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Hans J. Nebel


John Alexander

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You can get his contact information from the American Federation of Violin and Bow Makers website.  This is his bridge and his system for numbering instruments that he has sold.  He puts the H after the number to prevent confusion with the Hill shop's numbers, which had the H first.  He will have records for this violin.

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53 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

You can get his contact information from the American Federation of Violin and Bow Makers website.  This is his bridge and his system for numbering instruments that he has sold.  He puts the H after the number to prevent confusion with the Hill shop's numbers, which had the H first.  He will have meticulous records for this violin.

I thought he was listed on the AFVBM site as well, but haven’t been able to find him there.

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Mr. Nebel returned my request.  He was very prompt and friendly.  Turns out he worked on and sold the instrument in 1992.  I never would have imagined the set up was 30 years old!  The upper strings are now sounding a bit muffled.  I going to bring it in to my local luthier for a check up and sound adjustment.

Thank you again for your help!

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28 minutes ago, John Alexander said:

Mr. Nebel returned my request.  He was very prompt and friendly.  Turns out he worked on and sold the instrument in 1992.  I never would have imagined the set up was 30 years old!  The upper strings are now sounding a bit muffled.  I going to bring it in to my local luthier for a check up and sound adjustment.

Thank you again for your help!

Prompt response and precision in every aspect is how he operates. He keeps detailed records on every instrument and customer that passes through his workshop. I am sure your conversion from today was throughly documented on one of his index cards that he attaches to the file folder of each of his customers.

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39 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

One thing I don't understand, is why the fingerboard end is thicker in the centre, than at the edges? Pretty much every violin I've played, has the end of the fingerboard shaped so that the end, is an equal thickness across.

Have you played one of his? He does work for some of the most prestigious players out there, and there probably aren't too many complaints about the way he does things.

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16 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

One thing I don't understand, is why the fingerboard end is thicker in the centre, than at the edges? Pretty much every violin I've played, has the end of the fingerboard shaped so that the end, is an equal thickness across.

I would guess that the board started with an even thickness, but was rounded afterwards so that the outer edges became thinner. From what I’m seeing at the photo, the surface of the board looks more rounded than what I’m used to see.

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Leaving the fingerboard slightly thicker in the center was standard in well made Wurlitzer, Francais shop fb's (and likely others as well)

It provides more stability when the fingerboard gets old and thin, so the chances of the fb feeling like a diving board are lessened.  And, as has been pointed out, it looks good.  It's still the standard way of making a fb for workers who've been through one of those shops or worked with alumni of those shops.

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2 hours ago, Philip Perret said:

Leaving the fingerboard slightly thicker in the center was standard in well made Wurlitzer, Francais shop fb's (and likely others as well)

It provides more stability when the fingerboard gets old and thin, so the chances of the fb feeling like a diving board are lessened.  And, as has been pointed out, it looks good.  It's still the standard way of making a fb for workers who've been through one of those shops or worked with alumni of those shops.

Even though it's not what is widely taught, I do like the look of it when it's well done and deliberate. I think I'll incorporate it into my own work. 

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When I make a new fingerboard, the end curvature is 43mm on the top surface and exactly the same on the bottom one, leaving two exactly parallel arcs. I thick there is a bit of a tendency to make new fingerboards pretty chunky, and this one look a little thick. Worries about any springboard feeling seem well misplaced there

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2 hours ago, Philip Perret said:

Leaving the fingerboard slightly thicker in the center was standard in well made Wurlitzer, Francais shop fb's (and likely others as well)

It provides more stability when the fingerboard gets old and thin, so the chances of the fb feeling like a diving board are lessened.  And, as has been pointed out, it looks good.  It's still the standard way of making a fb for workers who've been through one of those shops or worked with alumni of those shops.

Hans Weisshaar worked in both the Emil Herrmann and the Wurlitzer shops in New York, along with Sacconi. I was taught to remove a bunch of wood from under the fingerboard, leaving the bridge end profile both more uniform and thinner, and I continued to do so until a little while after I left the Weisshaar shop. Later, I came on board with the advantages of leaving the fingerboard much thicker.  But I still copy the rather elegant look of that profile by making a heavy, variable width chamfer at the end of the fingerboard, which does not compromise the strength. It may not leave enough room for a Nebel stamp, or if it does, the upper part of it could be planed away by subsequent fingerboard dressings.

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38 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

 I was taught to remove a bunch of wood from under the fingerboard, leaving the bridge end profile both more uniform and thinner, and I continued to do so until a little while after I left the Weisshaar shop. Later, I came on board with the advantages of leaving the fingerboard much thicker. 

Getting lazy in your old age?:)

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I was also initially taught to leave the bridge end thinner (the last few/several mm or so tapered thinner)... which made transition from school to David's shop easier as far as boards go. Really can't see that leaving that last bit thicker would cause any difference in flex.  Over the years, I've ended up the board a little thicker at the end, however... essentially just following the hollow area straight through to a more-or-less even thickness at the end.  Just decided I liked the way it looked... but that could always change tomorrow.  :) 

Never cared for the that much rounding on the upper edge... a smaller chamfer rounded over slightly seems more appealing to me (and my clients have always seemed to find it comfortable), but like many things, that opinion/taste is also subject to change.

Agree with, emulate, or dislike the style, nice work is always pleasant to see.

 

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On 12/19/2022 at 2:24 PM, Philip Perret said:

Leaving the fingerboard slightly thicker in the center was standard in well made Wurlitzer, Francais shop fb's (and likely others as well)

It provides more stability when the fingerboard gets old and thin, so the chances of the fb feeling like a diving board are lessened.  And, as has been pointed out, it looks good.  It's still the standard way of making a fb for workers who've been through one of those shops or worked with alumni of those shops.

Thank you for explaining this method. While I can see the theory behind it, I’m not of the opinion that the wood left here, will produce the benefit you suggest.
The general way, seems to be to chamfer the underside of the fingerboard for the last 10mm or so, to lighten the appearance, and match the thickness to the sides. The rest of the underside is thicker than the end, to ensure the board is sufficiently sturdy.
 

What does make a difference, is how close, or otherwise, to the end of the neck the underside scoop begins. I consider this a more important factor.

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