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Help identifying a German violin


vickiq
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Thank you Vickiq, I appreciate your reply

...and my apologies - no intention to be rude, as it was an honest question

Often we get posts listing a price and asking if such was a reasonable price to pay!

I, however, beg to disagree with GeorgeH because sound does affect the pricing, all things being equal

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I will disagree with you.
Being such a subjective, and hard to define quality, the sound isn’t much of a factor, if at all. Despite when buying something, that it’s the primary thing we look for.
Most pricing seems to go on maker, country, condition, and to an extent age/provenance.

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Sound is not a factor for valuation of anything historic, or anything more expensive. However in the lower price catechories, it is certainly an important factor. When I help a pupil buy an instrument, in the end sound is what's going to make or break the deal. And in those price catechories, there is a lot of junk, sound wise. Sound means first of all, loud enough but not ear piercing, and secondly with some character (notice I don't specify which character!). Thirdly, it has to not be too difficult to get the sound to come out (no excessive weight or excessively slow bow needed, good string response a given). If the instrument has that, then it certainly is worth more to me than a similar instrument without that, and I will easily spend 30% more for it. Those are also qualities one can agree on pretty objectively, amongst cellists, and are qualities that usually are a given in more expensive instruments.

Now if you go into what kind of character the sound should have, there you enter a very subjective realm....

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39 minutes ago, baroquecello said:

Sound is not a factor for valuation of anything historic, or anything more expensive. However in the lower price catechories, it is certainly an important factor.

Even in the world of retail violins, sound is not a factor in the price. It may certainly be a factor in the selection of a particular violin by a particular customer (e.g. between 2 identical Jay Haides, using WB's example), but it won't be a factor in the wholesale price paid or the price the dealer charges.

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When a player wants to "upgrade" their violin they're unlikely to try out (or be encouraged by their dealer to try out) cheaper as well as more expensive ones. This may be a mistake; the last time I went through the process I spent a goodly sum of money but left a moderate amount to risk at auction sales. This gave me a stable of four, and in the end I decided I preferred a much cheaper violin than the one I was "upgrading". 

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13 hours ago, reg said:

Thank you Vickiq, I appreciate your reply

...and my apologies - no intention to be rude, as it was an honest question

Often we get posts listing a price and asking if such was a reasonable price to pay!

I, however, beg to disagree with GeorgeH because sound does affect the pricing, all things being equal

That's fine with me reg, don't worry about the question. Different people have different points of view on the pricing. With my very recent violin hunting experience, I found that the pricing is also affected by supply and demand. I mean the timing, just like the housing market. At the moment, all the music activities have been restarted after two years of lockdown. I had a feeling that everyone is upgrading the instrument at the moment as the violin stock at all our local string shops are extremely low, especially the antique violins. So I think the pricing for old violins currently in my area would be a lot higher. But again, all my thoughts were based on my limited experience.

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21 hours ago, baroquecello said:

n the end sound is what's going to make or break the deal.

Thank you Baroquecello - I agree fully with your comments, and as I am the one assessing the price point I always keep the teacher- element in mind. Case in point I have on my desk a 'Caussin-school' violin, which despite everything my Luthier has tried, is just duff!

It should ideally sell as an advanced student violin but I could not honestly pitch it at that price - I have heard some Stentor II's that project better.

Some kid may be delighted with its looks, but could I really offer it knowing that it is simply not up to the job? ... and I would have an irate teacher hot on the line, thus destroying all the confidence I have built up through the years with my teacher base.

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