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D27
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Hello, I would like to receive suggestions for a romantic Violin Concero, Sonata or pieces, about the same difficulty as Vivaldi A minor., which would allow the student to focus more on romantic phrasing and vibrato.

Thank you.

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3 hours ago, D27 said:

Hello, I would like to receive suggestions for a romantic Violin Concero, Sonata or pieces, about the same difficulty as Vivaldi A minor., which would allow the student to focus more on romantic phrasing and vibrato.

Thank you.

Vivaldi A minor is not really enough to gauge skill level in my opinion.  When I learned the Vivaldi A minor, I was already learning shifting exercises well into 5th and 6th positions.  

Kabalevski Vln Cto - 1st mvt may be a bit difficult but doable.  Is it romantic era? Not entirely sure. lol

Tchaikovsky - Chanson Triste is short, simple, not too difficult.

Dancla - I am not entirely sure if it was the Six Airs or some other Dancla short pieces but they are doable and quite frankly very nice.

Monti - Czardas.  I learned this early on and it is doable.  

Beethoven - Spring Sonata 1st mvt.  May be a bit difficult. I tend not to teach Beethoven too early on.  

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Yes, romantic era, to contrast with baroque. I want something around the same skill level for the left hand, "the notes", positions, as Vivaldi A minor. The point is to focus more on sound production, phrasing and vibrato. It's for 14 year olds who have been learning for 4 years.

I was never really curious to check out other music other than what my teachers give me, over the many years I studied. And I didn't use to listen to erudite music much either. So now I don't know a lot of repertoire.

Those suggestions seem good, maybe except for Monti and Beethoven, which I know but they're too hard for now. Thanks.

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4 minutes ago, deans said:

How about Dvorak sonatina op 100. Maybe not exactly what you are thinking but its a technically approachable romantic era piece.

Also a very good one, I recognize it from somewhere. :D

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7 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

Schubert sonatinas are great, easier than Beethoven (for piano too!).  DeBeriot concerto #9 is a good showpiece around that level, which sounds harder than it is.  

DeBeriot #9 is technically much more difficult than the Vivaldi A minor.  If I remember correctly, there are tons of runs up to the 6th position on the e-string and some other technically difficult passages.  

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The Goldmark concerto is an excellent choice. The Bruch as well but you probably already know that one.

there is a wealth of shorter pieces by French composers: Faure, Godard, Massenet, Gounod.

for purity of tone I always love the Haydn G major, not romantic period but a greatly underrated masterpiece.

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On 9/10/2021 at 11:33 AM, D27 said:

 

I was never really curious to check out other music other than what my teachers give me, over the many years I studied. And I didn't use to listen to erudite music much either. So now I don't know a lot of repertoire.

My website has a post devoted to exactly that problem.

The way to solve it now is to just expose yourself to as much as you can. Although I hate I IMSLP because it is putting publishers out of business, Go there and look up violin music. You can download the stuff for free and you can play through almost limitless music to find out what you think is worthwhile.

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I could list music forever and it would be meaningless unless you listen. But listen to everything. I had never heard of Auguste Chapuis but he wrote some highly valuable music, charming and deep without being too difficult or long.

you’ve never heard of Benjamin Godard, but he wrote some great short pieces including one called Sur Le Lac, apparently one version each for cello and violin. Fantastic piece. The violin version is better. You done know Ernest Chausson either, but he wrote a great Poeme for violin and orchestra and then died tragically. May be some good short pieces as well. I discover music all the time. At cello chat I regularly post “today’s music” which is rare and worthwhile music I have discovered, as well as some awful stuff I’ve discovered. It does go both ways.

I am carrying on a bit so I’ll stop. Look far afield for your music and do so for your kids as well.

 

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On 9/12/2021 at 3:28 AM, PhilipKT said:

The Goldmark concerto is an excellent choice. The Bruch as well but you probably already know that one.

Of course I do, how is Bruch close to Vivaldi A minor? :P

 

I've been listening and checking the sheet music of everything suggested here, the winners are:

-Dancla Air Varie Nº1

-Dancla Air Varie Nº4

-Dvorak Sonatina op.100

Dvorak is a bit harder but not much, maybe a bit too long. Thanks everyone.

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16 hours ago, D27 said:

Of course I do, how is Bruch close to Vivaldi A minor? :P

 

I've been listening and checking the sheet music of everything suggested here, the winners are:

-Dancla Air Varie Nº3

-Dancla Air Varie Nº4

-Dvorak Sonatina op.100

Dvorak is a little bit harder but not too much. Thanks everyone.

Bruch Vln Cto is WAY too difficult for someone who just learned Vivaldi A minor.

The progression (sample) from Vivaldi to Bruch, in my opinion, is: 1) all six Dancla airs, 2) at least one Handel Sonata, 3) Bach A minor cto, 4) Bach E maj cto, 5) Accolay A min cto, 6) Viotti 23, 7) haydn C maj cto, and then possibly Bruch...

This list is from my personal method of teaching repertoire.  I tend to focus heavily on baroque (mostly Bach) and slowly work my students up to classical era...saving romantic era for much later.  This is not to say that I don't throw in some classical and romantic, even bluegrass and fiddle pieces along the way.

The Dancla pieces are short, you should teach all 6.

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3 hours ago, violinnewb said:

Bruch Vln Cto is WAY too difficult for someone who just learned Vivaldi A minor.

It was a rhetorical question :D

I like your ordering, two Bach concertos in a row can probably be avoided though. I like Vivaldi A minor, but curiously I didn't' play it when I was a student, my teacher gave me Vivaldi G minor. I think is a little step above A minor and sounds a bit romantic.

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4 hours ago, violinnewb said:

Bruch Vln Cto is WAY too difficult for someone who just learned Vivaldi A minor.

The progression (sample) from Vivaldi to Bruch, in my opinion, is: 1) all six Dancla airs, 2) at least one Handel Sonata, 3) Bach A minor cto, 4) Bach E maj cto, 5) Accolay A min cto, 6) Viotti 23, 7) haydn C maj cto, and then possibly Bruch...

This list is from my personal method of teaching repertoire.  I tend to focus heavily on baroque (mostly Bach) and slowly work my students up to classical era...saving romantic era for much later.  This is not to say that I don't throw in some classical and romantic, even bluegrass and fiddle pieces along the way.

The Dancla pieces are short, you should teach all 6.

Not Haydn G? I love both concertos, but have always thought the G to be better for phrasing and sound quality development, while the C might be better for refined technique. And then of course, Mozart 3 or 4.

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21 hours ago, D27 said:

It was a rhetorical question :D

I like your ordering, two Bach concertos in a row can probably be avoided though. I like Vivaldi A minor, but curiously I didn't' play it when I was a student, my teacher gave me Vivaldi G minor. I think is a little step above A minor and sounds a bit romantic.

I teach the entire Bach A minor and only the first mvt of the E major.  I agree that two in a row is alot, but I find that Bach lays a firm ground work for Mozart.  The E major has alot of nice rhythms and phrases.  It is very complex.

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18 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

Not Haydn G? I love both concertos, but have always thought the G to be better for phrasing and sound quality development, while the C might be better for refined technique. And then of course, Mozart 3 or 4.

I learned Haydn C mainly because I love the C major Cello cto so much.  But after that, I don't want to keep my students waiting too long to get to Mozart 3.  When it comes time for Mozart 4, I have already sent my students off to a much, much better teacher.  

To clarify, I have not taught the Bruch, although I studied it intensely, because I just feel at that point, my students need someone a bit more technically seasoned than me.

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3 hours ago, violinnewb said:

Vivaldi G minor is much more technical.  I learned that one after I learned Bach A minor.  Yes, I think it is more difficult than the A minor.

Maybe we aren't talking about the same one. G Major 

 

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9 minutes ago, D27 said:

Maybe we aren't talking about the same one. G Major 

 

My apologies! The G Major is a tiny, tiny bit easier than the A minor.  The G Minor is much more difficult than both of the previously mentioned ones.

I failed to remember that Vivaldi wrote a TON of concertos lol

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