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What is a good violin and explanation of how to buy one.


GeorgeH

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Below are the questions and answers from ChatGPT, an artificial intelligence (AI) natural language chatbox. Each answer was generated in a matter of a few seconds. Interesting world that we're moving into.

Question: What is a good violin?

Answer: A "good" violin is subjective and can vary depending on individual preferences and needs. However, some characteristics that are generally considered when determining the quality of a violin include:

  1. Sound quality: A good violin will have a rich, full sound with good projection and clarity in all registers.
  2. Craftsmanship: A good violin will be expertly crafted with attention to detail, using high-quality materials.
  3. Playability: A good violin will be comfortable to hold and easy to play, with a well-balanced feel and strings that are a comfortable distance from the fingerboard.
  4. Condition: A good violin will be in good condition, with no cracks or repairs that would affect the sound or playability of the instrument.
  5. Brand: Some brands are known for producing high-quality violins, such as Stradivari, Guarneri, and Amati.

It is worth noting that a good violin for a beginner may not be the same as a good violin for a professional player, as the needs and preferences of each player can vary. It is also important to try a few different violins to get a sense of what you like and what suits your playing style.

Question: Explain how to buy a good violin:

Answer: When buying a violin, there are several things to consider:

  1. Sound quality: Look for a violin that has a rich, full sound with good projection. It's best to play the violin in person to assess the sound, but if this is not possible, you can listen to recordings of the violin being played.
  2. Craftsmanship: The craftsmanship of a violin is important, as it affects the sound quality and playability of the instrument. Look for a violin that has been made with care and attention to detail.
  3. Playability: Make sure the violin is comfortable to hold and easy to play. The strings should be a comfortable distance from the fingerboard, and the instrument should be well-balanced.
  4. Price: Violins can range in price from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. It is a good idea to set a budget and stick to it, while also looking for the best quality instrument you can afford.
  5. Brand: It is important to consider the brand of the violin, as some brands are known for producing high-quality instruments.

It is also suggested to look for a professional guidance from an experienced teacher, luthier or violin expert to help you in the process of purchasing a violin.

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For @jacobsaunders Here is how your term “cornerblockology” is understood by AI machines. I think the algorithm mentioned "Tyrol" probably just to annoy you.:lol:

Question: What is “cornerblockology”?

Answer: ”Cornerblockology" is a term used to describe the study of the corner blocks of a violin. Corner blocks are the triangular pieces of wood that are located at the corners of the violin's top and bottom plates, and they play an important role in the overall structural integrity of the instrument.

The study of corner blocks, or cornerblockology, involves examining the construction and design of these pieces in order to determine the age, origin, and authenticity of a violin. This includes analyzing the shape, size, and quality of the wood used, as well as the craftsmanship and details of the inlay and carving.

Corner block designs can vary between different makers and regions. For example, Cremonese makers like Stradivari and Guarneri usually had a distinct style of corner blocks, while makers from other regions like Tyrol had their own styles. This is why cornerblockology can be an important tool in determining the origin and authenticity of a violin.

It's important to note that cornerblockology is an area of expertise and should be performed by a skilled luthier or expert in violin authentication, as it requires a deep knowledge of the field and a close examination of the instrument.

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This is an amazing new world, yes. The ability to take opinion as teachable fact hasn't changed because of this technology... but a friend in Russia sent me some convos with ChatGPT asking things like "How do I lower the B1 mode on the violin I'm building?," and the answers were pretty comprehensive.

I suggest we start posting ridiculous untruths so that these dern machines don't put us out of business pbbbbbbbttttt

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Has the word "cornerblockology" ever been used anywhere other than on this forum?  I know I have never encountered it anywhere else, and a cursory Google search yields only Maestronet citations.  If this word has only appeared here, then the ChatGPT has mostly, if not entirely, just summarized and echoed back to us what we have said here.  And done a pretty good job of it.

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Could be it's out to trick you. Here's my q & a. 

what is "cornerblockology"?

"Cornerblockology" is not a known term or field of study, it seems to be a made-up term, without more context about what this term is supposed to mean, it is impossible for me to provide an accurate description.

write a story about "cornerblockology" in building context.

Once upon a time, in a bustling city, there was a young architect named Jane. Jane was a talented architect, but she had always been fascinated by the role of corner blocks in building construction. She spent hours studying the different types of materials, the angles at which they were cut, and the methods used to secure them to the building's structure.

One day, while working on a skyscraper project, Jane had an epiphany. She realized that by studying the corner blocks in greater detail, she could create buildings that not only looked beautiful but also had superior structural integrity. And thus, the field of "cornerblockology" was born.

Jane spent the next several years of her life dedicated to perfecting her craft. She experimented with different types of materials and different methods of securing the corner blocks to the building's structure. She also studied the physics of building and how it relates to the construction.

Eventually, Jane's hard work paid off. Her buildings were in high demand, and she was considered one of the most skilled architects in the city. She even began to teach others about cornerblockology, passing on her knowledge and techniques to the next generation of architects.

Word of Jane's incredible buildings spread far and wide, and soon people from all over the world were coming to the city to learn from her. Cornerblockology became a respected field of study, and Jane's name became synonymous with the art of building construction.

And so, even though Jane had only been interested in corner blocks, her curiosity and dedication lead to the creation of a whole new field of study, and her buildings still are considered some of the most structurally sound in the world.

It's important to note that this story is purely fictional and it's not based on any real field of study, "cornerblockology" is a made-up term.

 

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6 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Below are the questions and answers from ChatGPT, an artificial intelligence (AI) natural language chatbox. Each answer was generated in a matter of a few seconds. Interesting world that we're moving into.

Question: What is a good violin?

Answer: A "good" violin is subjective and can vary depending on individual preferences and needs. However, some characteristics that are generally considered when determining the quality of a violin include:

  1. Sound quality: A good violin will have a rich, full sound with good projection and clarity in all registers.
  2. Craftsmanship: A good violin will be expertly crafted with attention to detail, using high-quality materials.
  3. Playability: A good violin will be comfortable to hold and easy to play, with a well-balanced feel and strings that are a comfortable distance from the fingerboard.
  4. Condition: A good violin will be in good condition, with no cracks or repairs that would affect the sound or playability of the instrument.
  5. Brand: Some brands are known for producing high-quality violins, such as Stradivari, Guarneri, and Amati.

It is worth noting that a good violin for a beginner may not be the same as a good violin for a professional player, as the needs and preferences of each player can vary. It is also important to try a few different violins to get a sense of what you like and what suits your playing style.

Question: Explain how to buy a good violin:

Answer: When buying a violin, there are several things to consider:

  1. Sound quality: Look for a violin that has a rich, full sound with good projection. It's best to play the violin in person to assess the sound, but if this is not possible, you can listen to recordings of the violin being played.
  2. Craftsmanship: The craftsmanship of a violin is important, as it affects the sound quality and playability of the instrument. Look for a violin that has been made with care and attention to detail.
  3. Playability: Make sure the violin is comfortable to hold and easy to play. The strings should be a comfortable distance from the fingerboard, and the instrument should be well-balanced.
  4. Price: Violins can range in price from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. It is a good idea to set a budget and stick to it, while also looking for the best quality instrument you can afford.
  5. Brand: It is important to consider the brand of the violin, as some brands are known for producing high-quality instruments.

It is also suggested to look for a professional guidance from an experienced teacher, luthier or violin expert to help you in the process of purchasing a violin.

1.  Aside from how it sounds, which I consider most important...2.  How light is the violin?  I've come across violins that sound good but are on the heavy side and the owner who played in the symphony wanted something that didn't weigh as much.  

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42 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

Can we conclude from Bill’s interactions that the word “cornerblockology” is unknown outside of Maestronet?  And that our own Jacob has introduced a new word into the English language?

I think that the ChatGPT was answering my question in the context of my previous questions about violins, so it identified “cornerblockology” as having to do with violins. I don't know in what context Bill asked his question.

13 minutes ago, stringcheese said:

The problem with artificial intelligence is that, unless there is real intelligence behind it, it is often more artificial than intelligent.

This is only Version 1, and it is already getting B+ grades in exams designed for graduate operations management students at Wharton. It is measurably intelligent.

Machine intelligence is destined to supersede human intelligence at some point in the not too distant future. "The singularity" is inevitable if we can avoid extinction.

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7 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Below are the questions and answers from ChatGPT, an artificial intelligence (AI) natural language chatbox. Each answer was generated in a matter of a few seconds. Interesting world that we're moving into.

Question: What is a good violin?

Answer: A "good" violin is subjective and can vary depending on individual preferences and needs. However, some characteristics that are generally considered when determining the quality of a violin include:

  1. Sound quality: A good violin will have a rich, full sound with good projection and clarity in all registers.
  2. Craftsmanship: A good violin will be expertly crafted with attention to detail, using high-quality materials.
  3. Playability: A good violin will be comfortable to hold and easy to play, with a well-balanced feel and strings that are a comfortable distance from the fingerboard.
  4. Condition: A good violin will be in good condition, with no cracks or repairs that would affect the sound or playability of the instrument.
  5. Brand: Some brands are known for producing high-quality violins, such as Stradivari, Guarneri, and Amati.

It is worth noting that a good violin for a beginner may not be the same as a good violin for a professional player, as the needs and preferences of each player can vary. It is also important to try a few different violins to get a sense of what you like and what suits your playing style.

Question: Explain how to buy a good violin:

Answer: When buying a violin, there are several things to consider:

  1. Sound quality: Look for a violin that has a rich, full sound with good projection. It's best to play the violin in person to assess the sound, but if this is not possible, you can listen to recordings of the violin being played.
  2. Craftsmanship: The craftsmanship of a violin is important, as it affects the sound quality and playability of the instrument. Look for a violin that has been made with care and attention to detail.
  3. Playability: Make sure the violin is comfortable to hold and easy to play. The strings should be a comfortable distance from the fingerboard, and the instrument should be well-balanced.
  4. Price: Violins can range in price from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. It is a good idea to set a budget and stick to it, while also looking for the best quality instrument you can afford.
  5. Brand: It is important to consider the brand of the violin, as some brands are known for producing high-quality instruments.

It is also suggested to look for a professional guidance from an experienced teacher, luthier or violin expert to help you in the process of purchasing a violin.

If you buy a violin to have fun with below let's say for $5000 or less, buy what you like, what sounds good to your ears is good if there is no hole in it. Many of these not so popular German 'Markies' or even a Chinese will do the job. Many old German violins have great sound. Chinese mass produces should be below $2000, some are quite good. Don't expect a gain from resale.

If you are looking for aesthetic beauty and workmanship and sound at a decent price ... this is more difficult. Try German: Winterling, Gärtner and the likes you get below $10000 (or at least <$20000) with a bit of luck. These are often very good instruments.

If you like older violins, Kloz and the likes are often a great choice at a low price, but not good as concert instruments. I love my Kloz fiddles, some have a unique sound at a reasonable price because they are currently not so popular. You find Engilsh makers in the same league with a great sound. 

Good French are usually more expensive, Derazey, Hel, Blanchard, Barbé - these are often beauties but you need to be careful, lots of copies and some of those makers also sold mass produced fiddles. Gand&Bernardel and Sylvestre are good names, but even more expensive.

If you choose Italian you will pay more. There were many good makers, but you need to start from $50000. I am still looking for a nice Degani. Sderci is also at the lower end. But there were hundreds of good Italian makers, Bisiach, Antoniazzi are good ways to make a simple violinist happy. You should be able to get happy for below $250.000.

If you are willing to spend a lot more than 150.000$ a whole world opens up. You can get rid of a million if you need to. 

Sound quality affects selllability but not value. A good playable starter around $2000. A good violin for a decent amateur starts around $10-20k. Everything above gives me fever. 

If you want optimal sound looking like old Italian or better: There are thousands, some active here. You should find happiness for around $30.000. You will find one who charges $100.000 and less unknown names for around $20,000.    

If you want something below $1000 with a pretty good sound: Go to eBay, yitaviolins makes ok ones. I bought one of those just our of curiosity and a young professional player thought it was something special (even though people here would identify it as Chinese in minutes after posting).  

At least you can get something cheap with great sound - for a Porsche with great sound you pay a lot more.

 

     

 

 

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2 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

I think that the ChatGPT was answering my question in the context of my previous questions about violins, so it identified “cornerblockology” as having to do with violins. I don't know in what context Bill asked his question.

I started with no context.  It seems to pick up a context, so it went into violin corner blocks for you.  In my case It may have been thinking still of its its invented meaning for the term in the story.  Maybe I could have steered it into knowing what violin corner blocks are, since it has appeared to know.  The buzzword term they use for AI giving answers that break with reality is "hallucinating" (e.g. there is no such thing as violin corner blocks).  Once I asked it if it hallucinates, and it told me it was impossible since it was only a computer program...

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It seems to know the old forgiving vs agile dichotomy...

which is easier to fly, a piper 140 or a cessna 172?

...the Cessna 172 is considered to be more stable and easier to fly due to its larger size and more forgiving flight characteristics. However, the Piper PA-28 Cherokee 140 is considered to be more agile and sporty to fly. Ultimately, it will depend on the individual pilot's preferences and flight experience.

 

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is there a trade off between forgiving vs agility in general?

In general, there may be a trade-off between forgiveness and agility. Forgiveness generally refers to the ability to withstand and recover from mistakes or failures, while agility refers to the ability to quickly and easily adapt to changing circumstances or requirements. If a system or organization is highly forgiving, it may be less agile because it has built-in redundancies and fail-safes that can slow down decision making and action-taking. On the other hand, if a system or organization is highly agile, it may be less forgiving because it may not have the same level of built-in redundancies and fail-safes that can prevent or mitigate mistakes or failures.

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16 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Below are the questions and answers from ChatGPT, an artificial intelligence (AI) natural language chatbox. Each answer was generated in a matter of a few seconds. Interesting world that we're moving into..................................

You have been warned..........  :ph34r: 

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, Bill Merkel said:

After i spent some time confusing it...

are corner blocks part of a violin?

Corner blocks are not a part of a violin. They are an abstract concept that was used in the story as a fictional technique for image recognition. In the context of a violin, corner blocks would not have any relevance or meaning.

We're going to have to clone you Bill, we will need field commanders in the war against the machines, we need troops to be trained in captcha english so they don't become unalive'd

even if, an unlikely if, we don't create machines that turn on us, we will still need to factor in the inevitable "mouse utopia" results that surely will come with with ai mechanical slavery

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15 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

I think that the ChatGPT was answering my question in the context of my previous questions about violins,

Uh oh, that means that it's already tracking you. :o

15 hours ago, stringcheese said:

The problem with artificial intelligence is that, unless there is real intelligence behind it, it is often more artificial than intelligent.

Who's to say that humans aren't already a form of artificial intelligence, but built on a biological framework which is already capable of self-reproducing?
And how far do humans get without the intelligence and learning of previous generations behind them?

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2 hours ago, jezzupe said:

even if, an unlikely if, we don't create machines that turn on us, we will still need to factor in the inevitable "mouse utopia" results that surely will come with with ai mechanical slavery

There's a way around this, but you wind up having to crew your starships with a secretive cult of mutated druggies...........

dune-spacing-guild-.thumb.jpg.0d2379f7238a9b5e6f9b77208ad1eefa.jpg

 

:lol:

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