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Information about a Violin


Trivium

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Hello. I know nothing about violins. I have a violin that has been in the family for several generations. It goes back at least as far as my great-great grandfather who died in 1910. Family legend has it that it is his father's violin that was brought from Germany. His father came to America from Germany in 1836. I am wondering if anyone would be able to give me any information on this violin, particularly when and maybe even where it was made.

There is a tag in the violin, and it reads:
"Refurbished and regraded 1904
Jos. S. Meyer, Woodville, O"

Woodville Ohio is the town they settled. I'm assuming the violin has to date to sometime in the 1800s. There is also some Italian written on the back of the violin. I'm not sure how well it turns up in the photographs, and the middle inscription is hard to read as it is is. This is what I am able to make out:

"J.N. SILVIS
VIVA SILVI

OANORA???

JAM MOIVTAUA
CANO"

I appreciate any information you can offer!

Thanks,

Matt

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Thanks for your replies. When you say late 1800s model, how late wood you estimate? 1880s or 1890s? Or could it be earlier like 1860s? Were these decent violins? I can't imagine they are anything greatly special as my ancestors were just farmers. And what about condition? Anything I should do to keep it in good shape?

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1 hour ago, Trivium said:

Thanks for your replies. When you say late 1800s model, how late wood you estimate? 1880s or 1890s? Or could it be earlier like 1860s? Were these decent violins? I can't imagine they are anything greatly special as my ancestors were just farmers. And what about condition? Anything I should do to keep it in good shape?

The violin is presumably made at the end of the 19th C as a common cottage industry object, and the carved/inlayed embellishments decades later. Also large parts of the original dark varnish seems to have been washed off

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