Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Labled Cuypers, but assured Mittenwald


captkingdom
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 56
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

1 hour ago, LouisXVI said:

Where my point was is in ergonomics. How suitable is for her to play in a violin with such features? What when she wants to turn to a standard,  professional and  more orthodox violin?

I don't personally see an issue there, either. Students often move through the sizes and adjust readily to the changes. Often they are playing too long on an instrument that is too small, or start early on one that is too large. And then there are those who (like me) play both viola and violin. There is a far bigger difference in size there, and many double-duty players switch between them even in a single concert. I remember once attending a Guarneri Quartet performance, and Michael Tree had to take leave that day as his father, Samuel Applebaum had died. So, the performance was a trio, with Dalley on fiddle, Arnold on viola, and David of course on cello. And as you can imagine, it was a thrilling performance. 

Again back to the very true statement about the best violin being the one you want to play - if this student has found "her violin" and she loves playing it, I can't think of how that could be bad. If the time comes where she "outgrows it" literally or figuratively, she'll adjust to the new instrument like we all do, and will have benefitted from loving to play the violin. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Delabo said:

It would appear that Martin now thinks that they are Italian after all ...........................

 

https://www.martinswanviolins.com/luigi-salsedo-violin/

 

That is a sale from around 10 years ago before we did any of the research which showed otherwise …

since that time we have sold 5 or 6 (one last week in fact) all detailing our research and showing them to be Schoenbach instruments varnished and labelled by Jim Tait of Kelso

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm far from an expert, but I've noticed that some shorter viola makers seem to try to compensate with wider bouts and possibly waists?

Could someone have been trying to do something similar with this 7/8ths (ish) violin?  Keep the body length (and maybe stop-length) short, but the total resonating volume similar to a full sized violin?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, martin swan said:

That is a sale from around 20 years ago before we did any of the research which showed otherwise …

since that time we have sold 5 or 6 (one last week in fact) all detailing our research and showing them to be Schoenbach instruments varnished and labelled by Jim Tait of Kelso

 

Duly noted.

I think that this is relevant to the OP as the only reason he believed his violin to be a Cupyers was because the label said so. This illustrates the power of labels.  I quickly googled Andreas Renisto and your website entry came up first. But your shop is by no means the only one, and some places are still selling these as Italian for over £5000.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Delabo said:

Duly noted.

I think that this is relevant to the OP as the only reason he believed his violin to be a Cupyers was because the label said so. This illustrates the power of labels.  I quickly googled Andreas Renisto and your website entry came up first. But your shop is by no means the only one, and some places are still selling these as Italian for over £5000.

He didn’t believe it to be Cuypers, he believed it to be Mittenwald 

with regard to Renisto as with the OP violin I think what matters is the price paid - Renistos and Salsedos are at least the quality of a nice 1920s EH Roth.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For I brought up the topic it seems necessary to clarify that the OP violin has nothing to do with the whole Salsedo, Renisto etc. thing, but I choose just theses as examples only for the fact that there were uncountable of Vogtlandish/Bohemian violins in the white were delivered by the trade to people applying their own varnishing attempts to them.

Threre's also repeatedly the complain that it's too often stated that Dutzendarbeit violins are revarnished, with a certain undertone of disbelieve. It's just the most easy thing to do by amateurs or other "violin improvers" to strip an existing varnish from cheaply acquired instruments hoping that they had re-discovered an also alleged secret of a mysterious Cremonese varnish (or wood treatment and what's being speculated elsewhere) to alter the sound in a magical way (not to mention simple faking). It's simply much more easy to do this than to open and regraduate a violin, or to make one. Therefore it's no wonder that we can find so many of the stripped and revarnished type, and no reason to be sneery about such an anylysis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...