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Help with shooting board?


Crimson0087
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So I sharpened the plane...it's pretty sharp I think...I used a jig that holds the angle and progressed through 8,000 whet stone...then I raised the angle just barely to get a "micro bevel" saw that tip on YouTube. I'm getting much better shavings in the clamp. I built the shooting board and after I built it I made a few passes against the plywood to cut the plywood a little just leaving the 1/4 inch that the plane doesn't take bc the blade doesn't go to the edge...now I'm trying to use the shooting board on some scrap and on the violin back and I can't seem to get it to cut it ...am I not pressing hard enough? Blade still dull? Not sure what it is....it does take a little force when in the clamp to get the long shavings but not as much as before...any ideas/tips? Anyone on here live near Sharpsburg ga lol. Also. I noticed my plane blades are slightly curved as in when I rise it out of plane it starts cutting at the center and not at the sides...should I leave it and continue to sharpen it like this or should I sharpen it till it's perfectly flat 

20221020_212426.jpg

20221020_212138.jpg

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Are your stones flat?  You should know whether your blade is sharp or not. If you’re not comfortable shaving hair from your arm it’s probably best to test using a different method. I often use the flat of my thumb nail. If the blade is sharp it should stick to your nail instead of sliding. Or you can try cutting paper. 

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You have to have plenty of clearance away from the side of the shooting board. It looks like the plane is right up against it. The idea is to plane the maple edge not the shooting board.

The plane blade needs to have a straight edge so your stones need to be flat. You can dress them flat with a fairly coarse diamond plate or on a sheet of plate glass, flat steel, a flat stone slab like granite, or wet and dry sandpaper taped to a flat surface.

If you are dealing with a narrow bevel as you say you should be able to start sharpening with a good 1000 grit stone finishing with a finer one about 4000 to finish.

 

 

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I'm in GA but down below Macon, looks like you're up near Atlanta.   Curved edge on the plane blade means it's crowned which is normal for planes since it prevents the corners leaving a mark when planing wide boards but for the narrow jointing of a plate edge I think a straight plane blade would be ok though it should work either way.   

I think 8,000 grit should be enough to make it razor sharp but I like to finish the sharpenign with a strop with the green polishing compound. I don't know what grit that is.  

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On 10/21/2022 at 6:42 AM, MikeC said:

I'm in GA but down below Macon, looks like you're up near Atlanta.   Curved edge on the plane blade means it's crowned which is normal for planes since it prevents the corners leaving a mark when planing wide boards but for the narrow jointing of a plate edge I think a straight plane blade would be ok though it should work either way.   

I think 8,000 grit should be enough to make it razor sharp but I like to finish the sharpenign with a strop with the green polishing compound. I don't know what grit that is.  

If it's the Lee Valley stuff, it is somewhere around 60k grit, or 0.5 microns. 

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I posted my version of a shooting board in the other thread, here.

It's hard to get pressure sideways, so I found that mounting the plane blade-up works best for me.  You could also clamp the wood in the vise, but with the plane in the vise, you don't need to clamp and unclamp the wood if you want to plane each half, or if you want to do several sets.

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5 minutes ago, Peter K-G said:

Crimson,

You are quick!

Moving on to the shooting board, some never did, like me, never will!

Shooting board or not, its still about THE PLANE. No shortcuts.

Crimson, so I looked at you pictures, The plane needs to go to recycle.

Sorry, you really, really should focus on THE PLANE!!!

Shooting board or not. It is the plane!

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Looks like the cambered blade is your first issue. It may be caused by your sharpening technique or by dished stones. On your dry stones, use a straight edge. If there is any light, they need to be flattened. A DMT Diaflat works wonders. Sandpaper on a surface plate can get you out of a bind if you already have a surface plate. Sandpaper on a piece of marble threshold from Lowe's is also acceptable.

That handplane does not look to be the greatest. I would question how square the sides are to the sole. Get a machinist square and find out. It's not a deal breaker if it's not square, it will just make things very annoying and difficult on the shooting board. You will have to make sure the blade edge is perpendicular to the plane side that's sliding on the shooting board.

When you are planing edge grain let it overhang some. You don't want to bottom out against the shooting board rail.

For those that will question me on the threshold suggestion, one day I went to Lowe's with a 36" straight edge and feeler gauges. I measured a dozen thresholds. They were all flat within 0.002" along the entire length. No guarantee that all batches are like this, but short of anything better, it should do.

good luck,
Cosmin

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35 minutes ago, Peter K-G said:

Crimson, so I looked at you pictures, The plane needs to go to recycle.

Sorry, you really, really should focus on THE PLANE!!!

Shooting board or not. It is the plane!

I'm not here to judge, but I did not succeed until I got this:

https://www.dictum.com/en/dictum-planes-baed/dictum-jointer-plane-no-7-japanese-blade-703375

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2 hours ago, Peter K-G said:

Crimson, so I looked at you pictures, The plane needs to go to recycle.

Sorry, you really, really should focus on THE PLANE!!!

Shooting board or not. It is the plane!

Peter, I guess I'm not seeing what you're seeing. I have no idea what kind of plane that is, but it should be up to the job if it's tuned and working correctly. Of course, that's a big if, but I have no way of knowing unless I'm physically inspecting the plane. But in general, I think most metal planes can be tuned up well enough to produce nearly perfect surfaces and joints. A premium plane is much nicer to use, but it's not required.

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22 hours ago, Steve Voigt said:

Peter, I guess I'm not seeing what you're seeing. I have no idea what kind of plane that is, but it should be up to the job if it's tuned and working correctly. Of course, that's a big if, but I have no way of knowing unless I'm physically inspecting the plane. But in general, I think most metal planes can be tuned up well enough to produce nearly perfect surfaces and joints. A premium plane is much nicer to use, but it's not required.

That plane was an example that made me understand all the questions asked here and all the answers, that are actually pointless. Because you won't get the answers before you plane with such a plane, that is so awesome that all you questions asked are,,, well pointless, because then you understand what people here are trying to say!

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14 minutes ago, Peter K-G said:

I guess I still have a question, why shooting board?

If you just want a planed surface to be flat, you don't need it.  If you want the planed surface to be square to another surface, you need it.  Maybe not "need", if you want to cut/check/cut a lot, but it is convenient.

If you plane both halves at once, there's less of a need.  You can make a good joint that isn't exactly perpendicular to another surface, but so what.

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6 minutes ago, Don Noon said:

If you just want a planed surface to be flat, you don't need it.  If you want the planed surface to be square to another surface, you need it.  Maybe not "need", if you want to cut/check/cut a lot, but it is convenient.

If you plane both halves at once, there's less of a need.  You can make a good joint that isn't exactly perpendicular to another surface, but so what.

Yes, well said!

I plane both halves and they fit perfectly, not possible without a great plane.

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