Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Earliest date for throughneck violin method


Schnefsky

Recommended Posts

Hi, this throughneck that I acquired has a date of 1779 etched into a rib, and a repairers date of 1887 pencilled inside. I'm wondering if the 1779 date could be legit. Throughnecks appear to be common in the early 1800s. Does anyone know the earliest dating of this construction method? Thanks in advance. I can't seem to find this info online.

Added: London is stamped below the button, and maybe another word that is illegible.  Top plate is missing. Neck is shorter at 120 instead of 130. One piece back.

20231118_194521.jpg

20231118_194438.jpg

20231118_194332.jpg

20231118_194208.jpg

20231118_194634.jpg

20231118_194556.jpg

20231118_194546.jpg

20231118_194414.jpg

20231118_194408.jpg

20231118_194357.jpg

20231118_194313.jpg

20231118_194255.jpg

20231118_194208.jpg

Edited by Schnefsky
More pictures and info were requested by a member
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks! I would think an owner did the 1779 date, not the maker. But I would like to know, when was the first known throughneck made? Were they contemporaneous with Baroque or only much later? I've fixed up a few and most were quite nice tone and liked by old timey fiddlers. But, just how far back in history was the throughneck constructed?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Schnefsky said:

Thanks! I would think an owner did the 1779 date, not the maker. But I would like to know, when was the first known throughneck made? Were they contemporaneous with Baroque or only much later? I've fixed up a few and most were quite nice tone and liked by old timey fiddlers. But, just how far back in history was the throughneck constructed?

You're making an assumption that it's a date! There's nothing that would really indicate that it's a date (like saying anno). It could be a rental inventory number. It looks like more of the usual to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the additional pictures.

interesting violin, not the usual.

the head doesn’t look Saxon, and the lower block has an unusual shape.

the island for the trough neck is odd though as it reaches much further into the body than the neck. Maybe it was shortened.

the construction method can be found at old English instruments, too.

while the brand (xxxx London), may or may not be the maker, the violin could still be English.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Schnefsky said:

...just how far back in history was the throughneck constructed?

Through necks pre-date the violin.

According to Karl Roy's book:  The lira family of instruments, dating mainly 1450 to 1600, "are the predecessors of the violin family."  The lira de braccio had ribs "inserted into the neck."  Lirae de braccio are shown in artwork dating 1390 to 1534, and they were still in use after 1600.  (pages 83-86)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...