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German stainer copy value?


Musicmeister

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20220508_123824.thumb.jpg.d168b61c3e952ab394af4a7b68a8998d.jpgHi everyone, this is my first post here so go easy...if you need more info or a better picture just ask ^.^

 

I recently purchased a stainer copy from a reputable dealer, and was told my violin was from around 1913 due to the fact that it says "germany" instead of "made In germany". 

I paid decent money for it and it sounds great, but I'm worried about selling it for a decent price when I'm ready to upgrade. 

Any input is very much appreciated, pictures attached.

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4 hours ago, Musicmeister said:

I paid decent money for it and it sounds great, but I'm worried about selling it for a decent price when I'm ready to upgrade. 

One of the reasons for buying from a dealer is that they may offer a good trade-in price to promote customer loyalty.

You chose to go to a dealer, and it was probably a good decision as a good dealer specialising in strings will have ensured it is properly set up. In theory this kind of instrument can go for quite low prices in auction (at last week's Brompton's auction many lots at this kind of level remained unsold) but buying privately does not make much sense when the chance of needing to spend a lot on renovation and setup is high. If you trade in where you bought it, the dealer who sold it as fit-to-play knows that it is probably still saleable without too much work, and can give a decent trade-in price.

A propos of nothing, "Oenopontum" happens to be a place I call home.

 

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1 hour ago, John_London said:

 

A propos of nothing, "Oenopontum" happens to be a place I call home.

 

Last time I visited "Oenopontum" was for Stainer's 400th birthday, and I posted a travelogue here, which might interest you

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/343116-jacob-stainers-birthday/&do=findComment&comment=851713

 

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13 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Last time I visited "Oenopontum" was for Stainer's 400th birthday, and I posted a travelogue here, which might interest you

https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/343116-jacob-stainers-birthday/&do=findComment&comment=851713

 

I read your travelogue with interest.

12 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

"Oenopontum" would be bastard Latin for "wine bridge" I guess?:lol:

Oeno/i- = river En/Oenus/Inn . Lat. pontum, Eng. "bridge", Ger. "Brücke" (in the local dialect probably pronounced "Bruck"). So Lat. Oenopontum, Ger. Innsbruck, would mean "Inn bridge". Wikipedia says that the name of the river comes from a word for "water", so like many Etymologies it is disappointingly pedestrian.

The most central bridge in the town is called Innbrücke.

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9 hours ago, John_London said:

I read your travelogue with interest.

Oeno/i- = river En/Oenus/Inn . Lat. pontum, Eng. "bridge", Ger. "Brücke" (in the local dialect probably pronounced "Bruck"). So Lat. Oenopontum, Ger. Innsbruck, would mean "Inn bridge". Wikipedia says that the name of the river comes from a word for "water", so like many Etymologies it is disappointingly pedestrian.

The most central bridge in the town is called Innbrücke.

Just having a little fun with words, but I appreciate this. It's typically rendered as "Oenipontum", and the "oeno" prefix always makes me think of wine vis a vis "oenophile"

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Hi Musicmeister --

If you just bought the fiddle, why are you even worrying about upgrading? It takes a while to figure out what any given instrument offers. Just play it and see what happens. 

Best test of quality I know is: play some major& minor scales in 5th position and really listen to the sound of the G & D strings. If it's good you got a winner. If not -- explore setup options like bridge & soundpost. If those don't work, maybe it's time to get a better axe.

Good luck!

 

 

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11 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Just having a little fun with words, but I appreciate this. It's typically rendered as "Oenipontum", and the "oeno" prefix always makes me think of wine vis a vis "oenophile"

Whilst off the subject started by Musicmeister (since there is no sign yet that he /she /they has been back), I will observe there is an excellent entry on the etymology of "wine", Greek "oinos", etc. by Holford-Strevens in the Oxford Companion to Wine, as I recall.

The Alps, like many places, are replete with odd and ancient, pre-Germanic and pre-Roman place names. One that always amuses me is Vomp.

Absam/Absom is part of the  Martha villages, some of which also have odd names:  Mühlau, Artzl, Rum, Thaur, Hall, Absam. They are known for a radish festival (an foodstuff they grow in vast numbers), and for being one of these areas where they celebrate the Altweibermühl, a custom of ostensibly transforming men dressed as old women, through a rejuvenation process, into attractive young women. It is so screamingly politically incorrect that no English translation can be permitted.

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