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HuangKaiVun

If you could study with anyone, who would you study with?

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i didn't read all the replys but i guess someone will still choose their current teacher. even if there isn't anyone, then i'll throw the first vote.

cos it seems to me that without my present teacher, i'll be nothing.

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-Deleted message- :-) Admin - you better do something about this or you'll get a whole lot of messages edited to delete!!!

[This message has been edited by JKF (edited 10-13-2000).]

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Addition to my previous set of teachers, I would love to study Mozart and French music with Jacques Thibaud. He seemed to be a wonderfully warm and witty character as well.

Toscha

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I didn't ask Rosand to join the board. He didn't seem like an Internet user to me.

Edgar Meyer - I love that guy's playing. For a while, I modeled my violin playing after his string-friendly style. To me, THAT's what a string instrument is supposed to sound like.

I think that if I could pick a person to do a duet with, it would be Edgar Meyer.

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It is hard to say to which teacher somebody will fit personally.

But I think Auer must have been great.He must have inspired very much his students.

And he must have had a very good intuition.

People like Flesh , Galamian and Gingold must have been also great. Enesco was surely also a wonderful teacher in music in general

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You hit, intentionally or not, on the core of the issue for me. Once I was asked what violin maker I would have chosen to work with, and I unhesitatingly chose Nicolo Amati. Others chose makers like Stradivari and Guarneri del Gesu, but to me that was missing the point. Stradivari and del Gesu didn't teach anyone successfully, so why would I want to learn from them, whereas Nicolo Amati taught his students so well that many of them ultimately became great. I'd pick the teacher with successful students anytime over learning from a successful performer who hasn't nutrured a single successful student.

quote:

Originally posted by Ilinpelin:

It is hard to say to which teacher somebody will fit personally.

But I think Auer must have been great.He must have inspired very much his students.

And he must have had a very good intuition.

People like Flesh , Galamian and Gingold must have been also great. Enesco was surely also a wonderful teacher in music in general

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Carl Flesch. He had a knack for -- and an apparently genuine enjoyment of -- taking mediocre players and turning them into fairly good ones. Seems right up my alley. smile.gif

I have to say that I really miss a former teacher of mine, though.

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I'd study with Perlman, DeLay, and O'Connor--if I had infinite funds, no teaching obligations, nothing else going on in my life--and if they had infinite patience and somehow had lost their minds in agreeing to teach me.

T.

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As others have suggested, for me it would have been Beethoven, because he would have been able to teach me how to play his music they way it would have been intended (piano and all else for that matter). Technically, for cello, and only if I had the ability and physical capability, Piatigorsky.

One of my daughters (violin) is already studying with the person whom she always dreamed of being with. There is no greater person today, than he is for us. And I suppose that's how it should be, to learn from those we highly admire, respect, and hold in greatest esteem.

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As others have suggested, for me it would have been Beethoven, because he would have been able to teach me how to play his music the way it would have been intended (piano and all else for that matter). Technically, for cello, and only if I had the ability and physical capability, Piatigorsky.

One of my daughters (violin) is already studying with the person whom she always dreamed of being with. There is no greater person today, than he is for us. And I suppose that's how it should be, to learn from those we highly admire, respect, and hold in greatest esteem.

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Leopold Auer!

I wonder why he's only mentioned once in this thread. I mean who had more great students then he did? From Jascha to Toscha, from Zimbalist to Shumsky, his students were just fantastic (even if you don't count Milstein). His indirect students such as Julian Sitkovetsky, who studied with Yampolsky, were just as legendary too.

Carl Flesch pretty much only had Haendel and Szynerg; Galamian and Delay together produce those who many condemn as the "modern school"; Rosand has yet to produce any super-stars. Gingold has Laredo, Bell, and Cerovsek as the more famous ones, but they haven't to rise to a lengendary status yet. Louis Persinger might be a good choice too, but I really can't see what Menuhin and Ricci had in common. So I'll definitely go for Auer no matter how stingy he is!

[This message has been edited by stewarts (edited 10-15-2000).]

[This message has been edited by stewarts (edited 10-20-2000).]

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Yeah, Auer was obviously a great teacher and player - a professional cello soloist friend of mine told me that his playing was fantastic on 78.

I also wonder how good his assistant(s) were.

Often, an assistant has as least as much impact on a student's development as the main professor does.

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HKV makes an important point. My own fiddle teacher studied with Oistrakh. He says that Oistrakh paid no attention to technical matters, only musical ones. Keeping the members of the class up to the technical mark was the job of Oistrakh's assistants--none of whom was a famous performer or revered teacher.

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