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Can't take fingerboard and nut off


James Leong
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9 hours ago, James Leong said:

Apparently the previous 'luthier' who've worked on this violin stuck on the finger with a weird super sticky substance, possibly tidebond and the fingerboard & nut is not coming off easily like it should

 

I recall a 'cello that required a guitar fingerboard heating blanket to allow removal...

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If it's white glue/pva, I would carefully use an iron with no water in it. I had a cello fingerboard, a nice cello, that was all pva glued together for some reason, where I used a clothes iron to carefully and patiently work the FB off over the course of 40 minutes or so. Use the iron with a little bit of white vinegar. Heat up the whole board, while concentrating on the area that the knife is in, too. Don't hold the iron in one spot for too long, especially at the heel where the top is. 

Good luck. If it's Gorilla glue/epoxy, just saw the extension end off near the heel and plane the board off. 

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9 hours ago, James Leong said:

@jezzupe there is a coating of ground on the neck on the violin, it actually makes the neck pretty smooth and i don't want to melt the coating on the neck.

Unless the "coating" is wax or shellac, it will not "melt" and assuming it is one of the 2, they are easily "redone" ...and well if your going to do it right, the fingerboard imo should not be "coated" with anything. It could be "sealed" with an oil or sometimes pumice and a drop of varnish, so as Nathan suggests your probably going to be doing some finish work to get it back to playability anyway.

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8 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I've used a cheap, lap sized heating blanket to good effect for these things, wrapping the neck with them and coming back and hour later to work at it a bit, before rewrapping it and leaving again. Lots of good advice above 

Never had any luck with these based on the modern design having auto shut off after 15 min for safety, I do like the pipe tape because you can generally control the temp with a built in thermostat and they are made to run day and night if needed, as well as being able to wrap it tight for good contact.

I suppose if you can find one of grandmas "pre safety shut off" blankets that would work

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47 minutes ago, jezzupe said:

Never had any luck with these based on the modern design having auto shut off after 15 min for safety, I do like the pipe tape because you can generally control the temp with a built in thermostat and they are made to run day and night if needed, as well as being able to wrap it tight for good contact.

I suppose if you can find one of grandmas "pre safety shut off" blankets that would work

I got that good pre-ban s***.

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7 hours ago, James Leong said:

@jezzupe I got no idea what the coating is, apparently my upload of the image keeps failing

 

Your photo is probably over 2mb in size, the forum is funny about file size. You can try and PM it to me if its still not working. I think PMs are more forgiving.

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I’ve had a few experiences with awful fingerboard glue jobs. I think the worst one was a cello that had had its fingerboard and neck reglued with what appeared to be JB Weld. To get the board off I used solvents first to try to get the knife started. They didn’t do anything, but I was able to get the knife into a spot that was slightly weaker by carefully applying a lot of force. I had more success when I began using a heat gun, which I turned up to its highest setting and pointed at the top surface of the fingerboard. I wouldn’t say the glue exactly melted, but it softened just enough that I could gradually move the knife a millimeter or so at a time. Once the board was off, I removed the glue from the neck by heating it with a butane torch until I could peel it away. Although there were a couple scorch marks on the glue surface of the neck in the end, the playing surface or handle of the neck never suffered any damage to the wood or sealer/varnish. 

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On 10/8/2022 at 9:15 AM, James Leong said:

@HoGodo we use cloth on top of the neck or put the iron straight on the violin. cause steaming the neck directly will probably cause damage

I work mostly on fretted instruments and standard is just dry heat (cautious around plastic binding). Ebony conducts the heat quite well. Steam is dangerous for finishes and also would swell wood. Most modern glues will soften with heat and hide glue becomes a bit more brittle which helps in board removal. Standard Titebond releases really cleanly this way and only somewhat sticky goo remains on the surface to clean.

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