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Temp and uv curing box


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1 hour ago, saintjohnbarleycorn said:

I have my curing box in a space that will go down to about 20 f tonight is that ok or should I move it to a warmer room

My shop is that way too.  I don't find it significant.  Actually some varnishes like the cold...especially cold sun.

Joe

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As temperature goes down the RH will increase, but you still need to measure to know what your RH is. If the room is already a bit dry then the warmer environment in the UV box might make for a too dry environment. Or maybe your space is a bit damp, then the UV box will be moving the RH in the right direction. You won’t know until you test. 

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I wouldn't say temperature is insignificant, though it's not the primary driver in curing drying oil-bearing films. That would be polymerization, driven by oxidation. The humidity concern has more to do with the health of the wooden instrument and it's glue joints, rather than the curing of the oil.

From page 264 of Livache/McIntosh.

IMG20220205193041~2.jpg

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On 2/6/2022 at 5:36 AM, joerobson said:

My shop is that way too.  I don't find it significant.  Actually some varnishes like the cold...especially cold sun.

Joe

What about humidity?

Isn’t it that some varnishes solidify better in humid conditions? Or if you were to make a Venetian copy you need high humidity for the typical cracquelure?

(I’d be curious to do at least once in my lifetime a violin with Japanese lacquer which must be hardened in very humid conditions.)

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On 2/6/2022 at 6:44 PM, Andreas Preuss said:

What about humidity?

Isn’t it that some varnishes solidify better in humid conditions? Or if you were to make a Venetian copy you need high humidity for the typical cracquelure?

(I’d be curious to do at least once in my lifetime a violin with Japanese lacquer which must be hardened in very humid conditions.)

Andreas,

True.  Some varnishes cure through better in humid atmospheres...slower solvent evaporation helps to avoid top down drying.

As far as cracquelure (an adhesion failure) the jury is still out on that one.

Urishi...I have read a lot but not yet tried it.

on we go

Joe

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7 hours ago, joerobson said:

As far as cracquelure (an adhesion failure) the jury is still out on that one.

I believe that craquelure is a problem of internal varnish tensions, not an adhesion problem. Unless you mean a type of craquelures that are so drastic that the paint will lift and peel off, which I personally have never seen.

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