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David Rosales
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6 hours ago, MikeC said:

Too hard to narrow down to just three tools so maybe a few general categories.  Hand saws, gouges, planes, drill, vise / plate hoder. Most important of all is the optivisor since I can't see worth a darn without it! :D

Like Mike, I too am helpless without my glasses but I wouldn't consider them as being my favourite.

These three tools are among my many favourites and I use them often. I have had them a long time, they were inexpensive but I just like them a lot.

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My old small hammer, marking guage and an old rusty scriber. The old scriber has a clip in the modelled on a leg complete with high heeled shoe and garter, I presume it is Victorian?

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Other tools I have, I rarely or never use, but again, I just like them. Here are some planes. The small yellow one I made myself, modelled on old Dutch planes, does come in handy at times, despite the poorly hardened iron. The wooden jack plane it sits on, I rarely use now but it was the first wooden plane I bought so is special to me. The iron plane is a Spiers smoothing plane and I rarely use it as I mostly prefer wooden planes or a Stanley No 3 if I do use a metal plane. It has beautiful rosewood 'infils' which I enjoy looking at, turning the plane in the light so I can look 'into' the wood, I feel I am glimpsing into the mysterious forest where it grew. (I plan to make some guitars again soon so it will be back in use for smoothing the backs and sides?) The old paint splattered worn smoothing plane at the front I recently got off ebay. It is split on one side and has a badly installed steel plate screwed onto the front of its sole. It has had a hard life, the person I got it off said it came from a boatyard in Whitby. I don't think it is very old but has been used roughly. I like its paint spots and worn appearance and it has come to me to enjoy a well earned retirement and this old workhorse has now gone out to grass in my tool sanctuary!

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Its nice to have nice tools but I now need to get motivated and get out of bed in the morning and use my tools to make some things before I too am put out to grass alongside my old boatyard plane!

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11 hours ago, charliemaine said:

Yes it's commercial varnish. Nunzios' madder rosinate varnish. Here it is with a couple more coats. On top of this I would ad 1-2 coats of either amber or copal varnish and call it good.

https://www.violinvarnishitaly.com/

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That looks very nice.  I bought a selection of his products a short while ago when I read that he was trying to sell his business and am just about to start trials.  He posted quite a lot of photos a few years back.

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7 hours ago, JoeDeF said:

It’d be really hard to choose, but the one thing I’m pretty certain of is that the the older I get, the higher up the list go the magnifiers, light sources, and other visual aids. 

I've found that cool-ish led lighting makes it easier to see the grain in the wood.

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10 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

What is meant by "grain" in this case? Figure? Growth rings? Something else?

What difference does it make really? Typically speaking , wood “ grain “refers but is not limited to all the above. Medullary rays and cell walls could easily be included. From a linguistics point of view a grain is any of the smallest parts of something, a grain of rice , a grain of salt … grains of crystals and a grain of common sense. 

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13 minutes ago, James M. Jones said:

What difference does it make really? Typically speaking , wood “ grain “refers but is not limited to all the above. Medullary rays and cell walls could easily be included. From a linguistics point of view a grain is any of the smallest parts of something, a grain of rice , a grain of salt … grains of crystals and a grain of common sense. 

I think it's helpful to use specific and clear language, where it exists, to minimize the possibility of misunderstanding. When discussing technical matters, it's valuable to be specific because it saves the time that might be wasted seeking clarification. Precisely because of the huge number of wood characteristics you listed, why should we use a catchall term when we can call them what they are?

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From my point of view as a non-English speaker (so it doesn't have much value:lol:), I refer with "grain" to the longitudinal lines corresponding to the growth rings, with fiber to indicate the direction of the split, then flames, medullary rays and so on.
I am wrong?

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2 minutes ago, Davide Sora said:

From my point of view as a non-English speaker (so it doesn't have much value:lol:), I refer with "grain" to the longitudinal lines corresponding to the growth rings, with fiber to indicate the direction of the split, then flames, medullary rays and so on.
I am wrong?

You are, to my mind, correct. I appreciate the clarity and specificity of your posts. They leave little room for misunderstanding.

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2 minutes ago, Davide Sora said:

From my point of view as a non-English speaker (so it doesn't have much value:lol:), I refer with "grain" to the longitudinal lines corresponding to the growth rings, with fiber to indicate the direction of the split, then flames, medullary rays and so on.
I am wrong?

From a native English speaking POV you are correct… however also incomplete… we ma refer to the wild grain of a burl … without being wrong … or we may also consider end grain … 

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3 minutes ago, James M. Jones said:

From a native English speaking POV you are correct… however also incomplete… we ma refer to the wild grain of a burl … without being wrong … or we may also consider end grain … 

By qualifying the word grain with an adjective, as in wild or end, you make the term specific and therefore useful. In the case of a burl, the wildness of the fibers is the rasion de etre of the burl itself. This is very descriptive and self evident. The end grain likewise, because it describes the arrangement and behavior of the wood fiber at a specific place. 

Grain in wood is, using your good example of being the smallest visible constituent of a thing, most equatable with fiber. 

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13 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I think it's helpful to use specific and clear language, where it exists, to minimize the possibility of misunderstanding. When discussing technical matters, it's valuable to be specific because it saves the time that might be wasted seeking clarification. Precisely because of the huge number of wood characteristics you listed, why should we use a catchall term when we can call them what they are?

I like clear language as well … but at some point we need to practice a certain Amount  of inference in any discussion including a “ “ “ we”  For instance what is coolish light …. Maybe question specific what nanometers in what percentage?  ? I’m sure Jim Bress being a scientist or better yet Mike Molnar with his background in high energy electromagnetic wave leangth forms between infrared and ultraviolet…more get be able to address what coolish means ? I think of it as a blue tone … what do I mean by that?to infinity and beyond… … at some point . Catch all phrases serve a purpose at points. Sort of related to the craftsmen vs machine arguments… Personally I still wonder … specifically …what your  “synthetic Rubio “is … a simple solution  potassium nitrate and dihydrous monoxide?  … 

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1 minute ago, James M. Jones said:

I like clear language as well … but at some point we need to practice a certain Amount  of inference in any discussion including a “ “ “ we”  For instance what is coolish light …. Maybe question specific what nanometers in what percentage?  ? I’m sure Jim Bress being a scientist or better yet Mike Molnar with his background in high energy electromagnetic wave leangth forms between infrared and ultraviolet…more get be able to address what coolish means ? I think of it as a blue tone … what do I mean by that?to infinity and beyond… … at some point . Catch all phrases serve a purpose at points. Sort of related to the craftsmen vs machine arguments… Personally I still wonder … specifically …what your  “synthetic Rubio “is … a simple solution  potassium nitrate and dihydrous monoxide?  … 

I take your point, but the major difference between your light temperature idea and this matter of grain is that one is a subjective phenomenon and the other is objective. We are forced to use generalizations to describe some things that rely on the senses, but have adequate vocabulary to discuss things like anatomical phenomena. 

As for the synthetic Roubo, trade secrets are an entirely different matter, and I hope you'll forgive me if I'm not willing to reveal the makeup of something I sell. There is no potassium nitrate in it, however. If you imagine taking a chemical analysis of fermented horse waste and then making an aqueous solution that includes the same active ingredients, you have your answer. 

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1 minute ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I take your point, but the major difference between your light temperature idea and this matter of grain is that one is a subjective phenomenon and the other is objective. We are forced to use generalizations to describe some things that rely on the senses, but have adequate vocabulary to discuss things like anatomical phenomena. 

As for the synthetic Roubo, trade secrets are an entirely different matter, and I hope you'll forgive me if I'm not willing to reveal the makeup of something I sell. There is no potassium nitrate in it, however. If you imagine taking a chemical analysis of fermented horse waste and then making an aqueous solution that includes the same active ingredients, you have your answer. 

Thank you , half is just a reality check … the other half … well , it’s like picking nits … I do strongly agree that you are  absolutely correct .. as they say ,”the devil is in. The Details”.  

on the other hand …. 

as a consummate craftsman once said to me ,” the difference between a ‘professional ‘and an ‘ amateur’ is the ‘ professional’ know when to quit…( here, I am tipping my hand lol) 
Language is itself is a subjective, IMO , and varying over time, place and culture. 
  Are our ideas of subjective naming types of light , cool , warm ect … is there really that much different from terms like Grain in reference to wood structure? I don’t need to preface grain with “wild “or end” or cross “ or against…to get the point across,  for vernacular or common  understanding… do I ? 
as for the Rubio, maybe you will shared, did you include nano carbon in your version?  Lol 
I do understand not revealing trade secrets, I expect some percentage of Potassium Nitrate from my …. Or specificity … Rubio’s…. organic recipe… the bed/ filter  is made of wheat straw .the manure from my horse should contribute potassium as well. 
 

Im sure my high school English teacher would issue a low mark for these comments. Lol 

 

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14 hours ago, Muswell said:

That looks very nice.  I bought a selection of his products a short while ago when I read that he was trying to sell his business and am just about to start trials.  He posted quite a lot of photos a few years back.

His varnishes are very nice. Be aware his varnishes dry very fast with little open time, which to me is a good thing, it equals less dust nits. But you have to work quickly if padding the varnish.  I find brushing on a coat quickly and then evenly padding out before the varnish tacks up too much works well.  Overall a very fine varnish maker, sorry to see him exit.

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5 hours ago, James M. Jones said:

I like clear language as well … but at some point we need to practice a certain Amount  of inference in any discussion including a “ “ “ we”  For instance what is coolish light …. Maybe question specific what nanometers in what percentage?  ? I’m sure Jim Bress being a scientist or better yet Mike Molnar with his background in high energy electromagnetic wave leangth forms between infrared and ultraviolet…more get be able to address what coolish means ? I think of it as a blue tone … what do I mean by that?to infinity and beyond… … at some point . Catch all phrases serve a purpose at points. Sort of related to the craftsmen vs machine arguments… Personally I still wonder … specifically …what your  “synthetic Rubio “is … a simple solution  potassium nitrate and dihydrous monoxide?  … 

I think your pony tail looks cool. However, I've never observed any blue hues in it. Maybe you need to increase your copper intake to become more cool. Have you been able to adjust your Roubo temperature by varying Red's diet?

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8 minutes ago, Jim Bress said:

I think your pony tail looks cool. However, I've never observed any blue hues in it. Maybe you need to increase your copper intake to become more cool. Have you been able to adjust your Roubo temperature by varying Red's diet?

Lol … my bear hug . Mind if I tell that story ? 

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1 minute ago, Jim Bress said:

Let your conscious be your guide. ;)

Lol … your one of my favorite “tools “ so … lol . We seem to have run out this thread … I had the pleasure to 
Meet Jim a few yrs back while attending a violin making class with Joe Thrift , hosted by mason violins down in fredricksburg …? North Virginia?south ? East ?  Lol , and it was like this weird meeting of the minds . Of sorts , instant connection, Jim’s a great guy … salt of the earth as they say … we share a lot in common …and almost nothing at all . We Rather come from two very different backgrounds,, over the course of time  I developed a deep respect for Jim , his work and person . I’m a hippie child and have worked in the forest and arts and craft and Jim led a very much different life , but our ability to look at things deeply led to this feeling of connection….. right,  so now

Jim is this bear of a man , he’s huge , not huge like fat huge ,

but huge like muscle and bone … tall … his eyes have a piercing qualities that would suck the evil out of the devil and his hands are MASSIVE.   I’m a little slip of a guy , 5’9 in heals and 150 lbs wringing wet in a suit and tie …( been there) …. So there’s this contrast, if you will…so now , after a few beers and the company is great  … I’m feeling great … lol..  and walk into the shop and up to Jim … gonna go to give him this bear hug and bam ! He’s got me in some kinda mma head lock ,  I’m flapping around like a rag doll ! Never hurt me ,thank god almighty… so full of control and grace .lol  And funny as all get out! Couldn’t have written it better! Hope your well brother bear . 
on a more serious note , 
Id offer that the relatively of this story is that violin making at its core is a social endeavor, we don’t plant violin seeds , your best tools , favorite tools , are going to be your teachers , your customers, your contemporary . Getting to things like VSA and other related learning events will move a personal forward much faster than anything. 

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51 minutes ago, James M. Jones said:

Yea buddy,

its Chaga…. I hear tell ,it’s an ancient cure all ,, a mushroom that grows from on birch . Taste like dirt. 
Id like to host a violin making workshop up here someday, your always welcome . Just gotta brave the cold!

I think I still remember how. :) 

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9 hours ago, charliemaine said:

His varnishes are very nice. Be aware his varnishes dry very fast with little open time, which to me is a good thing, it equals less dust nits. But you have to work quickly if padding the varnish.  I find brushing on a coat quickly and then evenly padding out before the varnish tacks up too much works well.  Overall a very fine varnish maker, sorry to see him exit.

Thanks for the advice. I was very impressed by the photos he posted and it was the news that he was selling up that spurred me into action.

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