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Violin labelled Nicolaus Amatus fecit in Cremona 1639


Dianadelphine
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it is a copy made in Germany, probably late 18th to early-mid 20th century.  Probably patterned after a Nicola Amati instrument (b 1594 - d 1684, who is usually considered the best of the Amatis.  This German maker/shop probably made copies of several Amati Instruments, thus the hand written last 2 digits identifying the year of the Amati that was copied, they could print up one label and use it for several instruments, or they just did that to emulate old Cremona labels that often did this. 

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2 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

I agree, these violins bear no resemblance to an actual Amati. Those who claim they are copies, clearly have never seen an Amati, or probably any good violin.

Yes, there are tens of thousands of these not Amati copies with apocryphal Amati Fahrkarten. Reminds me of an anecdote I told some years ago https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/328294-emanuel-adam-homolka/&do=findComment&comment=586038

 

 

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12 hours ago, Dianadelphine said:

Hello I have a great grandfather’s violin that reads Nicolaus Amatus fecit in Cremona 1639. The last 2 digits are handwritten. Also has a made in Germany label inside. Is it an original or a copy? 

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It's an original German commercial violin. 

Trump's not the first or only one in the world to habitually lie.  And violin buyers aren't the world's only fools who stubbornly prefer an appealing lie to unappealing truth.

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20 hours ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

Sorry, it's not a copy of anything, just a random label thrown in a German trade violin

How do you know its not just a very poor copy?  My 9 year old tries to "copy" works of art all the time, they end up looking rather horrible and no resemblance to the originals, are these not "copies?" Just asking.

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1 hour ago, Dave Slight said:

Not necessarily.

Different countries had their own rules about imported goods bearing the country of origin, and at different periods. That Made in Germany is written in English, doesn’t mean it was imported to England.

1 hour ago, Dave Slight said:

The violin will be from circa 1900.

Yes, my apologies. In Britain the requirement to include 'Made in Germany' was introduced for imports following the Merchandise Marks act of 1887.

In the USA the labelling requirement of the McKinley tariff act was amended in 1914, to include the words 'made in' and the country of origin. After 1921 the country of origin also had to be written in English.

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5 hours ago, violinnewb said:

How do you know its not just a very poor copy?  My 9 year old tries to "copy" works of art all the time, they end up looking rather horrible and no resemblance to the originals, are these not "copies?" Just asking.

Because the people here know how the German violin-making cottage industry was set up. There was no (widespread) attempt to copy anything in particular - just to attach famous name labels to their products. (Which was done I believe by the traders who bought and oversaw the violin fabrication rather than the craftspeople themselves.)  A Schachtelmacher ("box maker") in 1910 Saxony had no access to a model he (presumably, he) could have copied. 

(I have a recent Romanian cello with a fake German name label claiming it's a Goffriller copy when I'm sure it's nothing of the sort - this is still going on today.) 

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On 6/24/2022 at 1:09 PM, pyrola_asarifolia said:

Because the people here know how the German violin-making cottage industry was set up. There was no (widespread) attempt to copy anything in particular - just to attach famous name labels to their products. (Which was done I believe by the traders who bought and oversaw the violin fabrication rather than the craftspeople themselves.)  A Schachtelmacher ("box maker") in 1910 Saxony had no access to a model he (presumably, he) could have copied. 

(I have a recent Romanian cello with a fake German name label claiming it's a Goffriller copy when I'm sure it's nothing of the sort - this is still going on today.) 

Meh.  I don't deal with absolutes or binary assumptions.  Even if it was common practice to slap on a label purporting a copy, unless you know of a more trustworthy source, a generalization does not make a statement necessarily true.

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1 hour ago, violinnewb said:

Meh.  I don't deal with absolutes or binary assumptions.  Even if it was common practice to slap on a label purporting a copy, unless you know of a more trustworthy source, a generalization does not make a statement necessarily true.

It has no features of an Amati and reveals no attempt to incorporate any Amatese features. It’s a very standard generic MK/Sch model.

Could we possibly agree to elevate Maestronet discussions beyond “meh” …?

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