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Wood color.


Nick Allen

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16 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

I will. Would you recommend a particular wood species to burn?

 

16 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I've just used plate cutoffs, more maple than spruce. It would be interesting to try oak or walnut at some point though, maybe the tannin content would do something interesting 

Hello Nick and Jackson. Many years ago I read the medieval treatise "On Diverse Arts" by Theophilus and recalled something about the use of beech wood as being used in glass making in the past to produce certain desired effects, so I looked on wikipedia and found this (Copied from here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_stained_glass )

"The potash (K2O) found in Forest Glass was derived from wood ash. In De diversis artibus, Theophilus describes the use of beech wood as the preferred source of ash.[12] Other plant matter, such as bracken, was also used.[13] As well as containing potash, beech ash comprises an assortment of compounds including iron and manganese oxides, which are particularly important for generating colour in glass. "

So I wonder if beech ash would be good to use when colouring wood as perhaps the manganese oxides may act to help any linseed oil coats dry?

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11 minutes ago, Andrew tkinson said:

 

Hello Nick and Jackson. Many years ago I read the medieval treatise "On Diverse Arts" by Theophilus and recalled something about the use of beech wood as being used in glass making in the past to produce certain desired effects, so I looked on wikipedia and found this (Copied from here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_stained_glass )

"The potash (K2O) found in Forest Glass was derived from wood ash. In De diversis artibus, Theophilus describes the use of beech wood as the preferred source of ash.[12] Other plant matter, such as bracken, was also used.[13] As well as containing potash, beech ash comprises an assortment of compounds including iron and manganese oxides, which are particularly important for generating colour in glass. "

So I wonder if beech ash would be good to use when colouring wood as perhaps the manganese oxides may act to help any linseed oil coats dry?

"Divers artes" is a very interesting book! It's been a while and I had forgotten about this bit, thanks for bringing it up.

I think we gotta clear some stuff up on "potash". It's a catch all for potassium compounds that comes from a time when we didn't even know potassium was a thing unto itself. The name comes from soaking ash in water, in a pot. Pot Ash. Over time, the term came to be qualified with other words. Example - caustic potash or potassa lye are potassium hydroxide. 

MikeC has possibly inadvertently brought an interesting point to the fore by using the term potash lye interchangeably with potash - but potassium hydroxide is generally a small (and thank goodness for that) constituent of traditional pot ash, whereas the carbonate (aka pearl ash, carbonate of potash, etc) predominates. 

Traditionally made potash, which were discussing here, is a whole host of potassium and other salts - carbonate, hydroxide, oxides, chlorides, permanganates, etc. It's that variety and complexity that makes it worth bothering with as opposed to using single lab reagents. 

As to the value of the manganese content in a application of potash to wood before varnishing in encouraging the film curing, it's probably non-zero but almost virtually zero, if you follow my meaning. You'd have more luck with washing the oil with manganese salt (extremely effective) or even cooking the washed oil over umber. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/1/2023 at 1:56 PM, Shunyata said:

I am experimenting with Manifio’s wood ash solution (weak base, with color from the wood ash itself).  

I have to say this is an amazing wood colorant.  It gives even coloration pretty much no matter how you apply it.  The color is a nice yellow-brown.  It pops the flames but preserves the natural look of the flames - no burning of the flames.

Currently I am testing how it holds up when you have spots of removed glue. (Wiped with water before setting, dried and cleaned with water, etc.)

Do you have any pictures please ? 

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7 hours ago, Arsalan said:

Do you have any pictures please ? 

Here are images of the wood ash treatment.  There is ZERO blotchiness in the spruce, which is a huge improvement over any other treatment I have used.

What is not clear from the pictures is that there is no burning of the flames and they keep their original depth.

IMG_0564.jpeg

IMG_0565.jpeg

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On 9/17/2023 at 9:16 AM, Wood Butcher said:

Can this solution be used on spruce? If so, how does it look? Will the spruce turn blotchy?

Always (not always!) damp a white scraped plate before applying stain or nitric reaction solution. Blotchiness is greatly reduced, if not eliminated-- if the wood is well-finished at all. I use denatured (meths) alcohol usually, but it can mess with the pH of alkaline solutions, so hot water is just fine...

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1 hour ago, Christopher Jacoby said:

Always (not always!) damp a white scraped plate before applying stain or nitric reaction solution. Blotchiness is greatly reduced, if not eliminated-- if the wood is well-finished at all.

I have seen that damping helps with potassium nitrite.  It doesn’t really seem to help with potassium permanganate.  (Although I like the color, KMnO4 is pretty aggressive, and especially highlights any irregularity in surface smoothness.)

Van Dyke crystals are on my list to experiment with.

The wood ash solution is dead even no matter what you do… foolproof.

Also a correction to my original comment on wood ash solution…. Manifio recommends a 2:1 solution of water:ash, boiled for two hours.  That is what I used.  The boiled solution behaves very differently from unboiled.

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2 hours ago, Christopher Jacoby said:

Always (not always!) damp a white scraped plate before applying stain or nitric reaction solution. Blotchiness is greatly reduced, if not eliminated-- if the wood is well-finished at all. I use denatured (meths) alcohol usually, but it can mess with the pH of alkaline solutions, so hot water is just fine...

Thank you for your advice, this is much appreciated.

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