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(ID not from Ebay) Rafael Piskorsch (?)


Spongebob
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Rafael Piskorsch, violin maker in Místek (northern Moravia), died 1880.
I have physically seen one violin from him. German work, distinctive, somewhat fuller arching.
One of his violins is also in the Silesian Museum in Opava (https://www.esbirky.cz/predmet/7410538).

So much can be said about the picture of the label. What kind of violin you have is another matter, of course.

 

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49 minutes ago, palousian said:

You've been here long enough to know that labels are mostly worthless, and if you want to know what something actually is, you need to post photos.  Let me guess though... dutzendarbeit, c.1900.

I have not written anywhere that this is the original ...
do not be mean...

By the way ... you're right

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35 minutes ago, Fotios said:

Rafael Piskorsch, violin maker in Místek (northern Moravia), died 1880.
I have physically seen one violin from him. German work, distinctive, somewhat fuller arching.
One of his violins is also in the Silesian Museum in Opava (https://www.esbirky.cz/predmet/7410538).

So much can be said about the picture of the label. What kind of violin you have is another matter, of course.

 

here you go :)
 

1.jpg

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  • Spongebob changed the title to (ID not from Ebay) Rafael Piskorsch (?)

You might try taking a shortcut on this process based on long experience of such posts by others on this site.

Take a pile of slips of paper. Write "German garbage" on each slip. Put slips in a bag. Everytime you have a violin to post for an ID, just quietly ask yourself what the violin is and then take a slip out of the bag. 999 out of 1000 times the slip will be right.

The other 1/1000 time the answer the answer is usually "no idea at all", so maybe throw in one slip saying that into the bag also.

All possibilities are then covered; no "ID?" posts required.

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3 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

You might try taking a shortcut on this process based on long experience of such posts by others on this site.

Take a pile of slips of paper. Write "German garbage" on each slip. Put slips in a bag. Everytime you have a violin to post for an ID, just quietly ask yourself what the violin is and then take a slip out of the bag. 999 out of 1000 times the slip will be right.

The other 1/1000 time the answer the answer is usually "no idea at all", so maybe throw in one slip saying that into the bag also.

All possibilities are then covered; no "ID?" posts required.

OK :)

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You’ve posted a ton of ID requests of violins I’m guessing you got for cheap under the guise of “knowing” they’re cheap.  But Is the unspoken hope that you’ll stumble into a $50 instrument that turns out to be the next attic treasure worth real money?  Because that’s the vibe I get reading all of these.

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7 hours ago, outofnames said:

You’ve posted a ton of ID requests of violins I’m guessing you got for cheap under the guise of “knowing” they’re cheap.  But Is the unspoken hope that you’ll stumble into a $50 instrument that turns out to be the next attic treasure worth real money?  Because that’s the vibe I get reading all of these.

I didn't know this creator, hence this post ...
I do not send inquiries like whether this violin is a real Amati or Maggini ...
I just didn't think 'everyone' was on a false label, even those who only made a few violins because they spent the rest of their time restoring antiques.
Now I know.

It is quite difficult to imagine that in times when the flow of information was VERY restricted (compared to modern times).
Is it strange that for a novice, it is illogical to think that a 'false label' with the name, even now, of a little-known violin maker, e.g. from the south of modern Hungary, was sold in northern Germany or England 
Yes, I know, it was just done. But what a berliner middle-class Helga in the nineteenth century knew about the existence of one violin maker or another. In addition, she would have to recognize that this is his true work.
There is one conclusion ... the buyer in those days is a herd of rams.
My previous thinking was too lenient for buyers.

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