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Bridge Wood


JackSchmidling
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Getting back to the res freq test set up,

I took a piece of maple 5 mm thick and 30 x 50 and milled away 2 mm of one surface down to about 1/4" from the bottom for the feet in the vice.

Before milling, it had a res freq of around 800kc and after milling about 600 kc. This is exactly the opposite of what I had expected.

What am I missing?

Jack
 

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Seems like at least half of the arguments for using Maple for  bridges is the ease of cutting it.

One can't help but wonder if power tools had existed "back then", if the preferred wood may be very different now.

Having a fully equipped wood and metal working shop which includes a few hand planes that have never been used, it is hard to understand why any one would use a knife or hand plane to shape a bridge.

I can do on a belt sander in 30 seconds what one could spend an hour or so with the traditional tools.

So, the obvious question is... why not a belt sander?

Jack

 

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11 hours ago, JackSchmidling said:

Having a fully equipped wood and metal working shop which includes a few hand planes that have never been used, it is hard to understand why any one would use a knife or hand plane to shape a bridge.

LOL, I actually got a chuckle out of that statement, since one does not become fast and proficient with a hand plane by never using it! It is a high skill requiring practice, and ideally some hands-on personal instruction.... a little like learning to play the violin well.

To respond to the question in your first post of this thread: Maple is used for bridges because just about everything has already been tried, and maple still comes out on top in terms of the preferred sound. For example, just yesterday, I ran across a fiberglass-skinned balsa-core experimental cello bridge that I made about 40 years ago. I have also made one or two with the carbon fiber reinforcing strips, similar to what FiddleDoug illustrated in another thread.

There's an interesting axiom in the fiddle trade: "You aren't the first genius to work on violins."  ;)

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10 hours ago, JackSchmidling said:

 

1.  it is hard to understand why any one would use a knife or hand plane to shape a bridge.

2.  I can do on a belt sander in 30 seconds what one could spend an hour or so with the traditional tools.

1.  Unneeded dust is one reason.

2.  Depends on what the project is.

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"I can do on a belt sander in 30 seconds what one could spend an hour or so with the traditional tools.

So, the obvious question is... why not a belt sander?"

If it takes you an hour to plane and rough trim a bridge, you're doing something wrong. We've seen the quality of the work on you're belt sanded bridges, so that should be answer enough. You don't really address fitting the bridge feet with the belt sander, so here's an addition to your tool arsenal:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1XXuo3hv6U

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