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Tintura veneziana


H.R.Fisher
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I'm the manufacturer of Dr. JG McIntosh's Tintura Veneziana, so full disclosure on that. As I've mentioned other places on the forum, it was developed as a way to achieve the results of the famed Roubo primer, also known as "horse sauce", but without the dung and urine.

There are quite a number of people using it, so I hope some will chime in here. 

Here's a post from my Instagram, showing cello specialist Kile Hill of Oregon using it:

https://www.instagram.com/p/CYcgGoUPo9S/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=

 

Lots of other posts on that Instagram page that I hope will be of help to anyone considering trying the Tintura or my other products.

Thanks for your interest!

J

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23 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I'm the manufacturer of Dr. JG McIntosh's Tintura Veneziana, so full disclosure on that. As I've mentioned other places on the forum, it was developed as a way to achieve the results of the famed Roubo primer, also known as "horse sauce", but without the dung and urine.

 

So you manufacture horse shit, or have I misunderstood?

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4 minutes ago, charliemaine said:

Does the product contain any oxidizing agents? The Roubo recipe is basically saltpeter with some organic coloring. That cello top looks very nice.

The results of the Roubo method create a dizzyingly complex chemical soup, which as you note includes nitrites and nitrates. So while nitrogen salt oxidation is the lions share of how Roubo primer works, it's not the only thing going on. The Tintura is just a lab made version of the same thing.

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1 minute ago, David Burgess said:

Who is Dr. JG McIntosh, and does he actually have a Doctor's degree, or is he guilty of "title misappropriation"? :P

JG McIntosh was a British chemist known mostly for his three volume work on oils and varnishes, and since his books were so helpful to me in learning how to make good, stable rosinate varnishes, I named the company after him out of respect. 

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OK. So it would it be appropriate to insert a label in my violins reading,  "Master Hans Weisshaar"?
I also received a lot of information and personal encouragement from Charles Beare. And a lot of inspiration from the instruments of Stradivari. So instead of using my real name, maybe the label should read...

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David, you have my phone number. If you have advice or criticism, I invite you again to call me and I'd be happy to listen. 

My name is also on the wood finishing product labels - if you actually cared about this and weren't just badgering me for your own amusement, you could have learned that with a Google search. It has always been common to name a business after someone who inspired it - Tesla is a very visible example today. Perhaps you can call Elon and let him know that you insist he rebrand his cars "Musk". 

Seriously, give me a call. You can let me have it one to one, since it's important to you. But if you're more interested in the thrill of being seen, then by all means carry on. 

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2 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

The results of the Roubo method create a dizzyingly complex chemical soup, which as you note includes nitrites and nitrates. So while nitrogen salt oxidation is the lions share of how Roubo primer works, it's not the only thing going on. The Tintura is just a lab made version of the same thing.

So that sounds like a yes to nitrates/nitrites or some other oxidizer in the product...Thanks for the disclosure.

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On 9/20/2022 at 4:10 PM, Advocatus Diaboli said:

My two cents is that on bare, untanned wood it’s kind of disappointing, but on something that’s been tanned for a little while it does some really nice, ’interesting things. 

Basically the same case with just saltpeter. You have to tan it for a while before it does anything nice. 

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24 minutes ago, Advocatus Diaboli said:

Exactly.  I haven’t found pure saltpeter to be very complex when I’ve played with it before, though.

It's not bad. But on its own it's not very spectacular. But most other chemical treatments I find make the wood too "hot" looking as a base color. And if not hot they end up green-grey, like with ammonia or dichromate, which I don't condone. 

Finding something to give the perfect not-too-hot-not-too-cool look within a reasonable amount of time, that also adds to the look of the wood, seems to be the quest. 

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