Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Good violin! Italian?


JH47

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Christian Pedersen said:

I do see a bit more recent polish than some dealers currently prefer but I'm not seeing a revarnish job.

I'm curious what makes you think that. 

--Chris 

The overall and uniform pale appearance-except at the scroll rear and windings-gives the impression that it was stripped. Not revarnished, what would mean a new colored varnish would have been added.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

Screwdriver antiquing involved using a tool, similar to a screwdriver, to scratch and dent the instrument, to give a false impression of age. The marks left were rubbed with a dirty pigment mix, to look like old damage.

Any luthiers use the ballpoint pen or pencil technique?  I found a bunch of looping indentations on the back of my violin where it appears a past owner may have been using it as a writing surface for jotting down notes on their sheet music…:angry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, outofnames said:

Any luthiers use the ballpoint pen or pencil technique?  I found a bunch of looping indentations on the back of my violin where it appears a past owner may have been using it as a writing surface for jotting down notes on their sheet music…:angry:

This is the first I've heard of it appearing on any other violin.  I have an old instrument from my grandfather, and it looks like someone was writing shorthand on the ribs, and here and there on the plates and scroll.  I should try to find out more about it when I have time

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Screwdriver antiquing is often overdone (while they are at it), and the nicks are somewhat similar to each other, even if they try to avoid it.

The marks here are few and far between and they appear very random, in depth, length, intensity, angle, etc. I’d lean towards thinking these marks are genuine signs of aging. If it was done artificially, then certainly not with the (proverbial) screwdriver.

Also, while I have seen instruments antiqued from new with a neck graft and bushed pegs holes; I have not seen multiple peg bushes applied to new instruments. Also, this was mostly done in the 1920s/30s and this instrument looks very different overall. Again, I think it is genuinely old.

Not sure about a revarnish at some point. I don’t see any conclusive indications for it myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

Screwdriver antiquing involved using a tool, similar to a screwdriver, to scratch and dent the instrument, to give a false impression of age. The marks left were rubbed with a dirty pigment mix, to look like old damage.

Thanks for the comment. I meant I’m not sure if this method was used in this violin. For me it looks like an old instrument with marks of age.

Anyone idea of the origin? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Guido said:

Not sure about a revarnish at some point. I don’t see any conclusive indications for it myself.

I can see clearly that remains of a darker colored varnish at the scroll windings and rear, as I pointed out before. Also no kind of varnish shading/wear at the usual spots. This is in my experience always a sign of stripping. OTOH the instrument shows all features of a late 19th century Saxon/Bohemian (what one could call "genuine old", if you like) , including the typical wood choice and the fat scratches of artificial antiquing.

All in all the kind of what is regulary misrepresented as "old Italian", without any idea about what in particular qualifies it as such.

A grafted scroll with bushings isn't unusual for something what started out with a throughneck either. Here it looks simply as done by a not very skilled repair person, what isn't a sign of quality.:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, JH47 said:

Thanks for the comment. I meant I’m not sure if this method was used in this violin. For me it looks like an old instrument with marks of age.

Anyone idea of the origin? 

It does have some age to it. I’d say it is around 120 years old, but is of a type that was made to look old when new.
They made tens of thousands of these, if not more, so a very commonly seen type of violin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Blank face said:

Here we can see very small spots of the original color, too.

Such a condition makes it in general very difficult to tell exactly when and where it was made, if the scroll is original and so on.

IMG_9494.jpeg

I don't know, the only real possible original finish is around the fingerboard - nothing really in this photo.  Usually darker spots are damaged areas that soaked up polished material or past touch up work.  So little of the original finish is there.  The instrument is way too shiny.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the comments! I’ve got different opinions from some experts that it could be Italian or perhaps from Füssen. Scroll probably not original. I’ll let you know if something more concrete is found. 

Yes I know Lauri Kallinen well, he just made the bridge for this violin. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Blank face said:

Who are "some experts"?

A major auction house said that it could be Naples school. But only from the pictures, naturally they would need to see it in person. A London based expert was thinking a great Füssen violin, I don’t want to tell his name in public without his permission. 

The violin is not mine, just doing some research. Btw it has Ealing String certificate stating it’s Lorenzo Ventapane c.1810 but that’s probably not correct.. 
 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...