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Help appraise no label violin


nathanlim

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Hi I would like to buy a violin from private seller. But it is really hard to guess the right price. The seller said the violin is puchased from a store in NJ in 80's. And there is no label and he has no idea about origin or year. How much will be safe to buy this kind of violin. Of course I will hear the sound but wonder value, origin and build quality. Thank you for any advices

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Asking price is $2000 he is a professional musician and uses it as a travel violin not his main instrument. It comes with gewa leather case. Recently brought to a luthier and got cleaning, new soundpost and peg etc.

This is pretty much what I know. 

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3 hours ago, nathanlim said:

Really? Why do you think so?

You can ignore that comment. It is worth more than $200. I suspect it is a well-constructed Chinese violin made with nice materials, and presumably set-up well.

I frankly don't believe that it was somebody's "travel violin" for 40 years. It looks brand new, and new Chinese violins often require replacing sound posts and bridges after import to be set-up for playing well. Cheap pegs may be replaced, too.

As far as pricing goes, that depends a lot on where you live and what is available. Regardless, I think $2,000 is way too high, and I don't think the seller is telling the truth about its history.

Shop around. 

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What is its weight with all hardware off?

That's one of the first things I noticed, and probably what everyone else notices when you first pick up a violin.  If it's on the lighter side, then you know that the plates are probably carved thinner, which can be a good thing.  If it's heavy, then the plates are likely carved thicker, which may or may not be a good thing.

 

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Fluting stopping at 6:00 on the scroll is probably not Chinese, but the pebbly varnish definitely looks low-end production. $2000 is way high for a no- label violin that you haven't seen, or even one that you can evaluate before buying. IMHO: Get a return guarantee, and don't spend more than a few hundred. 

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1 hour ago, GeorgeH said:

You can ignore that comment. It is worth more than $200. I suspect it is a well-constructed Chinese violin made with nice materials, and presumably set-up well.

I frankly don't believe that it was somebody's "travel violin" for 40 years. It looks brand new, and new Chinese violins often require replacing sound posts and bridges after import to be set-up for playing well. Cheap pegs may be replaced, too.

As far as pricing goes, that depends a lot on where you live and what is available. Regardless, I think $2,000 is way too high, and I don't think the seller is telling the truth about its history.

Shop around. 

Thank you for the comments. The seller said he bought it a few years ago and the previous seller bought it 40 years ago. The current seller is a classical musician in NYC and he said he brought it to multiple luthier shops and got different opinion about it. And recently setup and retouched and got a new rondo strings

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