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My first violin


Crimson0087
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Hello everyone,

I am deep into my first violin yay! I am just a hobby builder and never took a course just lots of you tube and reading but you guys have helped me a lot so thanks. I wanted to post my progress so far and ask a few questions. Im sure you cant tell much but here are pictures too. I do have one question. For the very edge of the violin how thin is too thin? I am trying to make the long arch template fit on my maple back but I think to get it perfect is going to require a very thin say 4mm edge. Is this too thin? How thin can I go safely? Any pointers are welcome.

 

Also some things I wish I had done differently.... Ordered a strad poster or premade templates. I attempted to print the arching templates from makingtheviolin.com but could never get the size right. If I printed it and scaled it to make the long arch the right length then the cross arches were incorrect lengths. I didnt realize this until I was far into carving so I think its made my cross arches taper down too soon and the flat area around the edge is larger than it should have been? Oh well. For my next violin I will either get a Poster with arches I can copy accurately or I will buy premade templates.v3.thumb.jpg.1ee22d7680ac8fc71ca0127b2e9c86e9.jpgv1.thumb.jpg.de50efebcc767d9c722c6f228877c8e8.jpg

 

Thanks again

Bryan Paynev2.thumb.jpg.7e5c95891e16b63bc1edfaeabbf8a880.jpg

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Hi Bryan, 

 

Nice work & I do like your helper.  I am a beginner too,  so I can't really answer your questions with authority but I'm pretty sure that 4mm edge thickness on the back is pretty standard.  Bit thicker in the corners and 'C' bout usually.   

I'm sure you will be surprised and amazed by how nice the instrument is when it's finished.  

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I'm a beginner too and will be at least until I've made about a hundred of them :D  I've been using 4.5 mm for edge thickness and 5mm for the corners but I think 4mm is ok.   Don't be to concerned with a little too much flatness around the edges.   That could be a good thing on a first build since a common beginner mistake is to have the arches too full too near the edges.  Blend that area into the edges with some concave recurve and it will be good.

My only critique is that your corners look too long.  For your next build get a Strad poster and copy the corner blocks from the CT scan on the poster.   Maestronet is a great resource and so is Davide Sora's youtube videos.  Watch them all!  

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When making a first violin, it would be exceedingly helpful to have an old violin to look at on your table whilst doing it. Not necessarily to copy, but something you can orientate on. Even a broken old Markneukirchen “Dutzendarbeit” would serve the purpose, since they had made hundreds of violins before, and knew what they were doing. It would save you having to wonder about thousands of details

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Don't file the rib corners.  Just decrease the overhang of the plate so your corners are the right shape.  Not a big deal.  It's ideal to have the correct overhang, but it's much more important that the plate corners are pretty.  

You can trace the plate corners of the pattern you're using and create templates.  That will help you get a sense of a good corner shape.  

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image.png.e797afb3b70acf84b16448a8e72a0b05.pngimage.jpeg.f163e52388de8a7b042aa143cee5463c.jpeg

 

You should just fix your corners now, if you don’t you will regret it,,, they are really too long to ever look tasteful.

The blocks are square so you still have a good clamping surface. Clamp a little roll of cloth on the lower outside corners and wet it for a bit,, then heat it and the ribs will fall back off. Reshape the block and glue them back. Do both bottoms then both tops at the same time. Not a big deal at all. If your queasy about the instability of the structure,,, glue it onto a piece of cardboard  on the upper half to just above the lower corners to stabilize it till you are through.  Then repeat  the same for the upper corners.

The linings are there to register the parts, draw some lines top and back to help register things if you want the assurance.

You have plenty of other things to do while you wait for

glue to soften,

 then dissemble,

 then  wood to dry,

 reshape the corners

then glue and clamp

and now, glue to dry.

No big hurry, the time is there, the experience is awaiting you.

Compared to some restorations this is really child’s play.

Just be careful and know you can do this, move slowly and cautiously and nothing will get broken.

Not a big deal at all.

You’ll be glad you did.

Evan

The Hard Taskmaster.

 

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3 hours ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

Don't file the rib corners.  Just decrease the overhang of the plate so your corners are the right shape.  Not a big deal.  It's ideal to have the correct overhang, but it's much more important that the plate corners are pretty.  

 

No, that won't fix it. The rib corners are waaaaay too long, and even a negative plate overhang will leave the plate corners too long.

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9 minutes ago, Evan Smith said:

I believe it can be completely restored to the original intent,

easily,,, like falling off a log.:)

Yes, you and DB are correct.  My original suggestion was not meant to fix it completely, just improve it somewhat.  That's what I was referring to as inadequate.  If OP wants to really fix it, the process you described should get him there.  

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I can't unglue them, I used tight bond. I did it bc I was not sure I'd be able to get the corners clamped fast enough with hide glue and since this is my first violin I really just see the whole process as a rough draft. What do y'all think about this though? Mike c noted that my ribs extend too far past the blocks. I could shave maybe 2 mm off the ribs bring them closer to the blocks and then have the top plate corners be filed closer to the ribs. Shorten the overhang some. I currently have the overhang at like 3mm so go to maybe 1.5? It won't be perfect but it's a learning curve. On a side note my mother wants to get me a Christmas gift and I was going to ask her to order me a violin poster for my second violin. Can I get suggestions on what is a good model to make? This one is the Messiah? What would you guys say is the most popular violin model played/made today? Or a better model to make next than the Messiah?

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22 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

I’m not sure about that.  But you could find out by gluing a rib scrap to a block and trying to separate them.

Titebond, if the original recipe, is affected by both heat and moisture. Guitar repairers have to do it quite regularly.

Even if the OP can’t get the ribs apart, there is no point in continuing to use this garland, for the reasons already stated above, and the points made by Andrew Victor.
It would make more sense to make new ribs, and try to save the plates, if possible.

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7 minutes ago, Dave Slight said:

Titebond, if the original recipe, is affected by both heat and moisture. Guitar repairers have to do it quite regularly.

Yes, it's not a problem. Stewmac even sell an iron for heating fingerboards to remove them if you don't dare borrow the family iron.

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