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New purchase, German, French or new Chinese????


Strad O Various Jr.
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Had a professional player/teacher friend from the local symphony come and trial the violin, it sounded decent when she played still she thought $1500 would be pushing it and it was worth closer to $1000, so big waste of money on my part as I have about 20 violins roughly in that price range and hardly need another.

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Thank you for posting your experience--we all learn from the shared stories. Hopefully it won't cost you too much. Did it come in with a case and bow? I'd imagine those also give some hints.

Just a question--on something like this is there a middle point between doing a full set-up and buying as is? Could you have put $35 strings on in ten minutes and had an idea of the sound? Also, when you go to sell something like this, how do you do it? Do you just say, 'I think this is a 30 year old Eastern European violin with a fake label?'

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6 hours ago, Cincitaipei said:

Thank you for posting your experience--we all learn from the shared stories. Hopefully it won't cost you too much. Did it come in with a case and bow? I'd imagine those also give some hints.

Just a question--on something like this is there a middle point between doing a full set-up and buying as is? Could you have put $35 strings on in ten minutes and had an idea of the sound? Also, when you go to sell something like this, how do you do it? Do you just say, 'I think this is a 30 year old Eastern European violin with a fake label?'

It came with a decent case but no bow.

The violin didn't even have a soundpost, there was no way to test the sound, Its rare that a violin for sale comes in the shop in good enough set up that one can make any judgement about the tone without doing a full set up. You run the risk of thinking the violin is no good just because the set up is so bad, so I try to withhold judgment of tone until the violin is fully restored, and judge purchases more on quality of condition, construction and region of manufacture.

Even on a cheaper violin I always try to do the best set up to get the best possible sound the violin is capable of, to the best of my ability

And yes of course I will tell customers that it is a newer probably Eastern European violin with a totally fake label, no point in lying to my customers, that's bad for business

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  • 2 weeks later...
5 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

Is that a reliable rule?  I have this that I always assumed was Chinese.

 

P1080670.png

I think this is actually done in a few places now.

A friend of mine who studied in Cremona said that this was also starting to be taught there (in the state school).

You can see an example here https://miocannone.com/cremona-violin-by-andrea-cabrini-cremona-2022/ and there are many other examples about.

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3 hours ago, Bill Merkel said:

Is that a reliable rule?  I have this that I always assumed was Chinese.

Daryl is right. The step is quite common now from makers all over the world, as well as from upper-echelon restorers when doing neck grafts.

The main reasons?

1. At some point in the life of a violin, the fingerboard gluing surface of the neck will probably need to be resurfaced, and it's nice to be able to do this with a plane without shaving off the top of the pegbox, like as happened on so many valuable old violins, wimpifying the original side view of the the scroll.
2. A little extra material allows planing one end or the other to make minor adjustment in fingerboard projection, which always changes over time.

I don't see any advantage in failing to anticipate what will typically happen to a violin over its lifetime. And the step isn't really anything new. The Weisshaar shop was already doing this when I started working there in 1971, and I will presume that this wasn't some innovation of Hans, but was standard practice much earlier in the Hermann and Wurlitzer shops.

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This is really interesting. I had heretofore only noticed it on Bulgarian workshop violins, plus one violin that I have that came from a dealer/ maker in Cremona. I am going to start a thread on the Italian violin, because I don't quite know what to make of it, nor how to present it when I go to sell it. The step makes a lot of sense, because I run into a lot of old violins that have problems with their necks that a little extra room would make it easier to deal with.

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13 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

If you know someone else who graduated from the Geigenbauschule in Mittenwald around 1932, we can ask them. ;)

In Vienna I actually lived next door to Michael Nowy, who constantly proudly showed me photographs of his sitting next to his classmate Weißhaar in the Mittenwald school. Unfortunately, you would need a medium to ask him though:)

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