doing some shopping soon.

funny_mom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funny mom, so good to see you posting every now and then.

Do you make CDs or tapes of the music your son plays in his orchestra? I made a CD of all of the pieces that my son's orchestra is playing. If I don't have a particular piece of music, I find it. I had to recently order the Boyce Symphonies because they are playing the first movement of Boyce's 4th Symphony.

I find that my son enjoys listening to the CDs I make. I also tend to play them over and over again so that he gets more familiar with them since some of the music is new to him.

In addtion to buying the CDs that were recommended to you (and there are some wonderful ones listed), buying the music in his current orchestra repertoire is a great thing to do.

Have fun browsing. There isn't anything I like better than browsing through the classical section of a large music store.

Renee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Renee,

We posted at almost the same time! It is nice to see you posts too. I have finally settled into our new routine for the school year and so I have more time to post messages and browse the net. Yes, the conductor has suggested us getting music that the orchestra is playing and I have finally gotten around to it.

By the way, how do you make CD's? Do you have a CD burner? I only get to copy the songs from the CD onto a tape and we listen to it in the car or at home. But tapes are not as convenient since I can't skip straight to a song. Anyway, it really helps to listen to the orchestra music on tape or CD.

How is your son enjoying orchestra? Are the pieces hard? My son just got a really hard piece this week, but he loves it. I hope he can manage. I am worried about bad habits, such as tightening the bow hand/arm when he plays pieces that are too fast for him. We'll see. Sorry about going off on a tangent!

funny_mom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funny mom, I actually have 2 CD burners, one for my computer and one attached to my stereo. I have an extensive record (LP) collection that I have been making CDs of. I find that it is a great thing to have to compile different music on Cds when I don't want just a copy of the whole CD ( as in making the CDs for my son).

As for my son's orchestra music, his viola parts don't seem to be very difficult. That doesn't appear so with the first violin parts. I am not sure if your son is first or second violin. However, we will see on Thursday when he has to audition for his seat with the music for the first performance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

PLEASE PLEASE... do NOT buy Mutter's Mozart. This could cause bodily harm. I listened to her play it enough times so that I could realize it wasn't a comedy act, then I haven't listened to it since. If you're going to buy Mozart, buy Grumiaux on Philips Label. Everything else on Theresa's list is excellent. Just keep in mind:

Bach: Milstein

Mozart: Grumiaux

Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Beethoven: Heifetz or Perlman or even Grumiaux

Chamber Music: Stern

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everything by Heifetz (but only get baroque and classical if you decide you REALLY like Heifetz)

So, in other words, get the Beethoven, Mendelssohn, and Tchaikovsky Concertos. If you find that you like Heifetz, try his Bach Concertos. Oh, and regardless, get his Bach Sonatas and Partitas (but only if you really like Bach; they can get really annoying to some people).

Bach's 2 Violin Concertos and Double Violin Concerto by David Oistrakh (the Double along with his son, Igor).

And some stuff that doesn't pertain to solo violin:

All 9 Beethoven Symphonies, with the Berlin Philharmonic under Herbert von Karajan (the recordings from the early 60s).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like Shaham's "Four Seasons", though I'm sure there will be some who disagree. There's a nice little "Winter" video bonus on the disc, too.

I'm not familiar with the Perlman/Stern Bach Double.

I don't much care for "Greatest Hits" discs, usually. For Perlman, I'd rather recommend his "Bits and Pieces" to anyone looking for that kind of thing. Better yet, get Milstein's "Encores" CD.

Hahn's Barber/Meyer CD is wonderful and a must-hear.

Milstein's Bach set on DG is my personal preference, but his EMI recording is also very good.

I think that if you're only going to own a single Kreisler album, EMI's "Kreisler Plays Kreisler" should be it.

I can't recommend Mutter's Mozart, even the slightest bit. Get Grumiaux's set instead; it's cheap (Philips 2-for-1) and outstanding.

Perlman's "Great Romantic Concertos" set is fairly good, though not as good as a now out-of-print EMI 3-CD set of his. I'd recommend buying the single discs instead: Mendelssohn/Bruch (the early, 1970s recording) is a good place to start.

The Heifetz Mendelssohn/Tchaikovsky on RCA suffers from overly fast tempi. It's certainly characteristically Heifetz, but probably not the best sampling one could get. I'd recommend his "Showpieces" recording instead, or better yet, his EMI mono recording of the Sibelius and Glazunov.

[This message has been edited by Lydia Leong (edited 10-31-2000).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by funny_mom:

I was wondering about the Gil Shaham Four Seasons.

It's superb (thanks to Orpheus as well as to Shaham). I am so sick of the Seasons that I thought I couldn't bear to hear them again, but when my wife brought this CD home from his recent performance in our area (which I couldn't attend) I enjoyed it thoroughly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Jascha:

All 9 Beethoven Symphonies, with the Berlin Philharmonic under Herbert von Karajan (the recordings from the early 60s).
[/b]

Thanx! This is exactly what I have been pondering. I hear about all of the "superstars", but I am honestly more interested in learning about the many orchestras. Whenever I look for a specific work or a favorite composer, I usually just buy the one with "London" somewhere on the print because I don't know anything. Maybe I'll just make a personal mission to find every recording of "the nutcracker" this season and compare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by funny_mom:

What about Perlman's Encore and Perlman's A La Carte?

"A La Carte" is terrific, especially since the accompaniment is orchestra, not piano, as it typically is with most of the works that Perlman plays on it. (Among them is one of my favorite short works, Sarasate's Introduction and Tarantella, which is, I think, much-enhanced by orchestra rather than piano, especially the use of percussion.)

"Encores" is typical first-rate Perlman playing, though much of what is on the CD has been done better by other players, in my opinion. It's not good enough to make my list of things that everyone ought to have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FunnyMom: About the list. Someone ripped this list out of a magazine and told me it was the Martha Stewart magazine. But I don't see anything on the pages that indicates this--so I'm assuming the person was correct. There's an articile on the violin that accompanies the list. And the graphics look delicately chosen as you'd expect with Stewart--that kind of butter mint, gentle, tasteful look. My own house is so "out there" disorganized nothing matches what IS this room supposed to be these things are upside down that these magazine pages are the only visually tasteful objects in sight.

I, too, am sick of "The Four Seasons"--I was sick of 'em in college back three decades ago--so, if Gil Shaham's could move me, then they must be masterful. I haven't heard 'em, though--but will, just to see.

Intering comments from Lymond and Lydia on the Mozart--might buy those just to hear what they consider to be truly bad.

Best regards,

Theresa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hilary Hahn's Bach album is a must. One would rarely encouter such a combination of intellect and supreme violinistic control.

I second HKV about Kreisler. However, Kreisler's accoustic recordings dates from 1906-25, not 45. I think he just made a typo there. Some of later (1936-45) recordings of Kreisler are not as good violinistically, but he still was Kreisler.

Another fine recordings that nobody should be miss are piano trio recordings made by Alfred Cortot, Jacques Thibaud and Pablo Casals. I have never heard anyone play with such a incredible "ensemble" rubato, not even from Heifetz/Piatigorsky ensemble. Their recordings are sheer magic.

Another "no" on Mutter's Mozart. I may be biased (I generally don't care for Mutter's playing), but I felt the performance was a bit heavy-handed. Grumiaux, Szeryng and Schneiderhan made much more convincing versions. If you want a "romantic" Mozart, Ferras, Francescatti, Thibaud or even Kreisler made more convincing recordings.

As for Bach Double, Stern/Perlman is too lush for me. I prefer Szeryng/Hasson or Grumiaux/Krebbers (both should be on Philips label). If you don't mind an old recording, Menuhin/Enescu is deeply felt and heart-warming performance.

Finally the Beethoven symphonies. I don't like Karajan's recordings at all. It is beautifully played, but I find them superficial. I would recommend George Szell with Cleveland Orchestra. You will not only get superb performances, but can save some money as well (it is on Sony's budget label). Once you get familiar with the works, try perhaps Toscanini, Monteux, Furtwangler and Carlos Kleiber (Kleiber only recorded a few of them, but they are truly marvellous).

Toscha

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't like Hahn's Bach album - too many rhythmic liberties, too little Baroque dance pulse, too much musculature.

For the Bach Double, I listen to baroque violinists. Though they're shockingly similar ("modern baroque violinists"), one's perception of baroque music does change slightly after listening to the period setup.

I recommend two recordings of the Beethoven Symphonies

1) Sergiu Celibidache. He's the only one that actually pays attention to the score - thus resulting in "unorthodox" interpretations that I feel are closer to the original Beethoven intent than . . .

2) Roger Norrington and the London Classical Players heavily edited complete Beethoven set. These are done on period instruments, resulting in a presentation far different from our "modern" views of what Beethoven is. Nevertheless, the personality of Norrington's Beethoven is lost in the wash of sound and splices - unlike the Celi recordings which were all taken from LIVE concerts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toscha, I agree with you about Karajan's Beethoven in one example - the 9th. I find that the accented notes are far too potent than they need to be, and greatly interfere with the flowing quality of the piece. The timpani is quite a bit too loud as well. I am speaking of the first movement; it is OK for the timpani to be loud in the second movement wink.gif.

Anyway, I don't like it nearly as much as Bernstein's recording from 1969. (So, River, you might want to pick up the 9th by someone other than Karajan.) I've never heard any of Szell but the 8th, but I liked it; I'll have to hear the rest of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do love Hilary Hahn's solo Bach album, but I believe that both of Milstein's recordings are superior to it. Still, if you want a modern digital recording, I'd recommend it highly.

I have both the 1960s and 1970s Karajan Beethoven symphony sets. I would recommend the one from the 60s. However, I think that unless you really want these as a set, you are probably better off buying a best-in-category.

For an inexpensive full set of symphonies by an arbitrary composer, I have to recommend Jochum's Bruckner symphony set, which is glorious, or Solti's Mahler cycle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the rhythmic stability is the issue in Bach, get Heifetz. His slow movements of G and A minor sonatas are rock-steady (in one of his masterclass video, I think I recall seeing Heifetz tapping the pulse with pencil while his student was playing). He does not mess around with rubato (interestingly enough, both Szeryng and Milstein take far greater rhythmic freedom in those movements than Heifetz. Rather interesting, isn't it?).

I was never taken by period instrument players, regardless of repertoire. Besides the ones I mentioned above, I like Busch/Magnes, Milstein/Morini and Menuhin/Ferras quite well for Bach Double. It is a pity that Thibaud did not record it with Enescu or Flesch. Judging from the way he played the Bach E major, he would have been wonderful in the Double concerto.

By the way, how about some chamber music? Budapest, Amadeus (although I don't particularly like them) and Vegh made excellent set of Beethoven quartets. The Borodin Quartet's recordings of the Russian quartets (Tchaikovsky, Borodin etc.) are very beautiful as well.

Another recording of Szell that I strong recommend. His Schumann symphonies are incredible. He knew exactly how to deal with Schumann's dense (and at times, muddy) orchestration. In his hand, the texture becomes beautifully transparent and all the important lines come out with clarity second to none (I have played all but the first symphony and have witnessed conductors struggling to balance orchestras).

Lastly, Grumiaux's 2 CD set of encore pieces are heartwarming. He plays with same love and sensitivity he would insert in masterpieces. For anyone who loves "non-aggressive" violin playing, this is a must.

Toscha

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is always good to be exposed to the best artists and composers, and not just the best violinists. A few random favorites:

Conductors:

Toscanini-- Rigoletto Act IV, and the NY Phil recordings (esp. Verdi and Wagner preludes, and Brahms. The Mozart I don't like and the Beethoven is overrated.) Try also the Schubert 9th with the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Carlos Kleiber-- Many of the complete operas are interesting, but start with the New Year 1989 disc from Vienna.

Mengelberg-- Ein Heldenleben with the NYPO, and if you have a taste for the wild side, his Tchaikovsky recordings from the 20s with the Concertgebouw

Celibidache-- Bruckner 4th is a gem in that set.

Walter-- Brahms 3 and 4. Or try Koussevitzky for Brahms 3. Nobody else gets the propulsive, Schumannesque quality of the first movement right.

Britten-- Mozart #25 and especially #29. So sensual and alive.

Shilkret-- conducted the first "American in Paris" recording, purportedly with the blessing of the composer. I love it.

Pianists:

Lipatti-- desert island-quality Chopin, esp. the waltzes and the Barcarolle. A nice Bach Partita also.

Glenn Gould-- tread carefully, but there is much though-provoking Bach. 3 great (and completely different) versions of the Goldberg Variations.

Lhevinne-- complete recordings, out on Philips again (2 discs).

Curzon-- no special favorite. Maybe the Emperor Concerto? Or Brahms 1st?

Singers:

Wunderlich-- Mozart or Italian opera (in German). Fine Schubert lieder also.

Pavarotti-- some of the earlier recordings. Fille du Regiment, La Boheme. The "O Holy Night" disc could have been a cheesy commercial affair, but shows his talent wonderfully, just as Kreisler's forays into the least exalted repertoire sometimes made for his most personal souvenirs.

And speaking of cheesy commercial discs for the upcoming season, Heifetz made a brilliant recording of "White Christmas" back in the 40s for American Decca.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Lydia Leong:

I'd recommend his recording of the Grieg concerto.

Haven't heard that one, but it was a favorite of Kirsten Flagstad's. I love most of his work anyway-- so wise and humane. He also did some lovely Mozart concertos with Britten and the ECO that I have never seen reissued. I only have a cassette (yuck!).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...