Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Wood filler for retouching


Goran74
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello! I have used some fillers for retouching in the past but I would like to hear your "recipes" and ideas on that. 

I have used various glues mixed with color, sawdusts mixed with glues, resins etc... 

Strobel recommends a shellac sandarac mix (at Violin maker's notebook). I used it, but without a lot of success. 

My main problem is that the most of the fillers that I used, have different light reflection in contrast to the wood next to them. They are more opaque, matt, blurry or they lack transparency. 

So, my main concerns are:

1. To be reversible 

2. To be esthetically "right"

3. To be something that does not affect the sound quality

I would appreciate your help. Thank you! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are looking for a filler for missing wood fibers, scotchlight s22 seems to be the current best option. It can be colored with various alcohol based colors.  It gets mixed with hide or bone glue and applied to the area of missing fibers (with room left for fill varnish and retouching above).  If it is unacceptable, it can be washed out.

If you are looking for fill varnish recipes a combination of manilla copal, sandarac, and light shellac can work well with copal being the dominant resin.  Additions of aluminum hydroxide can allow you to use softer resins, but may decrease clarity.  Using a matting agent allows you to vary the sheen.  With all fill varnish, the window for easy trimming doesn’t last forever.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/14/2021 at 8:01 PM, Violadamore said:

I forget who here first recommended it to me, but mixing very fine wood filings with hide glue or varnish (depending on the situation), has worked well for me.  :)

Vda... can you elaborate a bit... which type of situation for wood fillings with hide glue and which with varnish?

Thanks!... Mat

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mat Roop said:

Thanks, Vda... makes full sense... Mat

Note that it's important to use filings cut with a file instead of sawdust (which is coarsely granular) or sanding dust (which has abrasive grains in it).  The little file shavings conform better, and interlock with each other.

On things other than violins, where reversibility is not a problem, I prefer clear epoxy, super-glue, or urushiol lacquer as a binder, but on violins, they are barbarisms.  :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Note that it's important to use filings cut with a file instead of sawdust (which is coarsely granular) or sanding dust (which has abrasive grains in it).  The little file shavings conform better, and interlock with each other.

On things other than violins, where reversibility is not a problem, I prefer clear epoxy, super-glue, or urushiol lacquer as a binder, but on violins, they are barbarisms.  :)

Thanks for explaining this, I would have thought sawdust was OK. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some thoughts on surface repair fillers:

While fillers with opaque components (including wood dust) can be retouched to disappear at one angle, they tend to stick out like a sore thumb when the viewing angle or lighting angle changes, since they don't conform to the same light-handling properties as the underlying and surrounding wood.

Jerry Lynn's and Jeffrey Holmes' (in the linked thread) suggestions for using scotchlight s22 or aluminum hydroxide are really good, since they are semi-transparent, allowing the light-handling properties of the underlying wood to come through.

Another advantage of using these inert mineral-based components in either a glue or varnish-based surface repair filler is that the more mineral content you can get away with, the less shrinkage there will be. Filler varnish by itself tends to shrink a lot, and for a long time. Ideally, with enough added mineral content, the resins alone will not be the main thing taking up the space, but will only be acting as a binder for the minerals, so swelling and shrinkage will be greatly reduced.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...