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Super stubborn neck block


Michael Richwine
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2 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

How did you attach the steam tube to the pressure cooker?

The pressure cooker had a roughly 1/4" tube sticking out on top for the usual pressure cooker weight, so I just used 1/4" fuel line and a spring hose clamp to secure the hose. On the other end of the hose I used an old sound post as a plug, drilled for a tight friction fit with the 3/32" copper tube. Secured the wooden plug/ sound post in the hose with a tighter spring clamp. Made a hand piece out of wood thick enough for insulation. That was the most time consuming; had to use chalk for a lube to get the tube through the hand piece, and by the time the plug was in the hose, it wasn't going anywhere. The only thing that gets hot is the hose itself, the copper tube, and the steam coming out. If I were to do it again I could improve it, but it's probably not worth the time, considering my schedule. It works fine now.

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2 hours ago, Michael Richwine said:

The pressure cooker had a roughly 1/4" tube sticking out on top for the usual pressure cooker weight, so I just used 1/4" fuel line and a spring hose clamp to secure the hose. On the other end of the hose I used an old sound post as a plug, drilled for a tight friction fit with the 3/32" copper tube. Secured the wooden plug/ sound post in the hose with a tighter spring clamp. Made a hand piece out of wood thick enough for insulation. That was the most time consuming; had to use chalk for a lube to get the tube through the hand piece, and by the time the plug was in the hose, it wasn't going anywhere. The only thing that gets hot is the hose itself, the copper tube, and the steam coming out. If I were to do it again I could improve it, but it's probably not worth the time, considering my schedule. It works fine now.

And you now have a new tool in your arsenal for stubborn glue joints that don't want to let go. A repair shop can never have enough tools for specialty tasks.

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13 hours ago, Michael Richwine said:

The pressure cooker had a roughly 1/4" tube sticking out on top for the usual pressure cooker weight, so I just used 1/4" fuel line…

It seems to me that if the steam is always able to escape through the 3/32” copper tube you don’t get much, if any, pressure build up in the cooker vessel.  Therefore, I should be able to make a steam rig by installing a hose connection in the lid of just about any small cooking pot.  What do you think?

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34 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

It seems to me that if the steam is always able to escape through the 3/32” copper tube you don’t get much, if any, pressure build up in the cooker vessel.  Therefore, I should be able to make a steam rig by installing a hose connection in the lid of just about any small cooking pot.  What do you think?

If you develop 1 PSI of steam pressure through a 3/32 inch tube, you'll have considerable pressure lifting on the surface are of the pot lid. If the lid is 10 square inches of surface area, you'll have 10 lbs of lift and it'll pop the lid off.

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33 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

It seems to me that if the steam is always able to escape through the 3/32” copper tube you don’t get much, if any, pressure build up in the cooker vessel.  Therefore, I should be able to make a steam rig by installing a hose connection in the lid of just about any small cooking pot.  What do you think?

If you develop 1 PSI of steam pressure through a 3/32 inch tube, you'll have considerable pressure lifting on the surface are of the pot lid. If the lid is 10 square inches of surface area, you'll have 10 lbs of lift and it'll pop the lid off.

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3 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

It seems to me that if the steam is always able to escape through the 3/32” copper tube you don’t get much, if any, pressure build up in the cooker vessel.  Therefore, I should be able to make a steam rig by installing a hose connection in the lid of just about any small cooking pot.  What do you think?

The diameter of the pressure cooker lid is 10 inches, surface area about 78 square inches. Minimum pressure setting on the pressure cooker is 20 kPa, about 3 psi, and produces adequate steam at the point of application. 3 psi would translate to roughly 234 lb of lifting force on the lid. 1 psi of steam pressure wouldn't be enough. You could use a small pressure cooker on a hotplate, which is what I set out to do, but the newer ones are self contained with timers and other features, so I just went with what was readily available. "Improvise, adapt, overcome." along with "Use it up. Wear it out. Make it do, or do without. Virtues of a military/ redneck upbringing.

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3 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

...it'll pop the lid off.

I don't think it would pop off.  I think it would lift up a bit until enough steam could escape to relieve the excess pressure inside.  But would there be enough pressure in the pot under these conditions to make the steam go through the tube and out the needle?

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34 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

I don't think it would pop off.  I think it would lift up a bit until enough steam could escape to relieve the excess pressure inside.  But would there be enough pressure in the pot under these conditions to make the steam go through the tube and out the needle?

Just from cooking  experience, you hardly need any perceptible pressure at all to make a pot lid dance, and that wouldn't push enough steam through a hose to keep it hot enough not to condense. You have to have enough volume to keep steam live up to the point of application. That's one reason I was thinking about shortening up the hose. One alternative would be a teakettle and stopper with fitted nipple or any similar chemistry setup. As I wrote earlier, I just went with what was convenient, fast and cheap. The newer pressure cookers are self-contained, adjustable, portable, semi-automatic. I only wish this one weren't so bulky.

Steamgen.jpg

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On 10/10/2021 at 7:54 PM, Michael Richwine said:

Found a like-new pressure cooker for $15 at the thrift shop. It lets me adjust the steam pressure from 20 to 80 kpa. Also found brass tubing in 1.6 and 2.4mm OD, so don't need the Stew-Mac stuff. Only expensive thing was some 1/4" fuel line.  Got plenty of cork and stuff and can get chemistry stoppers as needed but should have something to test in the morning. May have to make a more durable connection for the hose to the steam pot, and I'll need to maybe craft an insulated handle after the concept proves out. so far, everything is testing out just fine. Total budget under $50 US. Most expensive item, 8 feet of 1/4 inch fuel line at $3.79 per foot. Have to have the hose pretty hot so that steam doesn't condense in the hose, and you need a needle in the hose to build up enough back pressure to get live, wet steam to the point you're interested in. I think 1000 watts should be plenty. Just need to be double careful to keep everything tight if there's any kind of pressure. I've been scalded before, and don't care to repeat.

I would love to see a photo of your set up.

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