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Sharpening tiny round chisel


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I've used hard felt wheels to sharpen/remove burrs chisels and gouges before. A couple of seconds after honing will produce a very nice edge. But the downside is a bit scary.

 

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36 minutes ago, Dennis J said:

To Fiddlemaker, I use my "bridge" honing guide to sharpen plane irons. Just a length of wood with a roundhead bolt at the end which can be screwed in or out for minor adjustments to the honing angle. I use it with the steel plates charged with diamond paste with kerosene as a lubricant. All you need is a flat surface. Honing guides with rollers instead of a bolt like mine were made in the past.

 

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Thank you. I had seen this before (it was probably yours) but I had forgotten. I like this idea. I use the jig with a wheel, and the wheel gets covered with swarf rolling on the stone. 

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9 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Why is it not as viable for grinding, as it is for final honing?
While I don't use exactly the pivot pin method for grinding gouges, I use something very similar, and it seems to have served me well for many decades, crude as it is, made from parts I had around at the moment, including a cello endpin, an electric motor and gears from a retired milk dispensing machine, and a piece of discarded Formica-topped kitchen counter.

grinder reduced.jpg

It's an inspirational homage to Heath-Robinson. 

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1 hour ago, FiddleMkr said:

Thank you. I had seen this before (it was probably yours) but I had forgotten. I like this idea. I use the jig with a wheel, and the wheel gets covered with swarf rolling on the stone. 

It's neater to have a suitable piece of flat hardwood inline with the stone for the wheel to roll on. You can shim it up or down to quickly adjust the angle. 

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Just now, LCF said:

It's neater to have a suitable piece of flat hardwood inline with the stone for the wheel to roll on. You can shim it up or down to quickly adjust the angle. 

If we're talking about the same device ie a 'honing guide'

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10 hours ago, LCF said:

It's neater to have a suitable piece of flat hardwood inline with the stone for the wheel to roll on. You can shim it up or down to quickly adjust the angle. 

We are talking about the same thing. I haven’t tried the hardwood to roll the jig on, but doesn’t it limit the amount of the stone that you can use? At least the jig that I have has the wheel close to the plane iron edge in order to use a lot of the stone. I can imagine a longer jig that would work well rolling on hardwood. 
https://levoite.com/collections/newest-design/products/levoite™-honing-guide-sled-chisel-sharpening-jig?gad_source=4&gclid=Cj0KCQjwxeyxBhC7ARIsAC7dS3-I559cuEToHrxKaX8ajUDOKNRwU3rB6NNROJVVOBTp0MThm-ERKZwaAkmREALw_wcB

this is not what I was thinking of, but it is the same idea.

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17 minutes ago, FiddleMkr said:

We are talking about the same thing. I haven’t tried the hardwood to roll the jig on, but doesn’t it limit the amount of the stone that you can use? At least the jig that I have has the wheel close to the plane iron edge in order to use a lot of the stone. I can imagine a longer jig that would work well rolling on hardwood. 
https://levoite.com/collections/newest-design/products/levoite™-honing-guide-sled-chisel-sharpening-jig?gad_source=4&gclid=Cj0KCQjwxeyxBhC7ARIsAC7dS3-I559cuEToHrxKaX8ajUDOKNRwU3rB6NNROJVVOBTp0MThm-ERKZwaAkmREALw_wcB

this is not what I was thinking of, but it is the same idea.

That's only a couple of short steps away from a fully automated cnc sharpening shuttle!

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 5/4/2024 at 10:44 PM, MikeC said:

 

I like that!  I'm going to make one.  

I’m using the sharpening jig again and I thought it may be good to mention something, in case you haven’t thought of it yourself. I put 2 angles on the backside of the gouge; say 20 degrees and 30. Then I have a fulcrum, or a pivot, for control of the depth of cut. The gouge I’m sharpening now has the pivot at about 3/16” back from the edge. 
         It is of course easy to change the sharpening angle by raising or lowering the jig relative to the sharpening plate. 
 

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8 hours ago, MikeC said:

I don't usually have a secondary bevel but might try it sometime.  

The problem that I ran into without a “secondary bevel” was that the gouge keeps going deeper. That is when the back of the gouge is completely flat (from the edge back). 
      And if it is rounded the gouge wanted to climb out of the wood (almost immediately). 
       So the solution (for me at least) was to put two flats on the back of the gouge. Then I had a pivot point and could control the depth of cut. 

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Sharpening a gouge without without a continuous, slightly domed bevel reduces its efficiency. That rounding can be achieved by aiming for a low-angle, wide bevel. That can be started with a slight hollow grind stopping well back from the cutting edge. Metal can then be removed from the heel of the bevel followed by the area near the edge. Removing enough metal from the heel and near the cutting edge will eventually result in a smooth, slightly rounded bevel. it is important to not increase the sharpening angle adjacent to the cutting edge too sharply so it can take some time with a finer grade stone.

There should not be any secondary bevel just a continuous, low angle one. Being able to start the cut with the handle as low a possible is the most important factor.  

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How a gouge performs depends on how it is ground and sharpened. This gouge is ground at a slightly higher angle than most I have so I had to raise the handle a little higher to start the cut. It has no tendency to climb out of the cut. When I say domed or rounded I don't mean any excessive rounding just a slight curvature. If the gouge bevel is very rounded and steep it will tend to climb out of the cut, but I'm talking about a slightly curved single bevel. A smooth continuous bevel from the cutting edge to the heel.

DSC_0452.JPG

DSC_0453.JPG

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