Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

(Beginner question) Burned ribs


Totolacky

Recommended Posts

Hi! I'm a beginner who is trying to make a viola.
I've tried bending the C-bout ribs, but slightly burned a single piece (the right one in the image).

Would this burn be removable by slightly using some sandpaper, or would it remain there?

Do you have any suggestions on how to remove (or take care of) this burn? Or do you recommend re-doing the ribs with another piece of wood?

Thanks a lot in advance :)

ribs.thumb.jpg.e99359a7fa426b1f3e9d1afee1db6691.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Totolacky said:

Hi! I'm a beginner who is trying to make a viola.
I've tried bending the C-bout ribs, but slightly burned a single piece (the right one in the image).

Would this burn be removable by slightly using some sandpaper, or would it remain there?

Do you have any suggestions on how to remove (or take care of) this burn? Or do you recommend re-doing the ribs with another piece of wood?

Thanks a lot in advance :)

Leave them as it is and go on with the work, when you finish the outside of the ribs they will most probably disappear, they do not seem like very deep burns. Even if some traces remains, it will only be a tool mark like any other, to testify that the ribs have been bent by hand.:)

Occasionally these burns are also visible on valuable antique instruments (Strad and others).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before bending ribs, I always hold a cutoff section against the bending iron for at least ten seconds, to see if burn marks appear. Not that burn marks will define good from bad work, so I agree with what Sora has already opined. It's just one of the many steps I take in the quest of producing a high quality product. And unlike some other quality control steps, this one only takes about ten seconds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Before bending ribs, I always hold a cutoff section against the bending iron for at least ten seconds, to see if burn marks appear. Not that burn marks will define good from bad work, so I agree with what Sora has already opined. It's just one of the many steps I take in the quest of producing a high quality product. And unlike some other quality control steps, this one only takes about ten seconds.

This is a great tip!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...