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Shipping Insurance


Jeff Krieger
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I don't have experience shipping bows, but I know that some people use sections of PVC drain pipe for that. I don't know that the usual musical instrument insurers would cover shipping, but I used used to work for a glass artist, and we shipped some incredibly complicated and expensive glass. When you ship, you need to declare the value and insure appropriately through the shipper.

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1) Use a PVC pipe, but place the pipe inside a triangular or rectangular box so it does not roll around. Use bubble wrap or packing peanuts inside the box to cushion the pipe.

2) Photograph each step of the packing process so you can prove it was carefully and properly packed.

3) You can insure things with UPS, but I don't know what or if there is an upper value limit.

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If you are going to be shipping out bows on a regular basis I strongly suggest you speak to your insurance company and get some kind of 'goods in transit' cover on your policy. It will save you money in the long run and you don't want to be individually insuring every package you send out if you do it quite often. The courier insurance fees are very high.

Goods in transit will cover you as long as you can provide evidence of the shipment details.

It will also cover bows that get sent back to you from being on trial. The person trying them won't need to insure them when sending them back to you.

I used to work for a music tech company and I helped arrange the insurance policies.

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2 hours ago, Shelbow said:

If you are going to be shipping out bows on a regular basis I strongly suggest you speak to your insurance company and get some kind of 'goods in transit' cover on your policy. It will save you money in the long run and you don't want to be individually insuring every package you send out if you do it quite often. The courier insurance fees are very high.

Goods in transit will cover you as long as you can provide evidence of the shipment details.

It will also cover bows that get sent back to you from being on trial. The person trying them won't need to insure them when sending them back to you.

I agree completely... Insurance offered through shipping companies is usually quite expensive and the claim process can be agonizing.

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