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Rubio Soup


Berl Mendenhall

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Never heard of "Rubio Soup". But a quick google search under "Rubio Soup+Kremer did turn up this: :lol:

(I have deleted the link I originally posted,  since it did not originally show photos of nude women, but I now understand that the page changes every few minutes. I will request that others delete the link from their quotes and replies as well.)

 

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59 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Never heard of "Rubio Soup". But a quick google search under "Rubio Soup+Kremer did turn up this: :lol:

(I have deleted the link I originally posted,  since it did not originally show photos of nude women, but I now understand that the page changes every few minutes. I will request that others delete the link from their quotes and relies as well.)

 

That's like saying please don't press the big shiny red button!

I went to Kremer and couldn't find Rubio-soup, but did find Rubio mineral ground which looks like it may be the same ingredients.

https://shop.kremerpigments.com/elements/resources/products/files/79725MSDS.pdf 

Berl,

For a mineral ground I use this mixed with colophony varnish.

https://shop.kremerpigments.com/us/shop/pigments/11810-selenite-marienglas-fine.html

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19 minutes ago, gowan said:

Years ago there was a well regarded British luthier, David Rubio, who was well known for making red lake varnish.  Could Rubio soup somehow be connected to that maker?

 

Definitely a true luthier. He made harpsichords and very fine classical guitars as well as violins.

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It's a mineral ground that David Rubio used: David Rubio (rubioviolins.com) The link, safe and non-morphing, gives instructions for surface prep and the formula and application instructions for this mineral ground.

 

He died a couple of decades ago, and a google search shows a number of MN threads about this very subject before 2010.

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1 hour ago, Jim Bress said:

That's like saying please don't press the big shiny red button!

I went to Kremer and couldn't find Rubio-soup, but did find Rubio mineral ground which looks like it may be the same ingredients.

https://shop.kremerpigments.com/elements/resources/products/files/79725MSDS.pdf 

Berl,

For a mineral ground I use this mixed with colophony varnish.

https://shop.kremerpigments.com/us/shop/pigments/11810-selenite-marienglas-fine.html

My reason for asking is, I nearly through the stuff in the trash. I’d be happy to give it to someone that uses the stuff. I bought it years ago thinking I might try it. It seems to me he used it with water glass and the different grades of rosin oil. That may be right or wrong, it’s been many years. Bottom line, if anyone can use it, it’s yours. Kremer wants thirty five dollars for a jar like this. You pay shipping.

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The Recipe

So, the recipe, (parts per 100)...based approximately on Barlow Spectra 18 of sample 21 Goffriller ‘cello.
Magnesium 3.6, Aluminium 10.0 Silicon, 11.6 Phosphorus 2.4, Sulphur 6.9, Chlorine 6.07, Potassium 5.2 , Calcium 42.3, Manganese 0.3, Iron 10.6, Sodium l.3.
In my attempt to produce a slurry containing these elements in roughtly these proportions, I mixed 45 gms of Calcium Lactate with l0 gms. Alum, 3 gms. Manganese Sulphate, 3 gms. Titanium Dioxide, 5 gms Yellow Iron Oxide 10gms Mica Powder with ordinary tap water (containing Chlorine) to make a thin suspension. Separately I prepared a 50% solution of Potasium Silicate.

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2 minutes ago, duane88 said:

The Recipe

So, the recipe, (parts per 100)...based approximately on Barlow Spectra 18 of sample 21 Goffriller ‘cello.
Magnesium 3.6, Aluminium 10.0 Silicon, 11.6 Phosphorus 2.4, Sulphur 6.9, Chlorine 6.07, Potassium 5.2 , Calcium 42.3, Manganese 0.3, Iron 10.6, Sodium l.3.
In my attempt to produce a slurry containing these elements in roughtly these proportions, I mixed 45 gms of Calcium Lactate with l0 gms. Alum, 3 gms. Manganese Sulphate, 3 gms. Titanium Dioxide, 5 gms Yellow Iron Oxide 10gms Mica Powder with ordinary tap water (containing Chlorine) to make a thin suspension. Separately I prepared a 50% solution of Potasium Silicate.

Thanks for the explanation. I remember now why I didn’t use it. I thought there is no way the Cremonese makers used all that stuff mixed together. About this time I started using pumice. Only years later switching to Plaster Of Paris. Haven’t looked back sense.
 

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1 hour ago, JacksonMaberry said:

My finishing shelves are fit to burst, damn my hoarding tendencies. If I only kept what I actively use I could fit it all in a shoebox

I feel the same way. I’ve got at least a dozen jars of translucent iron oxide pigments. Couldn’t tell you the last time I used any of those.

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  • 9 months later...
On 3/30/2022 at 5:50 PM, duane88 said:

The Recipe

So, the recipe, (parts per 100)...based approximately on Barlow Spectra 18 of sample 21 Goffriller ‘cello.
Magnesium 3.6, Aluminium 10.0 Silicon, 11.6 Phosphorus 2.4, Sulphur 6.9, Chlorine 6.07, Potassium 5.2 , Calcium 42.3, Manganese 0.3, Iron 10.6, Sodium l.3.
In my attempt to produce a slurry containing these elements in roughtly these proportions, I mixed 45 gms of Calcium Lactate with l0 gms. Alum, 3 gms. Manganese Sulphate, 3 gms. Titanium Dioxide, 5 gms Yellow Iron Oxide 10gms Mica Powder with ordinary tap water (containing Chlorine) to make a thin suspension. Separately I prepared a 50% solution of Potasium Silicate.

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David Rubio was a very thoughtful and original maker. His varnish varies quite a lot and was constantly evolving according to the information that became available to him. This certainly involved some more or less successful processes. Personally, I very much appreciate that he never indulged in "antiquing". I have a cello made by him in 1980 that has served me well for more than 40 years  since it was made and I remember with great pleasure the conversations I had associated with the making of the instrument.

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