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Fluted f hole wings


tetler
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Fluted wings were initially a 1600-1750 Cremonese feature, more or less extreme or stylized depending on the specific maker. As these violins became more widely respected the practice spread. Some makers never got the message even now, some did, some were extreme in their effort. Rather than being an indication of school, the feature and its variations are now one of the many tiny clues used to identify a specific maker.

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1 hour ago, Michael Darnton said:

Fluted wings were initially a 1600-1750 Cremonese feature, more or less extreme or stylized depending on the specific maker. As these violins became more widely respected the practice spread. Some makers never got the message even now, some did, some were extreme in their effort. Rather than being an indication of school, the feature and its variations are now one of the many tiny clues used to identify a specific maker.

I see. Seems like it spread to France first. Or have you seen it in old Germanic instruments too? 

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5 minutes ago, tetler said:

An instrument from the German speaking parts of Europe, I guess. Don't arrest me when I'm trying to be vague!:ph34r: Let's call it "non-French and non-Italian" instead 

That includes everything from chalk to cheese with all shades between, some with fluting, others not. Both “French” and “Italian” are massive spectra too

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10 minutes ago, tetler said:

So fluted wings does not exclude any region/period? Have you seen it on e.g. Vogtland instruments from before 1900 too? 

I haven't personally, but they produced endless millions.  To answer that by proving the negative, you'd have to collect them all.......................  :ph34r: :huh: :lol:

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8 minutes ago, tetler said:

So fluted wings does not exclude any region/period? Have you seen it on e.g. Vogtland instruments from before 1900 too? 

There are definitely Saxony and Bohemia made violins with fluted ff from the early 19th century onwards, though often carved roughly. I’ve seen a Mittenwald from probably before 1800 with this feature, too. If this was what you were asking, though but all very different schools.

 Would you call Tecchler, Goffriller or Landolfi “Germanics”, too?

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16 hours ago, GoPractice said:

How does one arrive at a choice to flute? And how should they flute?

I'd say flute if you feel like it, and do it with whatever tool gives you the look you're going for. Probably a gouge selected for the task, in my case one of my scroll gouges. The design of the F and it's placement will give you ideas about how much, etc

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