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Bridge setup query


George2020
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Hi there,

I'm looking at purchasing this violin.

However, the bridge setup looks unusual (there appears to large gaps and irregularities on the base of the bridge where it meets the body - please see attached images).

My question is, while not a  perfect fit is this acceptable?  And, more importantly, will this affect the sound given that the base of the bridge is not flush with the body of the violin?

Thank you

Cheers

George

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IMG_20220413_100319320.jpg

IMG_20220413_101216779.jpg

Edited by George2020
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This looks like cut with a teaspoon or the like. 
In each case the misfits will damage the varnish and probably the wood, too. Very small gaps can be tolerated sometimes, but these are dreadful, can cause buzzing and shed a bad light on the skills of the person making the setup.

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Thank you for the comments so far.  It is a new but antiqued violin.  On other violins we have had the bridge sits clearly on top of the oiled violin (not varnished) and they have had no gaps.  Your comments are really appreciated.

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So it’s a sort of picture puzzle, hard to tell from a phone screen. In each case something what needs to be fixed.

Agree that feet and knuckles don’t look like they should at a good bridge. Is it a new trade instrument?

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55 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

Evidently everyones looking at pictures on their phone, on a computer screen the fit looks absolutely terrible and its the fit, not varnish

Or maybe not, since I viewed the photos on a 23 inch screen, and further magnified the images to provide as much detail as the image quality would allow, prior to responding. ;)

I also have quite a bit of experience with soft varnish oozing out from under the bridge feet, particularly in front of the feet, since the feet tend to slide forward on a soft varnish, producing a varnish "berm".

Not insisting that I'm right, but I'd be willing to wager a hundred bucks on it. :)

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5 hours ago, George2020 said:

the base of the bridge is not flush with the body of the violin…

The base of the bridge is not supposed to be flush with the body of the violin.  The feet of the bridge should fit the top with no gaps.  On my screen I see gaps.

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Carefully examining around the bridge feet edges in Photoshop, it looks to me that what appears to be a varnish berm is actually a dark reflection produced by the shininess of the top varnish reflecting the uneven edge of the feet produced by chipping during cutting.  The uneven foot edge, and the reflection lower edge, are perfectly symmetrical with each other, which doesn't happen with squeezed varnish.  So I feel that there's a fitting problem, not soft varnish.  :)

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Violadamore, if you look at the second image, there is a lip of varnish visible in the upper bass corner.  The angle of the camera is low, so the reflection of the varnish berm in the plate starts to look the same size as the berm in front of the bridge. If the camera were higher it would look smaller and less symmetrical. :)

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First, enlarging to the Nth, there is clear evidence of unevenness at the base of the bridge.  However, it we can see the material immediately behind going down to where the reflection indicates "varnish level", so this is certainly not the whole story.  Indeed, although it is untidy I would not necessarily consider it significant.    Enlarging the middle picture tells a very different story:  looking at the closer foot of the bridge, and following the line of the interface to the end, we see that the foot of the bridge suddenly appears lower.  As it would be physically impossible for all the force to be taken at the inner edge of the foot I think we have to conclude that what we are looking at is squidged-out material - probably varnish. 
This means that the even thickness of the reflected line speaks to a very well-fitted bridge, at least in this region.  
The issue at the outside suggests that the fit was achieved using something rather course initally - maybe some type of abbrasive coated cloth.  The relatively even squidge suggests this was tidied up afterwards using a finer grit - but the edge would have been effectively unrecoverable.  
Naturally Stephen H and David B would be better positioned than I to comment on the technical issues of starting with too course a grit...

PS  Some really nice work on the Instagram fiddle, Stephen.  I'd be interested to know how it sounds - though the quality of the joint along the middle of the table could potentially prove critical here.

PPS  It appears that the missing material from initial working is only at the ends of the feet, and the extent is minimal.  To my eye this is a really well fitted bridge, with the strings tightened before the varnish had hardened sufficiently.

Edited by giorgy
PPS added, and typo correction
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14 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Carefully examining around the bridge feet edges in Photoshop, it looks to me that what appears to be a varnish berm is actually a dark reflection produced by the shininess of the top varnish reflecting the uneven edge of the feet produced by chipping during cutting. 

OK, but I just had new six-thousand-dollar lenses installed in my eyes, while you probably still have cataracts. ;)

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I've tried a few times for my blog to photograph feet that fit really well to show what it looks like. You won't find that on by blog because I haven't been able to do it yet--tiny bits of varnish, reflections, etc, always make it look terrible, even if the fit is as good as the center joint in a top. Try it. This is definitely a wall of varnish in the OP's pix. Try intentionally to cut a bridge that fits just like that. I bet you can't.

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I really appreciate the feedback.  The violin is new and is a replica. It is very antiqued and, I understand, varnished using traditional methods.  It is priced as an advanced student violin around $5000 USD.  It's handmade in a workshop.  Very happy with the instrument just wondering about the set up. The strings are not perfectly centred on the neck too.   I've added some higher res pics of the bridge. Thank you all.

IMG_20220413_100259723.jpg

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