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Density calculator


H.R.Fisher
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 Where can I find an online wood density calculator? There was one online which for some reason has been taken off.

                                                                                     Thanks   Henry

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For the equationally challenged, starting with a uniform wedge:

density in g/cc = mass(g), divide by length (cm), divide width (cm). divide by the average of the thick edge and thin edge (i.e. thick/2 + thin/2) also in cm.

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For those who are both equationally and verbally challenged (as well as baffled by search engines), here's a selection:

https://www.timberpolis.com/calc-timber-weight.php

https://www.timberaid.com/calculator/fundamental/density

ttps://www.easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/density-wood-calculator.php

[Cuts a 1 cm cube from a block of wood, tosses it on a scale, and mutters, "Who needs a calculator?"] :lol::)

 

 

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Quick question about measuring cello tops/backs. I don’t have a scale that will go high enough for the front or back. Would taking a smaller chunk off the wedge give the accurate results or at least accurate enough?

Jesse

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23 hours ago, Violadamore said:

For those who are both equationally and verbally challenged (as well as baffled by search engines), here's a selection:

https://www.timberpolis.com/calc-timber-weight.php

https://www.timberaid.com/calculator/fundamental/density

ttps://www.easycalculation.com/physics/classical-physics/density-wood-calculator.php

[Cuts a 1 cm cube from a block of wood, tosses it on a scale, and mutters, "Who needs a calculator?"] :lol::)

 

 

well, but what do I do, play pinball all day?  :D

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On 7/31/2021 at 9:43 AM, chiaroscuro_violins said:

\rho ={\frac {m}{V}}

 

On 7/31/2021 at 10:33 AM, Don Noon said:

For the equationally challenged, starting with a uniform wedge:

density in g/cc = mass(g), divide by length (cm), divide width (cm). divide by the average of the thick edge and thin edge (i.e. thick/2 + thin/2) also in cm.

This is always for the overall average relative weight. It works for maple but in spruce there seem to be variations within a wedge. It is possible that the wood density variation is important too. 

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1 hour ago, Andreas Preuss said:

 

This is always for the overall average relative weight. It works for maple but in spruce there seem to be variations within a wedge. It is possible that the wood density variation is important too. 

Yeah, but since most of us don't have a CT scanner handy to check for local density variations, this is about all we deal with.  Visually, there can be clues... i.e. wide dark fall growth rings indicating higher density.  I wouldn't mind such grain at the edges of a plate, but not along the center.

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9 hours ago, Don Noon said:

Yeah, but since most of us don't have a CT scanner handy to check for local density variations, this is about all we deal with.  Visually, there can be clues... i.e. wide dark fall growth rings indicating higher density.  I wouldn't mind such grain at the edges of a plate, but not along the center.

You can cut test pieces from inside and at the border. (Mine are 200x20x5) I usually take the inside piece as a reference. Because you need to split it off in the inside, It gives also a pretty precise view on how the grain runs in that critical area.

if you have a very thick wedge you could also slice off 5mm with a band saw on the whole surface and take it as a reference. 
———————————

Which grain structure is best in which place is usually answered by the wedge and the outside of the tree faces the joint anyway, and accordingly hard and wide yearrings from the inside of the tree automatically fall at the border. 
 

It might be more crucial how much you angle the yearrings to the plane of the underside.

 

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