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Fake violin label


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Johann Friedrich Storck, Lauten und Geigenmacher, Straßburg 1761

Johann Friedrich Storck, lute and violin maker, Strasbourg 1761 ??? Repaired Frant. Herclík, Staré Benátky (Mladá Boleslav) 1912 

I'm not sure the authenticity of the violin label - can you please comment. Thank you

Joannes Friedrich Storck 18th century violin ??? More detailed photo of a violin: https://photos.app.goo.gl/GuJdwNvrpjwFAW3f7

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35 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

The violin would appear to be a Saxon one, that was originally varnished a dark colour, that has been stripped and re-varnished. that would render the label a "Fahrkarte" (is it a photo-copy?)

Violins do not have corner blocks. In my opinion, repaired the lower block and cracks (Frant. Herclík 1912 + signature), varnish is not original. The next label looks much older. 

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5 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

2nd one, a Schöönbacher, early 18th C. I would think it beside the point if Metelka repaired it at some juncture

I was hoping the violin made in Pasek-on-Iser, Bohemia.

label:  Josef. syn Věnceslava Metelky. v Pasekách pod Krkonoši 1832 

Josef Metelka was born in 1842 and died in 1880 - in my opinion, another false label.

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4 hours ago, Zdenek - Lavuta said:

Josef Metelka was born in 1842 and died in 1880 - in my opinion, another false label.

I would agree that the label is indeed fake. There is an offset- or print-pattern visible in the left corner, as if the label was printed (raster) or a photocopy from a book was (maybe modified and) then printed with a laser printer or something else. Furthermore, these grotesque typefaces were not in wide use in the late (!) 19th century. First of them came up in the 1880s. 

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I apologize for the late response - I can't keep up (I'm married).
Fake Label: One hundred percent true - thank you. 
I opened the violin and was pleasantly surprised. I think these violins come from the German region of Vogtland.

Vogtland violin??? The makers in the Vogtland region clung to their traditional freeform construction with the neck and top-block made in one piece (the so-called ‘through-neck’) until well into the 19th century.

In my opinion beautiful work - beautiful violin corner blocks and linings.
What is the difference between Italian and German school (corner blocks)???

I devote more of my time to it - maybe it's worth it: Remove and replace the bass bar - or leave everything original?

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On 5/6/2022 at 6:01 PM, Vafan said:

I would agree that the label is indeed fake. There is an offset- or print-pattern visible in the left corner, as if the label was printed (raster) or a photocopy from a book was (maybe modified and) then printed with a laser printer or something else. Furthermore, these grotesque typefaces were not in wide use in the late (!) 19th century. First of them came up in the 1880s. 

Raster.jpg

Fake Label: One hundred percent true - thank you.

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2 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

You should never take the back off when the top is what needs the repairs

The back side has been removed (allowed with 50 percent + upper block allowed). The first step is to clean the violin and check (front plate of the violin). No standard procedure - but it was necessary to do so. I would love to hear your opinion on these violins. Thank you.

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20 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

I wonder why the linings are let into the blocks - strange

I see nothing wrong with taking backs off, although I can't see the necessity here 

sorry i don't understand the question? (I see nothing wrong with taking backs off, although I can't see the necessity here )

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jacobsaunders Your opinion? Is it worth investing free time? 

German region of Vogtland Violin - is rightly located (if not Italian) :-)

In my opinion, violins from the early 19th century - perhaps older: 1) violins need to be repaired 2) sound - I believe it will be fantastic. Old versus new violin? Grapes or wine? It always depends on the quality. I'm still learning (violins) - if you want to build a house and ask how, I'll help (I'm a bricklayer). If you ask a professional, he is silent. It's not personal - it just seems that way to me.

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49 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

 

I wonder why the linings are let into the blocks - strange

 

I would strongly assume that both blocks and mortised linings are the work of a later repairer., who took off the back. Otherwise it’s unlikely that corner blocks at a bob construction could have such a flat surface downside.

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5 minutes ago, Zdenek - Lavuta said:

jacobsaunders Your opinion? Is it worth investing free time? 

German region of Vogtland Violin - is rightly located (if not Italian) :-)

In my opinion, violins from the early 19th century - perhaps older: 1) violins need to be repaired 2) sound - I believe it will be fantastic. Old versus new violin? Grapes or wine? It always depends on the quality. I'm still learning (violins) - if you want to build a house and ask how, I'll help (I'm a bricklayer). If you ask a professional, he is silent. It's not personal - it just seems that way to me.

I certainly invest my “free time” mending violins, if that is any help

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15 minutes ago, Blank face said:

I would strongly assume that both blocks and mortised linings are the work of a later repairer., who took off the back. Otherwise it’s unlikely that corner blocks at a bob construction could have such a flat surface downside.

Do you think the corner blocks (top, bottom block) were allocated later?

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31 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

I certainly invest my “free time” mending violins, if that is any help

I try the same, I'm looking for information, etc. (only in my free time). I'm sorry: Maestronet (all about the violin) + so much expert opinion and information about the violin. The question (violin identification) is a problem? Just write in the fireplace or it's worth fixing. Simply short. I don't want to touch anyone - just my observation.

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My personal recommendation, unless you are going to keep it to practice restoration techniques, is to use simple, unadorned, good quality fittings and glue it back together as a playing instrument. The ivory(?) lower saddle may cause a problem if you try to sell it internationally, but it seems to be original, in which case you would need a carnet from... well, whoever's in charge of CITES now.

This will not be a million dollar instrument. But if it can be put under someone's chin (on someone's arm? Against someone's chest?) it is worth more than firewood.

 

 

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29 minutes ago, Rothwein said:

My personal recommendation, unless you are going to keep it to practice restoration techniques, is to use simple, unadorned, good quality fittings and glue it back together as a playing instrument. The ivory(?) lower saddle may cause a problem if you try to sell it internationally, but it seems to be original, in which case you would need a carnet from... well, whoever's in charge of CITES now.

This will not be a million dollar instrument. But if it can be put under someone's chin (on someone's arm? Against someone's chest?) it is worth more than firewood.

 

 

I would like to know the origin of the violin (sell, keep, repair - not important). I think these violins come from the German region of Vogtland until well into the 19th century. 
In my opinion beautiful work - beautiful corner blocks and linings, violin head scroll etc. Thank you for your opinion (advice) - I will not question again and I didn't want to bother.

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3 hours ago, Rothwein said:

Okay, I understand. I'm still not clear on the difference between Vogtland and Egerland, etc. so I'll follow with curiosity piqued.

Vogtland is the Saxon (northern) part of the area, and Egerland the Bohemian (southern) half

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