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Smashed Cello


reg
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Hello all - Just posting pics of a catastrophic Cello accident

The Cello is new, by Gewa worth under £3000 - the player tripped fell forward and then fell full onto the Cello

The bridge and scroll (snapping the head)took the first impact, then her full weight sorted out the back quite successfully

In processing the insurance claim I submitted that as the bridge and strings and scroll took the full impact they were compromised and had no salvage value

Would you agree?

 

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7 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

Hello all - Just posting pics of a catastrophic Cello accident

Vdm thanks, no she was fine, just a bit shaken - but of course devastated after the excitement of her first upgrade Cello! We do have a replacement for her.

Interesting how neatly the bridge has sliced through the table?

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18 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

This is the one and only nice thing about an assembly line instrument, it is exactly the same as countless others, so just go back to the store and buy another one. Better, save your money and buy a better cello.

...hmm...

...but you are interested in assembly line bows...

...not so sure about pigeon-holing every new factory cello...

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2 hours ago, Rue said:

...hmm...

...but you are interested in assembly line bows...

...not so sure about pigeon-holing every new factory cello...

No, they are the same in essence but not in detail.

but a factory cello that has survived 100+ years is different from one made last month, that can be-and is-replicated daily. And this particular cello is definitely one of them.

also the factory cellos from 100+ years ago had far more care and handwork and were generally Made of better materials because those materials were far more plentiful.

Remember the article that Jacob shared, called, “a spray gun for the varnish.”

This is even more true of nice old factory bows, because attrition has claimed far more of them. So yes indeed, I completely stand behind my comment.


This particular Cello has a model number, and replacing it is as simple as buying another model with the same designation. However, even a nice old factory Cello from 100 years ago, damaged this badly, would be destined for the fireplace.

Edited by PhilipKT
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Yeah, he said it snapped but the pictures look like the neck popped off the body perfectly cleanly. I don't see any damage to the head...unless it's on the other side we can't see.

If you have an inexpensive cello with a broken neck, might be able to replace the neck with this one? (I am not a luthier so feel free to laugh at me if I'm loud wrong.)

Relieved to hear that the player was unhurt if shaken. I'm sure it was quite traumatic to destroy an instrument.

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2 hours ago, reg said:

Apropos the strings I just thought that as they cross the bridge under tension, the trauma of being rammed into the ground would result in a flattening and hence weakness if put under tension again?

Maybe.  If the ground was soft, the strings probably weren't flattened much.  The only way to find out if they have been weakened is to put them on another cello, tune them to their proper pitches and see if they break.

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