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Rehairing cheap Glasser bow.


JackSchmidling
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I recently upgraded to a higher quality bow after using the one that came with the violin for 50 years.

Can't say I can tell much difference but what can one expect after only 50 years.

I thought it would be fun to rehair the old bow just for experience and to have a better backup.

I bought a couple rehair kits on Ebay and couldn't wait to get into it when they arrived today.

In dis-assembling the old bow I came up with a bit of schlock and a brick wall.

The frog end is held down with a screw and the tip end eludes me completely.

It looks like it could be a plastic wedge with a hole in the middle of it but no obvious way to get it out.

Any help would make my day.

Jack

 

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2 minutes ago, FiddleDoug said:

Have you rehaired bows before? If you have, you should be able to figure out a Glasser. Just use a small screw to remove the tip wedge, and go from there.

My thoughts exactly but didn't want to pull on something that isn't supposed to be pulled.  I did check for threads but no joy. 

 

I have never rehaired before but have done a lot of reading and looking.  Had not run into this plastic thing.

 

Thanks,

 

Jack

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A Glasser head plug is made of plastic and has a hole in it.  It can be easily removed by inserting a rigid tool (I use a small steel awl, but a small nail would also probably work.) in the hole and twisting the tool gently away from the butt end of the stick.  The plastic plug can be reused, but I sometimes undercut the mortise and make a wood plug to replace the plastic one.

Glasser ferrules with the original plastic wedges are always difficult to remove.  I clamp the edges of the ferrule in a vise and wiggle the frog off the ferrule.  For Glasser ferrules I make an exception to my rule of never clamping ferrules in vises.  I always replace the plastic wedges with regular wooden ones.

The hair is removed from a Glasser frog by unscrewing the screw that holds it in.

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9 hours ago, JackSchmidling said:

....I have never rehaired before but have done a lot of reading and looking. ....

 

and now you will do a lot of trial and error. Its a lot tougher than you might imagine to get the rehair just right.... especially on a standard bow... Glassers are easier. Make sure you have a few extra hanks of hair on hand! ... and be sure to buy high quality hair.... good luck!

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4 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

What do you get with an Ebay repair kit?

2 hanks violin size, tied off at one end and some wedges that I believe are just blanks to be carved for about $12 including s&h.

Fortunately, the plastic wedges on the bow are still usable so I don't have to deal with carving them.

Decided to go with the Nehr approach and did the frog first with no particular problem but that ends his approach.   I put a drop of CA glue on the tied end and after curing, attached it to the frog with the screw and wedge, ferrule and cover piece.

Combing it out became a real hassle and seemed hopelessly tangled until I looked at the tangles under the microscope.  Seems like I managed to get a bit of CA on the hair about 4 inches from the end.  After teasing apart what I could, I had to cut out 6 hairs.  Could have been worse but I got lucky.

That's where I am at now.  Don't quite follow his knots and wrapping but I will work something out using silk button hole thread.

Seems like most of his problem was because he did not have someone to help hold the hair or thread while he was doing it.  My wife has been drafted to assist here.

Jack

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, JackSchmidling said:

...I...did the frog first...

I have never done frog first, so I cannot advise you.  Except to suggest that you err on side side of cutting the hair too long rather than too short, because if you leave cut it too long you can always cut it again shorter, but if you cut it too short...

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I can't imaging doing the frog first on a Glasser bow!! If you do the tip first, all you have to do it get the straight length correct, and put the screw in. Easy to adjust! If you do the frog first, you have to deal with bending the hair over and around the tip wedge, and then figuring out if the length is correct. Much harder to judge and adjust!

Nobody I know needs someone else to hold the hair or thread!

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FD says:

>I can't imaging doing the frog first on a Glasser bow!! If you do the tip first, all you have to do it get the straight length correct, and put the screw in. Easy to adjust! If you do the frog first, you have to deal with bending the hair over and around the tip wedge..

Seems like you have to do that either way.

> and then figuring out if the length is correct. Much harder to judge and adjust!

Well, I just followed M. Nehr's method and the length came out perfectly. I have about 90% of the frog travel left.

I did have some trouble getting the plug in so I made the special tool in the pic. It fits the hole in the plug snugly so I can line it up and tap it with a hammer.

>Nobody I know needs someone else to hold the hair or thread!

Well, now you do, my name is Jack... nice to meet you.

In light of the fact that it is unlikely that I will ever do this again, it was expedient to have a helper.

The re-hair is a success but not sure how to grade my work.

How many points do I deduct for each hair I had to nip off?

At partial tension, I had to remove 6 hairs that were sagging.

Thanks for all the help.

Jack
 

668072355_hair003.jpg.76b2a337fea54915668757f5a14b9f77.jpg

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7 hours ago, JackSchmidling said:

...most of his problem was because he did not have someone to help hold the hair or thread while he was [tying off the hair ends]...

At first look, tying off the hair would seem to require three hands  -- one to hold the hair and two to tie the thread  --  but it can be done easily with two hands.  My first rehairing instructor made a big knot in one end of the thread and held that end in his teeth while he held the hair in one hand and tied the knot with the other.  I did this for a few years.  My second instructor attached a spool of thread to the front edge of the bench, held the hair in one hand and tied the knot with the other, which is what I do now.

You can practice knot tying on old hair that you have removed from a bow.

Doug is right that head first makes much more sense than frog first for a Glasser bow.

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