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German bow from the 1920s


Jong999
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I recently went bow shopping and i have found a german bow that fit me perfectly (it felt like an extention of my hand) and was a delight to play especially for string crossings and techniques like sautille and spiccato could be executed effortlessly. Its sound was kinda meh compared to some fine french sticks that i have tried but it is not too bad either

However, it is an older bow from the 1920s and was from a german workshop, and costs around 2400 freedom eagles. I was just wondering if the asking price from the dealer is justified, given its age and provenance.

Can any of the experts give advice on the quality of the pernambuco and perhaps even shed some light on the particular workshop it was made in? Should there be any special care and attention given to older bows?

Attatched is the picture of the bow in question. The stamp on the bow simply reads "TOURTE". The bow happens to be 55.7g and a bit tip heavy from what the sticker says

Sorry for my ignorance, i know next to nothing about bows.

IMG-20220619-WA0003.jpg

Edited by Jong999
Typo
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What’s visible at the rather unfocused photo is frog and handle of a French/Mirecourt Abeille (Brasil) wood bow, not a German pernambuco. To tell more we would need more in  focus pictures, especially from the head, too. But it doesn’t shed a good light on the qualification of the shop if they misrepresented it, also if they are offering “Italian bows”, from where only a few historical (and maybe some contemporary) are in existence.

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, Blank face said:

What’s visible at the rather unfocused photo is frog and handle of a French/Mirecourt Abeille (Brasil) wood bow, not a German pernambuco. To tell more we would need more in  focus pictures, especially from the head, too. But it doesn’t shed a good light on the qualification of the shop if they misrepresented it, also if they are offering “Italian bows”, from where only a few historical (and maybe some contemporary) are in existence.

Thanks for your advice. This shop happens to have a large quantity of fine violins and are one of the most reputable dealers of fine bows (sartories and voirins) in this part of the world. Even the Rin collection goes to them to get their violins fixed so i never doubted their credibility. It is a pity that it may not be a german bow as they claim, as it plays very well in my opinion. I will try to negotiate with them when i return but i doubt that their claims are untrue as they have decades of experience in the violin dealing field.

Apart from that, i have also tried a number of antique bows from the H. R. Pfretzschner workshop and were quite satisfied with them, even though it didnt suit me as well. Should i still be considering getting this anonymous bow?

 

 

P.s. my mind slipped while writing the original post. I mean french bows. I had the priveledge of trying out a few sartories but the dealer didnt accept kidneys as a form of payment

Edited by Jong999
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To be a dealer in certified bows and a restorer in violins isn't the same qualification  as an identifier or appraiser.

There are always a lot of features to be considered, but at the photo you posted I see a stick with long and broad white flecks which are pointing with a very high probability to Abeille wood. The adjuster button is very thick in comparison to the stick and has a relative narrow double ring collar, a pin is visible at the lower button ring. The octogonal section of the stick is significantly longer than the winding, the "Tourte" brand is upside down. Frog mountings seem to be nickel. Putting all these features together, one can say with a very high certainity that it is a Mirecourt trade bow, and not a German which shouldn't have all these in combination.

A weight of 55 gr. isn't bad for a violin bow with a thread lapping, a metal winding would add another 4-6 gr. If the bow plays head-heavy you would usually want to install a wire lapping for a better balance, but this might depend of personal playing habits.

I'm not sure about the eagle currency you're talking about, and retail prices differ much depending of venue and location, but a 2.4 K price appears at least very high for such a bow without any certfication, and also for an anonymous German bow.

Note that this is just an opinion based on a single photo and the informations provided. I'm not sure if you have asked for permission to post this all on a public forum, especially when a name (of the shop?) is clearly visible on the sticker.

 

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Looks like one of those type from the Morizot??( i think they are from Morizot workshops ,never certain with these types of bows) workshop which have a faux mother of pearl slide made from some sort of plastic material. May be wrong though as cant seemuch of the slide in that one photo at a bad angle.

 

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