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Davide Sora's bench


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On 10/28/2023 at 10:02 PM, Dean Markel said:

Hi Davide, 

Do you use your refractive ground in conjunction with the casein sealer or instead of? I assume it comes after as a pore filler and way to enhance the look of the wood. Thanks for sharing!

I put the casein first and then this refractive/mineral ground.
But I've also used it without casein, especially for maple. When I didn't use casein I used the 1:2 dilution ratio instead of 1:3 to limit deep penetration. I usually only do this when the density of the maple is medium/high and the wood is quite compact and with small pores, sometimes I also use it without the pumice, it's a very versatile thing.

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When the dimensions allow it, I always get two scrolls instead of just one from the same block. You just need that the maximum width extends to include the eye of the second scroll, and that on the neck side (of the second scroll) there is at least 34mm of width centered on the center line, a couple of spruce wings will restore the necessary squareness of the block if needed.

Wasting good seasoned wood would be a real crime.:)

Sprucewing.thumb.jpg.2e79e5c82d1572b6451fe337511e356e.jpgSprucewingflushwiththeeye.thumb.jpg.9ac1a20e3f5e48103508446e628b9d76.jpg

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On 11/30/2023 at 4:03 PM, MikeC said:

Hi Davide.   Who makes those rasps?  They look much better than the ones that I have.  

My rasps are handmade in Hungary, I purchased them many years ago here in Cremona at LAC (Liuteria Artistica Cremonese), today I believe they are the ones that LiuteriaShop sells: https://www.liuteriashop.com/it/attrezzatura/raspe But mine are 25mm wide and the ones I see in the catalog seem narrower to me, unfortunately they don't indicate the precise measurements. Being handmade rasps, it would always be essential to see them in person before purchasing them, because there are always slight differences in the teeth and flatness of the faces. A maker of quality handmade rasps that I would like to recommend is Pechar: http://pechar-rasps.com/en/ I don't even have one of their rasps, but I had the opportunity to try them at Mondomusica fair a few years ago and they seemed to me excellent.

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On 12/2/2023 at 2:34 AM, MikeC said:

Thanks Davide,  but there is something wrong with those links.  They take me to youtube.  

I found some other handmade rasps online,  the brand is Auriou but I don't know if they make the size needed for violin making.  

Thanks for the report, I replaced the links in my previous post and they should work now.

I'm not familiar with Auriou rasps, but they don't look bad. The problem with rasps is that until you've tried them you can't understand how they work, especially regarding the smoothness of the cutting action and how clean a surface they create.

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On 12/1/2023 at 7:34 PM, MikeC said:

Thanks Davide,  but there is something wrong with those links.  They take me to youtube.  

I found some other handmade rasps online,  the brand is Auriou but I don't know if they make the size needed for violin making.  

Mike,

Not sure where you are located, but I also searched for a while to find rasps like I see many of the European luthiers using.  I finally found some distributed by Gramercy Tools in the US and bought three.  They have been excellent and significantly better than any others I have been able to buy in the US so far.

https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/item/GT-CMRASP.XX

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8 hours ago, Matthew_Graesch said:

Mike,

Not sure where you are located, but I also searched for a while to find rasps like I see many of the European luthiers using.  I finally found some distributed by Gramercy Tools in the US and bought three.  They have been excellent and significantly better than any others I have been able to buy in the US so far.

https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/item/GT-CMRASP.XX

Thanks for the link, I didn't think of that.  I got their bowsaw plans and made one with slight modifications.  Wow those are expensive though.   I've been thinking about making my own hand made rasps.  

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9 hours ago, MikeC said:

Thanks for the link, I didn't think of that.  I got their bowsaw plans and made one with slight modifications.  Wow those are expensive though.   I've been thinking about making my own hand made rasps.  

They are indeed a little pricey, though very much in line with similar options I found in Japan and Europe and would have had to pay for international shipping.  I have used them on two new fiddles so far and I would definitely buy them again, they have proven to be real time savers and much better than any other cheaper rasp I have had.

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18 hours ago, Matthew_Graesch said:

They are indeed a little pricey, though very much in line with similar options I found in Japan and Europe and would have had to pay for international shipping.  I have used them on two new fiddles so far and I would definitely buy them again, they have proven to be real time savers and much better than any other cheaper rasp I have had.

They look good.
The main problem with good quality rasps is the price, not cheap, but if they work well I'm convinced they are worth the price.

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  • 5 months later...

Some moments of the Casa Stradivari violin-making masterclass, to which I had the pleasure of contributing as a tutor for the first six months, dedicated to the construction of two violins. The next six months will be dedicated to the construction of the viola under the guidance of Marcello Ive, and the last six months to the construction of the cello with Primo Pistoni, which will conclude the 18-month cycle and the construction of the planned quartet. Thanks to the students of the Masterclass for their commitment and dedication, and above all to the Artistic Director Fabrizio Von Arx and to Martina Anselmi, responsible for social media communication and secretariat, as well as the author of the video shooting.

https://www.casastradivari.org/

https://www.facebook.com/fondazionecasastradivari/

https://www.instagram.com/fondazionecasastradivari/

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10 minutes ago, Davide Sora said:

 

This is great! I always get stressed about the glue gel time, and then the stress causes me to make mistakes. You have everything prepared, know what you're doing, and then everything goes smoothly. There's so much to learn from your videos.

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4 hours ago, Mike Atkins said:

This is great! I always get stressed about the glue gel time, and then the stress causes me to make mistakes. You have everything prepared, know what you're doing, and then everything goes smoothly. There's so much to learn from your videos.

If you know the behavior of your glue and the gel time very well, there is no need to rush, just stay within the timeframe it gives you. I like to make sure the glue is well distributed throughout and in the right amount, I hate rushing.:)

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13 minutes ago, Davide Sora said:

If you know the behavior of your glue and the gel time very well, there is no need to rush, just stay within the timeframe it gives you. I like to make sure the glue is well distributed throughout and in the right amount, I hate rushing.:)

Yes sir, I'm seeing more and more need to be cognizant of what I'm doing, have a plan, take notes, and also it just makes sense to actually know precisely how long it takes the glue to gel, and what proportions of glue/water to use. It's really not more effort to fill the jar on a scale vs on the bench.

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1 hour ago, Mike Atkins said:

 It's really not more effort to fill the jar on a scale vs on the bench.

Exactly. With a bit of experience, it is not necessary to do this for all gluing, but for those that are structurally important (neck joint, center joints, and bassbar) using fresh glue for each gluing respecting precise proportions allows constant results and much more peace of mind.;)

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Beautiful work as always Davide. I am starting to learn the ins and outs of hot hide glue while making my first violin. It amazes me how differently the glue reacts to different ambient temperatures. As the weather in my location is getting warmer, the open time is longer. Pretty obvious for most folks, but sometimes I am a bit remedial. In the up coming colder months, I may have to add some extra heat to my work area to keep that extended open time. :) 

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9 hours ago, Sean Couch said:

Beautiful work as always Davide. I am starting to learn the ins and outs of hot hide glue while making my first violin. It amazes me how differently the glue reacts to different ambient temperatures. As the weather in my location is getting warmer, the open time is longer. Pretty obvious for most folks, but sometimes I am a bit remedial. In the up coming colder months, I may have to add some extra heat to my work area to keep that extended open time. :) 

Thanks.

The temperature and also the humidity in the room are factors to pay close attention to, both for the gel times and for the drying time of the glue before you can remove the clamps. High humidity delays the gel time but also delays the drying time of the glue, so with high humidity a longer clamping time will be necessary, or at least it will be necessary to wait longer before stressing the joint. This is quite evident (and crucial to be aware of) even when using glue as a surface external or internal treatment of the plates.

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