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Sharpening quality chisels and gouges


Arsalan
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I've had a chance now to sharpen the Veritas PM-V plane blade, and do some minor work with it, as well as having put some minor use on the block plane I ordered at the same time, so I'm about ready to post some first impressions. But rather than doing so in this already very lengthy thread, I'll probably start a new thread, and edit this post to include a link to it.

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19 hours ago, violins88 said:

To Hogo:

dobré odpoledne

I worked in Praha in 1991. Are the Czechs making PM steel?

:-)

Back in 1991 we were still together as Czechoslovakia, now I'm in Slovakia. I'm not aware of any high end steel production here, just plain construction steel and common grades of tool steels. I guess the PM processes are covered by patents of few big companies so they are not widely employed around globe.

I became interested in the PM-V11 after the big antree and (being math teacher) considered their grading quite odd, to say the least, so I wanted to know what it really is under the fake name. Just from pure interest as my best edges are still old school "cast steel" laminated blades for chisels and my old Stanley #6 jointer.

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On 10/24/2022 at 10:29 AM, David Burgess said:

I've had a chance now to sharpen the Veritas PM-V plane blade, and do some minor work with it, as well as having put some minor use on the block plane I ordered at the same time, so I'm about ready to post some first impressions. But rather than doing so in this already very lengthy thread, I'll probably start a new thread, and edit this post to include a link to it.

@David BurgessLooking forward to your initial findings based on real world usage. 

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KOOK (Keeper Of Odd Knowledge) Trivia - modern techniques of using Powdered Metal to form parts is called "MIM" - Metal Injection Molding 

What is MIM?

Developed in the 1950's and improved in the 1990s, MIM is a process that merges two established technologies: plastic injection molding and powdered metallurgy. It is capable of producing precise, complex parts in large quantities with metals that are not capable of being die cast—like stainless steel and other low alloy steels.

Is MIM strong?
Improved properties - MIM parts are typically 95% to 98% dense, approaching wrought material properties. MIM parts achieve greater strength, better corrosion resistance, and improved magnetic properties when compared to conventional powder metallurgy processes.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got this today.  It's not a bad concept if it were made of better quality materials.  Seems like 3D printed plastic.  Probably has plastic bearings.    It works barely but if it had good quality ball bearing and a better clamp to hold the gouge it would be usable.  

I think a good design would be to have a good clamp inside a round metal housing then you could move it side to side while at the same time rotating it.  

 

jig.jpg

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