Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Protective Leather on edge?


PhilipKT

Recommended Posts

So the varnish on the edge of my cello has worn a little bit, because I play a lot, I apparently sweat a lot, and I am remiss in cleaning my instrument.

I had my bow guy put a little strip of leather on the handle of my bow to protect the wood, I am wondering if there’s any reason I cannot do the same to my cello?

I’ve never seen it done before, but I would imagine it wouldn’t cause any problems at all?

what saith the crowd?

55D6655F-66B0-43CB-9FB5-D034C086AF85.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think tape is applied to the rib, but not to the edge.  I think the shape of the edge would make it impossible to get good adhesion of a thin strip of tape to just the edge or a wider strip to the rib and edge

I have never seen a leather edge protector, but I can't think of any reason not to do it.  The only concern would be the choice of glue.  You wouldn't want to use glue that would prevent the leather from being completely removed or that would prevent varnish touch-up on the edge.  Hide glue would seem to be the best choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Dwight Brown said:

Usually they use some special clear tape, at least on violin and viola.

DLB

There is some contact paper, which is what you are referring to, on my rib, but I have tried it on the edge in the curve and the semi circular nature of the edge make it impossible for the tape to work because it can’t curve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

personally I'd go get a small can of Zinnser shellac and just touch my finger tip in the sauce and then rub it in, making sure I had very little on my finger so it would not slop over the edge, do two to three light applications with 2 hour dry times in between, that way it will seal the edge , change the color back to natural sealed wood look and you can just reapply often as needed, I would do this soon before too much dirt gets mushed in to the ever increasing rawness ....wash your hands good and make sure they are clean before rubbing in the shellac, it is very simple, cheap and easy, just be sparring and go easy so as to not slop or drip any onto the top or ribs, even then, just wipe it off quick and buff, but if your careful , it super easy way to deal with this and not need some stupid bumper or tape, which will just eff it up more down the road with the adhesive....

ps, in a sherlock holmes kind of way I can tell that you have good stewardship in that you are one who always makes sure you have washed and cleaned your hands prior to practice, the amount of rubbing and sweat and practice time that it takes to do what you have done to that edge, many other instruments would have been "browned out" from dirt, your edge is still quite blonde, implying one who has washed their hands and removed dirt trapping oils that would collect dirt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

If you see your luthier often, you could have them periodically apply seedlac over the worn edge to protect it.  But we're not looking for known solutions, we're trying to determine the merit of using leather.  Personally, I'd rather wear through my varnish.  But that's because I'm a sucker for genuine "antiquing."  It's not great for the instrument.  The leather might be thick enough to bother your hand when compared with the bare edge; the placement of the edge relative to the string length is very precise, although I don't know if it has to be that precise.  Almost certainly the leather would loosen around the edges over time, like a bow grip does.  We all know how annoying that is.  If you're curious, give it a go.  But please first consult the luthier who regularly works on your cello.  

A leather strip could easily be applied with the right adhesive {that would need to be re glued every once in awhile} but then people might start calling him the "leather tuscedero"  :lol: personally I'm not sure I'd want to deal with that, and frankly I suppose there's a one in a million chance that your leather armor {which is not great as far as hit points go} could fail in the middle of a performance and cause a problem that could cause a mistake and create a "rip off my leather" moment in the middle of a performance. Like Janet Jackson or something.

To dip your finger in a can and rub it in does not require a luthier imo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

This depends on how expensive your instrument is.  It's pretty low skill and pretty low risk.  And yet... I am not insinuating anything about Philip in particular... you should NEVER underestimate the incompetence of human beings.  

"Hey Mister can I paint your porch for 5 bucks? "

"5 bucks? sure kid that sound like a great deal"

8 hours later

"by the way Mister, that wasn't no Porch, that was a Mercedes"  :D

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

I think tape is applied to the rib, but not to the edge.  I think the shape of the edge would make it impossible to get good adhesion of a thin strip of tape to just the edge or a wider strip to the rib and edge

 

The tape that is sometimes used for protecting an edge is 3M 471.  It’s a vinyl tape, and will follow tight curves and bends.  It should be removed and replaced from time to time with regular maintenance.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, chiaroscuro_violins said:

This depends on how expensive your instrument is.  It's pretty low skill and pretty low risk.  And yet... I am not insinuating anything about Philip in particular... you should NEVER underestimate the incompetence of human beings.  

I would never do anything to my cello. I can cut off the tip of my finger while the knife is still in the sheath!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Jerry Lynn said:

The tape that is sometimes used for protecting an edge is 3M 471.  It’s a vinyl tape, and will follow tight curves and bends.  It should be removed and replaced from time to time with regular maintenance.   

Thank you very much I will look it up. I think I would actually Prefer A piece of leather or lizard skin or something like that, but when I mentioned it to my luthier he gave me a “blink – blink wha…?” and politely suggested it would not be very attractive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, PhilipKT said:

Thank you very much I will look it up. I think I would actually Prefer A piece of leather or lizard skin or something like that, but when I mentioned it to my luthier he gave me a “blink – blink wha…?” and politely suggested it would not be very attractive.

I didn’t say I’d recommend it in your case. I don’t think it’s that bad.  Conservative retouching and a healthy coat of retouch varnish on top is my usual first thing to try.  
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Jerry Lynn said:

I didn’t say I’d recommend it in your case. I don’t think it’s that bad.  Conservative retouching and a healthy coat of retouch varnish on top is my usual first thing to try.  
 

 

Well, hopefully I’ll be able to fly to New Mexico and have the maker do the retouch himself, But unfortunately I don’t know when that will be

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to French Polish the area just to seal the end grain.

On edges, it does not require ( as ) much skill. If someone were to show you how to start the process, it will protect the exposed wood. On flat surfaces, like those of a classical guitar, the application requires a great deal of skill. The layers are very very thin, so if one were to work the edges from time to time, the area will build up. Otherwise, the texture will start to look like antique wood signage from Newfoundland. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...